» » Landslide Ecology (Ecology, Biodiversity and Conservation)

Free eBook Landslide Ecology (Ecology, Biodiversity and Conservation) download

by Aaron B. Shiels,Lawrence R. Walker

Free eBook Landslide Ecology (Ecology, Biodiversity and Conservation) download ISBN: 0521190525
Author: Aaron B. Shiels,Lawrence R. Walker
Publisher: Cambridge University Press; 1 edition (July 22, 2013)
Language: English
Pages: 314
Category: Other
Subcategory: Science and Mathematics
Size MP3: 1342 mb
Size FLAC: 1219 mb
Rating: 4.3
Format: mobi mbr docx lrf


Ecology, BIODIVERSITY and conservation. Lawrence R. Walker is a Professor of Plant Ecology at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas.

Lawrence R.

Series: Ecology, Biodiversity and Conservation. Forest biodiversity assessment for reporting conservation performance. Science for Conservation, 216, 1–49. Subjects: Life Sciences, Natural Resource Management, Agriculture, Horticulture and forestry, Ecology and Conservation. Recommend to librarian. It is readable and well-illustrated. The book contains an appropriate mix of knowledge on landslide ecology and its application and provides a solid background for those interested in landscape dynamics.

Ecology, Biodiversity and Conservation: Landslide Ecology. by Lawrence R. Walker and Aaron B. Shiels 6 December 2012. Ecology, Biodiversity and Conservation: Landslide Ecology. Shiels 11 December 2012.

series Ecology, Biodiversity and Conservation. Walker,Aaron B. Shiels. Ecology, Biodiversity and Conservation.

Ecology, Biodiversity and Conservation. Cambridge and New York: Cambridge University Press. xiv + 300 p. + 16 p. il. index. ISBN: 978-0-521-19052-7 (hc); 978-0-521-17840-2 (pb).

Landslide Ecology book. Despite their often dangerous and unpredictable nature, landslides provide fascinating templates for studying how soil organisms, plants and animals respond to such destruction.

What is Ecology? Ecology is a science which studies the interaction of living beings with each other and with the environment. Ecology studies both systems, including changes caused by humans, and systems with natural conditions. Is is closely related to such disciplines as Biology, Chemistry, Mathematics, Geography, Physics, Epidemiology, Biogeochemistry, Sociology. The main aim of Ecology is principles of the rational using of natural resources based on the principles of organization of life. Why study Ecology? First of all, this planet need great specialists in Ecology.

In: Churchill SP, Balslev H, Forero E, Luteyn JL (eds) Biodiversity and conservation of neotropical montane forests.

First Online: 07 January 2009. Lawrence Walker and Eduardo Velázquez were supported by grant DEB-0620910 from the . National Science Foundation as part of the LTER program in Puerto Rico. In: Churchill SP, Balslev H, Forero E, Luteyn JL (eds) Biodiversity and conservation of neotropical montane forests. The New York Botanical Garden, Bronx, pp 207–220Google Scholar.

Ecology is about biodiversity in a given environment

Ecology is about biodiversity in a given environment. It has as much in common with physiology, behavioral sciences and the evolutionary sciences as it has with environmental sciences (2) in concerning time and space. Its main areas include: The processes that make up biological life including adaptation. Distribution, abundance and spatial concentration, and biodiversity.

Despite their often dangerous and unpredictable nature, landslides provide fascinating templates for studying how soil organisms, plants and animals respond to such destruction. The emerging field of landslide ecology helps us understand these responses, aiding slope stabilisation and restoration and contributing to the progress made in geological approaches to landslide prediction and mitigation. Summarising the growing body of literature on the ecological consequences of landslides, this book provides a framework for the promotion of ecological tools in predicting, stabilising, and restoring biodiversity to landslide scars at both local and landscape scales. It explores nutrient cycling; soil development; and how soil organisms disperse, colonise and interact in what is often an inhospitable environment. Recognising the role that these processes play in providing solutions to the problem of unstable slopes, the authors present ecological approaches as useful, economical and resilient supplements to landslide management.