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Free eBook Lion Hunting and Other Mathematical Pursuits: A Collection of Mathematics, Verse, and Stories (Dolciani Mathematical Expositions, Vol 15) download

by Jr Ralph P. Boas,Gerald L. Alexanderson,Dale H. Mugler

Free eBook Lion Hunting and Other Mathematical Pursuits: A Collection of Mathematics, Verse, and Stories (Dolciani Mathematical Expositions, Vol 15) download ISBN: 088385323X
Author: Jr Ralph P. Boas,Gerald L. Alexanderson,Dale H. Mugler
Publisher: The Mathematical Association of America; 1st edition (December 31, 1995)
Language: English
Pages: 316
Category: Other
Subcategory: Science and Mathematics
Size MP3: 1456 mb
Size FLAC: 1424 mb
Rating: 4.1
Format: lrf mobi txt lrf


Ralph P. Boas, Jr. in a recollection from working for the Mathematical . Mathematicians can have a certain sense of humor, and Boas's stories.

From "Lion Hunting": Murray Peshkin listened to an explanation by a student, along the lines of (a long statement), 'so' (another long statement). Murray said, "I understand everything except the 's. " Recollection of Boas on teaching. The subtitle of this book is "A Collection of Mathematics, Verse, and Stories by Ralph P. Boas, J. One doesn't usually think of mathematics and verse together, unless one is a mathematician. Mathematicians can have a certain sense of humor, and Boas's stories about other mathematicians brought back some wonderful memories of graduate school.

Dolciani Mathematical Expositions Volume: 15; 1995; 308 pp; Softcover. I highly recommend Lion Hunting and Other Mathematical Pursuits to high school mathematics clubs, mathematics teachers of all levels, and anyone interested in mathematics. Perhaps the most important feature of this book is how it subtly makes the reader aware of the nature of mathematics. The Mathematics Teacher.

This marvelous collection of Boas memorabilia contains not only the .

This marvelous collection of Boas memorabilia contains not only the original article, but also several additional articles, as late as 1985, giving many further methods. But once you are through with lion hunting, you can hunt through the remainder of the book to find numerous gems by and about this remarkable mathematician. Not only will you find his biography of Bourbaki along with a description of his feud with the French mathematician, but also you will find a lucid discussion of the mean value theorem. You will find mathematical articles like a proof of the fundamental theorem of algebra and pedagogical articles giving Boas' views on making mathematics intelligible. Lion Hunting and Other Mathematical Pursuits: A Collection of Mathematics, Verse, and Stories by the Late Ralph P.

Ralph P. Boas Jr. is a fascinating counterexample to most of these inaccurate assumptions. Filled with humor, verse and mathematics, his optimism and love of life are captured just like the lions so prominently featured in the book. So, how does an unarmed person capture a lion using only the weapons of mathematical thought? There are more ways than you would think. Over thirty different "proven" methods are given.

18. Which Way Did the Bicycle Go?.

16. Linear Algebra Problem Book, Paul R. Halmos. 17. From Erdos to Kiev: Problems of Olympiad Caliber, Ross Honsberger. 18. and Other Intriguing Mathematical Mys¬ teries, Joseph D. E. Konhauser, Dan Velleman, and Stan Wagon. 19. In Polya’s Footsteps: Miscellaneous Problems and Essays, Ross Honsberger

16. From Erdo˝s to Kiev: Problems of Olympiad Caliber, Ross Honsberger. and Other Intriguing Mathematical Myster-ies, Joseph D. In Po´lya’s Footsteps: Miscellaneous Problems and Essays, Ross Honsberger 20. Diophantus and Diophantine Equations, I. G. Bashmakova (Updated by Joseph.

1974, and as president launched the Dolciani Mathematical Expositions series of books

1974, and as president launched the Dolciani Mathematical Expositions series of books. The paper and later work is published in Lion Hunting and Other Mathematical Pursuits : A Collection of Mathematics, Verse, and Stories by the Late Ralph P. Boas J. ISBN 0-88385-323-X. Various online collections of the lion hunting methods exist too. Pondiczery.

In the famous paper of 1938, 'A Contribution to the Mathematical Theory of Big Game Hunting', written by Ralph Boas along with Frank Smithies, using the pseudonym H. W. O. Pétard, Boas describes sixteen methods for hunting a lion. This marvelous collection of Boas memorabilia contains not only the original article, but also several additional articles, as late as 1985, giving many further methods. But once you are through with lion hunting, you can hunt through the remainder of the book to find numerous gems by and about this remarkable mathematician. Not only will you find his biography of Bourbaki along with a description of his feud with the French mathematician, but also you will find a lucid discussion of the mean value theorem. There are anecdotes Boas told about many famous mathematicians, along with a large collection of his mathematical verses. You will find mathematical articles like a proof of the fundamental theorem of algebra and pedagogical articles giving Boas' views on making mathematics intelligible.
User reviews
Thofyn
Absolutely fantastic book. Every math student should have one.
watching to future
From "Lion Hunting": [Mathematical Reviews] sent me a paper by a Japanese author who kept referring to "stricken mass distributions." I couldn't figure out what those were, and finally wrote to the editor of the journal in which the paper had appeared He sent me a copy of the referee's report, which had been sent to the author; this said, in part, "The term 'generalized mass distribution' is no longer used. The word 'generalized' should be stricken."

Ralph P. Boas, Jr. in a recollection from working for the Mathematical Reviews

From "Lion Hunting": Murray Peshkin listened to an explanation by a student, along the lines of (a long statement), 'so' (another long statement). Murray said, "I understand everything except the 'so.'"

Recollection of Boas on teaching

The subtitle of this book is "A Collection of Mathematics, Verse, and Stories by Ralph P. Boas, Jr." One doesn't usually think of mathematics and verse together, unless one is a mathematician.

I have a variety of books on my shelves that are expositions of mathematics or what might be considered popular mathematics. There are times when I bought a book because I thought I would want to read it later only to find my tastes in mathematical topics had changed before I got a chance. In fact, I rarely read any of these books and have given many away.

This one I'm glad I kept. The chapters are relatively short and range from articles from mathematical journals, poetry about mathematics or the profession, short pieces of fiction or mathematical reviews, and reminiscences by Boas and some of his students.

I was delighted by the stories of studying mathematics and being at various universities. Mathematicians can have a certain sense of humor, and Boas's stories about other mathematicians brought back some wonderful memories of graduate school. Many of the stories were familiar, as I'm sure were passed down to me from my professors or just similar to my own experiences. Boas spent some time at Duke and I recognized his descriptions of the Physics Building and the campus, and I think I recognized a name or two.

The title comes from a game Boas and his colleagues played about how to capture a lion using mathematics. The game resulted in many "papers" being published in the American Mathematical Monthly, because the editors of math journals have a sense of humor as well. They also created a pseudonym and published under it. The purported "author" was from a fictitious country, and there was an account of his ward marrying the daughter of Bourbaki, another pseudonym under which mathematics was published.

I didn't read all of the mathematical papers carefully, but I did scan them and found a couple of ideas that I would like to use in class. I enjoyed Boas's recollections, two examples of which I give above. The pieces of fiction, like "The Temptation of Professor McShohat", were fun.

In fact, it was as a writer that Boas excelled. Thus, it makes sense that he was a long time editor of the Mathematical Reviews. I wish that I had used one of his textbooks. I also wish I had known him when he was alive. I would recommend this book to anyone who knows math, knows mathematicians and wants an exemplar of how to write mathematics and how to write about mathematics.