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Free eBook The Black Hole of Auschwitz download

by Marco Belpoliti,Sharon Wood,Primo Levi

Free eBook The Black Hole of Auschwitz download ISBN: 0745632416
Author: Marco Belpoliti,Sharon Wood,Primo Levi
Publisher: Polity (January 4, 2006)
Language: English
Pages: 240
Category: Other
Subcategory: Humanities
Size MP3: 1930 mb
Size FLAC: 1698 mb
Rating: 4.2
Format: lrf rtf azw lit


Primo Levi gives us his insight on other authors' works as well as further details of nis ow. I assume that this book is a translation of Levi's "L'asimmetria e la vita: Articoli e saggi 1955-1987," published in Italian in 2002

Primo Levi gives us his insight on other authors' works as well as further details of nis own. A book for those who have already read some of his work, especially The Periodic Table and If This Is a Man and The Truce. Levi (and his translators, who are excellent)holds the mirror to humankind's deeds - and still wonders WHY such things came to pass. I assume that this book is a translation of Levi's "L'asimmetria e la vita: Articoli e saggi 1955-1987," published in Italian in 2002. I have not checked out the English translation, but the Italian original is a wonderful book and a great introductio to Levi.

The Black Hole of Auschwitz is a collection of essays by the Italian author Primo Levi. Originally published under the Italian title Asymmetry and Life it has two distinct halves. The first half, The Black Hole of Auschwitz is a collection of essays, often prefaces to other books, which make a plea against Holocaust denial. The second half, Other People's Trades, is a mixture of essays on a wide variety of subjects.

This book is a collection of Levi's previously published writings (essays, newspaper articles, prefaces to books, et.

Sharon Wood (Translator). Lists with This Book. This book is not yet featured on Listopia. This book is a collection of Levi's previously published writings (essays, newspaper articles, prefaces to books, et. There is no narrative arc to help readers through and the writing is dense, as short pieces tend to be, but the effort is worth it.

The Monument at Auschwitz. 5. Arbeit Macht Frei. 8. The Time of Swastikas. Preface to R Hösss Commandant of Auschwitz. 83. The Black Hole of Auschwitz. 90. Preface to La vita offesa. 12. Resistance in the Camps.

Part I: the black hole of auschwitz. 2. The Monument at Auschwitz.

Primo Levi (1919-87) was born and lived his entire life in or near Turin, with the exception of the years 1944-45, when he was captured as an anti-Fascist partisan, deported to Auschwitz, and then released into war-torn Europe. He was the author of such acclaimed works as If This a Man, The Periodic Table and The Drowned and the Saved. Part I: the black hole of auschwitz. 3. ‘Arbeit Macht Frei’.

The Black Hole of Auschwitz - Infobox Book name The Black Hole of Auschwitz title orig L asimmetria e la vita translator Sharon Wood image caption Paperback cover published by Polity. Collected Poems (Primo Levi) - Collected Poems.

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The Black Hole of Auschwitz

The Black Hole of Auschwitz. From the publisher: The Black Hole of Auschwitz brings together Levi’s writings on the Holocaust and his experiences of the concentration camp, as well as those on his own accidental status as a writer and his chosen profession of chemist. In this book Levi rails intelligently and eloquently against what he saw as the ebb of compassion and interest in the Holocaust, and the yearly assault on the veracity and moral weight of the testimonies of its survivors.

Primo Levi in Il Corriere della Sera, May 8, 1974; reprinted in L’assimetria e la vita, ed. Marco Belpoliti (Turin: Einaudi, 2002); translated as The Past We Thought Would Never Return,, The Black Hole of Auschwitz, trans. Sharon Wood (New York: Polity Press, 2005), 3. oogle Scholar. Elie Wiesel, Legends of Our Time, trans. Stephen Donadio (New York: Avon, 1970), 23. 13. Eva Hoffman, After Such Knowledge: Memory, History, and the Legacy of the Holocaust (New York: Public Affairs, 2004).

Book Overviews: Top Book, Top Author, Top Genre

Book Overviews: Top Book, Top Author, Top Genre. The Black Hole of Auschwitz brings together Levi's writings on the Holocaust and his experiences of the concentration camp, as well as those on his own accidental status as a writer and his chosen profession of chemist.

The Black Hole of Auschwitz brings together Levi’s writings on the Holocaust and his experiences of the concentration camp, as well as those on his own accidental status as a writer and his chosen profession of chemist. In this book Levi rails intelligently and eloquently against what he saw as the ebb of compassion and interest in the Holocaust, and the yearly assault on the veracity and moral weight of the testimonies of its survivors. For Levi, to keep writing and, through writing, to understand why the Holocaust could happen, was nothing less than a safeguard against the loss of a collective memory of the atrocities perpetrated against the Jewish people.

This moving book not only reveals the care and conviction with which he wrote about the Holocaust, but also shows the range of Levi’s interests and the skill, thoughtfulness and sensitivity he brought to all his subjects. The consistency and moral force of Levi’s reflections and the clarity and intimacy of his style will make this book appeal to a wide readership, including those who have read and been moved by his masterpiece If This is a Man.

User reviews
ZEr0
Primo Levi gives us his insight on other authors' works as well as further details of nis own. A book for those who have already read some of his work, especially The Periodic Table and If This Is a Man and The Truce. Levi (and his translators, who are excellent)holds the mirror to humankind's deeds - and still wonders WHY such things came to pass. Not always able to fully explain certain actions (but for pure evil), Levi makes us look inside our own souls, our sence of dignity, our favor for respect of others - or the lack of it. Articles and lectures current to the time of his death - a wonderful book.
grand star
A slightly uneven and mildly repetitive collection of essays, lectures and articles form various newspapers and journals, nevertheless Primo Levi is always worth the read if for no other reason than his rather stunning ability to articulate his thoughts about his experiences in Auschwitz and after his liberation and homecoming as well as Fascism and Nazism in general. His writing has an Emperors New Clothes feel about it in his tempered outrage, and much of it is commentary about his won work and the responses he got to his previous writings.
Lanionge
I assume that this book is a translation of Levi's "L'asimmetria e la vita: Articoli e saggi 1955-1987," published in Italian in 2002. I have not checked out the English translation, but the Italian original is a wonderful book and a great introductio to Levi.

I do want to respond to "Old School" who wrote the first review to "The Black Hole." I urge him or her to read Ian Thomson's magnificent biography "Primo Levi: A Life." That Levi committed suicide--and Thomson has no doubt that he did--had its roots in a lifelong battle with depression. Auschwitz may have have compounded his depressive tendencies, but it did not cause them. And there is no evidence to suggest that he committed suicide because his laments about the Holocaust were not being heard. None. Nor will the book under review here supply such evidence. See Thomson, pp, 493ff.
Jorad
The Amazon blurb about the author shows how little he or she understands about what drove Mr. Levi to commit suicide. He had spent so much energy and effort trying to explain if that's even the word, what had happened during the Holocaust. He felt toward the end of his life that no one was listening and as he and others knew so well, we were bypassing knowledge that would hopefully have led to the end of the madness of war and genocide. It was total despair that caused him to throw himself over the balcony in his apartment building and to me there isn't a touch of irony in what he felt he had to do. The worst sin of all as Eli Weisel has so often pointed out is that of indifference. We the reading public were not heeding the warnings coming from gentlemen such as these two and it is easy to see how Primo Levi was simply driven back into madness because of it.