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Free eBook Living With Stroke: A Guide for Families download

by Richard C. Senelick MD

Free eBook Living With Stroke: A Guide for Families download ISBN: 1891525166
Author: Richard C. Senelick MD
Publisher: Healthsouth Press; 4th ed. edition (January 1, 2010)
Language: English
Pages: 289
Category: Other
Subcategory: Medicine and Health Sciences
Size MP3: 1816 mb
Size FLAC: 1228 mb
Rating: 4.6
Format: mbr mobi azw lit


His other books include "Living with Brain Injury: A Guide for Families; The Spinal Cord Injury Handbook; and . Great book for anyone dealing with stroke. My only complaint, some area did not provide the information needed.

His other books include "Living with Brain Injury: A Guide for Families; The Spinal Cord Injury Handbook; and "Beyond Please and Thank you: The Disability Awareness Handbook.

Living With Stroke book. Here, stroke patients and their families, friends, and caregivers can find the newest facts and figures on cutting edge of neural plasticity, constraint therapy, and more.

However, when stroke happens to family members, loved ones, and friends we are suddenly in need of information. Stroke doesn't just affect an individual.

Richard C. Senelick MD.

Two had been recommended to me as being helpful for lay people: (1) "Living With Stroke: A Guide For Families" (Senelick, Rossi & Dougherty, 1999) and (2) "Stoke and the Family: A New Guide" (Stein, 2004).

Dr Richard C SenelickPro Unlimited. Follow Dr Richard C Senelick and others on SoundCloud.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Living with Stroke: A Guide for Families by. .We all know people who have heart disease or cancer, but we think that a stroke happens to other people, not us. Read full description. See details and exclusions.

We all know people who have heart disease or cancer, but we think that a stroke happens to other people, not us.

Here, stroke patients and their families, friends, and caregivers can find the newest facts and figures on the cutting edge theories of neural plasticity and how the brain repairs itself.

Richard C Senelick MD. ISBN-13.

It may be one of the most important decisions you will make and this book gives you the tools to make an informed decision. Richard C Senelick MD.

Living With Stroke: A Guide for Families. Learn More at LibraryThing. by Richard C. ISBN 9781891525162 (978-1-891525-16-2) Softcover, Healthsouth Press, 2010. Find signed collectible books: 'Living With Stroke: A Guide for Families'. Richard C. Senelick MD at LibraryThing.

I bought this book while my husband was still in the hospital after having a stroke. I could not put the book down, as it was so informative. It helped me understand why, how and what next to do for him. 0. Report.

You never think it will happen to you or someone you love. We all know people who have heart disease or cancer, but we think that a stroke happens to other people, not us. Most people are unaware that it is the leading cause of disability in adults and the third leading cause of death. However, when stroke happens to family members, loved ones, and friends we are suddenly in need of information. Stroke doesn't just affect an individual. It impacts everyone who has a relationship with the person who has had the stroke HealthSouth has long known this encompassing impact of stroke -- its pain, its emotional damage, its debilitating after-effects -- not only on its survivors, but the loved ones in its wake. No one knows more that when stroke strikes, you need information, support, and advice fast. In this newest 4th edition of Living with Stroke: A Guide for Families, you will find the latest up to date information on stroke. Here, stroke patients and their families, friends, and caregivers can find the newest facts and figures on the cutting edge theories of neural plasticity and how the brain repairs itself. Here, too, in clear, easy-to-understand language is the entire process of rehabilitation - as well as the mechanisms that can create a stroke. You will learn why the correct type of rehabilitation is essential and most importantly, how to pick a rehabilitation facility for yourself or your loved one. It may be one of the most important decisions you will make and this book gives you the tools to make an informed decision.
User reviews
Mikale
If you haven't had a stroke, you don't know what it is to live with one. If you have had one - and especially if you've worked hard and made a pretty fair recovery - you might have family members accusing you of laziness, of malingering, of begging sympathy. It's a so-called 'invisible illness'; they can't see it, so it isn't real to them, and they don't realize how you struggle with day to day tasks they find easy and take for granted, This book is for them, so that some authority can inform them that your brain doesn't work like it used to - that life is more of a struggle for you than it used to be, and perhaps your loved ones will stop saying ignorant and cruel things to you. Of course you can't force them to read it, but if they do, your family might be a tad more sympathetic and understanding toward you. You may seem fine to them, but this explains things to them you may have had trouble getting across.Also has a lot of pertinent information for the stroke victim for how to reclaim as much of his former quality of life as possible.
sunrise bird
Make sure to get the newer (2001) version of this text. Amazon will be more than happy to send you a "new" earlier edition (1999) if you aren't careful. Unfortunately, the 1999 cover of "Living with Stroke" is of very low contrast, and thus difficult to read. So, older folks or people with low vision may be a bit put off by the cover. (But don't let this scare you away. The text within is large and readable.) The newer version may very well contain more up-to-date info.

