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by Frank G. Kirkpatrick

Free eBook Together Bound: God, History, and the Religious Community download ISBN: 0195083423
Author: Frank G. Kirkpatrick
Publisher: Oxford University Press; 1 edition (January 6, 1994)
Language: English
Pages: 216
Category: Other
Subcategory: Humanities
Size MP3: 1182 mb
Size FLAC: 1828 mb
Rating: 4.5
Format: azw lit txt lrf


fostering universal community. Kirkpatrick claims that God and the world are distinct realities ''together bound'' in a mutual relationship of reciprocal historical action. In this relationship, God both acts upon and responds to human beings in specific moments in their history.

fostering universal community. The implications of this claim for understanding the biblical narrative, the problem of evil, cosmological theories, and the realism of Christian community are pursued.

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Together Bound: God, History, and the Religious Community. New York: Oxford University Press, 1994. Recommend this journal.

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Title: Community By: Frank G. Kirkpatrick Format: Paperback . Kirkpatrick Format: Paperback Number of Pages: 248 Vendor: Wipf & Stock Publication Date: 2008. Dimensions: . 0 X . 0 (inches) Weight: 12 ounces ISBN: 1606081942 ISBN-13: 9781606081945 Stock No: WW081945. Publisher's Description. He has published five other books including books The Episcopal Church in Crisis; Together Bound: God, History, and the Religious Community; The Ethics of Community; A Moral Ontology for a Theistic Ethic: Gathering the Nations in Love and Justice; and John Macmurray: Community Beyond Political Philosophy.

God, history, and the religious community. Published 1994 by Oxford University Press in New York. Christianity, Faith, God, History, Knowableness, Religious aspects of History. Includes bibliographical references (p. 187-191) and index. Kirkpatrick is Professor of Religion at Trinity College in Hartford . 7. Turning Inward to Community: The Family and The Danger of To. . Kirkpatrick is Professor of Religion at Trinity College in Hartford, Connecticut. Turning Inward to Community: The Family and The Danger of Too Much Community. The Family as Community. Dangers of Too Much Community. This is the position taken by such philosophers as Richard Rorty,Philosophy and the Mirror of Nature (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1979) and by deconstructionists generally. See especially Mark C. Taylor,Erring (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1984) and Thomas . Altizer et a. Deconstruction and Theology (New York: Crossroad, 1982). 5. This is the position by some representatives of transcendental Thomism. Richard Viladesau,Answering for Faith (New York: Paulist Press, c. 1987), pp. 39–42.

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Challenging the assumption that the concept of divine action is necessarily paradoxical, on the grounds that God is radically transcendent of finitude, or can perform only a master act of creating and sustaining the universe, Frank Kirkpatrick defends as philosophically credible the Christian conviction that God is a personal Agent who also acts in particular historical moments to further the divine intention of fostering universal community. Kirkpatrick claims that God and the world are distinct realities "together bound" in a mutual relationship of reciprocal historical action. In this relationship, God both acts upon and responds to human beings in specific moments in their history. The implications of this claim for understanding the biblical narrative, the problem of evil, cosmological theories, and the realism of Christian community are pursued.