In response to a family emergency, I ordered four books on stoke recovery. Two had been recommended to me as being helpful for lay people: (1) "Living With Stroke: A Guide For Families" (Senelick, Rossi & Dougherty, 1999) and (2) "Stoke and the Family: A New Guide" (Stein, 2004). I ordered these for my family members (and myself). Two more were written at a much more scholarly, technical level for clinicans: (3) "Recovery after Stroke" (Barnes, Dobkin, & Bogousslavsky, Eds, 2005), and (4) "Stroke Rehabilitation: A Function-Based Approach" (Gillen & Burkhardt, Eds, 2004).

Each of these books has much to recommend it. I hope to write reviews of all four later. I can see why the first two are standouts, and have been helpful to so many people. They are well-written, concise books with plenty of important information. They will help you quickly become an educated consumer of medical care. (They won't always familiarize you with medical controversies and choices, but they do a remarkable job of capturing the key issues. Controversies include the use of anti-seizure meds, and the use of statins for cholesterol reduction, especially in women.).

This book describes the various physical manifestation of stroke (e.g., left vs right hemisphere), types of stroke (e.g., thrombotic, embolic, hemorrhagic, lacunar), diagnosis, pharmacological treatments, risk factors, and the basic rehabilitation spectrum--from physical therapy and activities of daily living to impact of stroke on daily life. The book offers creative ideas for navigating each of the key components. I especially liked the fact that the book does a nice job of covering psychological issues. I'm not talking about old-school psychoanalysis here. I'm talking about things like behavioral, cognitive, and family systems approaches to psychological health. There are plenty of tools provided for dealing with cognitive distortion, pessimism, etc. The book is concerned with the health of the patient AND the health of family and friends.

I believe that many people will be able to complete the book in a night or two. That's important when time is of the essence and you are trying to educate yourself quickly.

If you are a family member and or a caretaker: This is the book to bring with you to the hospital waiting room. You are likely to be waiting for long periods between visits with doctors and nurses, and you'll have many questions. You'll learn much more detailed general information from this book than the 10 minutes you spend consulting with the doc. What this book doesn't explain is how to deal with hospital staff who are busy and not always concerned with communicating with family members. But it provides plenty more. You can use this book to educate other family members and friends who might not be as thorough and bookish as you, and win them over to a sensible and realistic agenda.

If you are a professional, you may find this book helpful, for a variety of reasons. First off, you might consider recommending this book, or the book by Stein, to your patients. Moreover, you might use the language in these books to explain situations and decisions to patients and their families. The authors have taken care to discuss emotionally and cognitively complex material in a sensible and clear manner.
Nafyn
A few years ago, my father had a stroke that left him (at the time) unable to speak or to move the right side of his body. Thankfully, he is much better now. The rehabilitation hospital he was at (HealthSouth) gave this book to our family to help us understand what he was going through. This book has been read cover to cover by many of my family members. It helps you understand so much that you just would not have known without this guide. I purchased this book for a friend whose close relative had a massive stroke. She said the book also helped her to understand what he was going through. This book is a major help to you at a time when you feel like your world is upside down. I would definitely recommend this book!!!
Painshade
this book has been fantastic for helping families and other caregivers of individuals who have suffered a stroke! this book hadn't been written back when my own father suffered his strokes. i really wish that it had been - it would have been of immense help to my own family. now, i am fortunate to be able to recommend it and lend it to families, who all find it to be well written, easy to read and understand, and full of helpful and practical advice in dealing with our loved one, protecting them, and helping us to communicate more clearly and cope more effectively. an excellent contribution to the field!
Humin
The rehab facility gave us this book when my mother had her stroke 6 years ago. It is a very helpful and thorough book for both the stroke victim and their family. It explains in detail left and right brain strokes and what to expect when dealing with it afterwards. It includes rehab and emotions that are experienced. In our family we call it "the stroke book". It has been so helpful to all of us that I have bought it for others who are going through the recovery process for a stroke. I can't recommend it highly enough.
LONUDOG
This book has been wonderful while dealing with my husbands stroke.
Winail
I found this book while recovering from a stroke. There were so many questions I had that no one could help me with, but I found many of the answers in this book. Everything is explained on a patient level instead of a medical professional level, so it was very easy to understand and incorporate what I needed. I highly recommend this for all patients and their families.
This is one of the best books on strokes . What happens to the victims of different types of strokes, the aftermath & what the person is going through both physical & emotionally . Also gives insight on helping the stroke patients .