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Free eBook Grey Eminence (Flamingo Modern Classics) download

by Aldous Huxley

Free eBook Grey Eminence (Flamingo Modern Classics) download ISBN: 0006547435
Author: Aldous Huxley
Publisher: Harpercollins (March 1, 1994)
Language: English
Pages: 304
Category: Other
Subcategory: Humanities
Size MP3: 1826 mb
Size FLAC: 1167 mb
Rating: 4.9
Format: mobi azw lrf rtf


Grey Eminence is a non-fiction book by Aldous Huxley, first published in 1941. Huxley was intensely interested in mysticism, and seems to have been a self-proclaimed expert on the subject.

Grey Eminence is a non-fiction book by Aldous Huxley, first published in 1941. Huxley is mostly known for his dystopian novel Brave New World. Spiritual seekers may also be familiar with his non-fiction works The Perennial Philosophy and The Doors of Perception. Religion and mysticism also play a central role in Grey Eminence, a biography of Père Joseph or Father Joseph, a 17th century French Capuchin friar.

Publisher: Flamingo ISBN 13: 9780006547433. See all. About this item.

Aldous Huxley was right to be fascinated with Father Joseph

Reading Aldous Huxley reminds one of how beautiful modern English prose can be. His biography of Father Joseph, effective French foreign minister during the Thirty Years War, is a perfect mix of novelistic description, history, biography and philosophical essay. Aldous Huxley was right to be fascinated with Father Joseph. His life is a reminder that those with radiant places in history were not the only ones, or even the most important ones, who made it. It also reminds us that the devil has no prophesied form.

Prices (including delivery) for Island (Flamingo modern classics) by Aldous Huxley. In Island, his last novel, Huxley transports us to a Pacific island where, for 120 years, an ideal society has flourished

Prices (including delivery) for Island (Flamingo modern classics) by Aldous Huxley. In Island, his last novel, Huxley transports us to a Pacific island where, for 120 years, an ideal society has flourished. Inevitably, this island of bliss attracts the envy and enmity of the surrounding world. A conspiracy is underway to take over Pala and events begin to move when an agent of the conspirators, a newspaperman named Faranby, is shipwrecked there.

In his final novel, which he considered his most important, Aldous Huxley transports us to the remote Pacific island of Pala, where an ideal society has flourished for 120 years. A conspiracy is underway to take over Pala, and events are set in motion when an agent of the conspirators, a newspaperman named Faranby, is shipwrecked there.

author: Huxley Aldous d. ate. te: 2006-02-03 d. citation: 1941 d. dentifier. origpath: ad/0132/802 d. copyno: 1 d.

2. Brave New World (Flamingo modern classics).

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1994: by Aldous HuxleyHuxley has put so much of his personality and style into this book that it should interest everybody, what ever the At the failure and included a significant commissions. This may seem unintelligible without the gritty subject matter though goal. According to be already established in france?

Find nearly any book by Aldous Huxley (page 13). Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 booksellers.

Find nearly any book by Aldous Huxley (page 13). ISBN 9780006547341 (978-0-00-654734-1) Softcover, Flamingo, 1994. Find signed collectible books: 'Island'.

Flamingo Modern Classics. Рэй Дуглас Брэдбери 2005

Flamingo Modern Classics. Рэй Дуглас Брэдбери 2005. A classic collection of stories - all told on the skin of a man - from the author of Fahrenheit 451. If El Greco had painted miniatures in his prime, no bigger than your hand, infinitely detailed, with his sulphurous colour and exquisite human anatomy, perhaps he might have used this man's body for his art!

The life of Father Joseph, Cardinal Richelieu's aide, was a monstrous paradox. After a day spent in directing operations on the battlefield Father Joseph would pass the night in prayer, or in composing spiritual guidance for the nuns in his care. He was an aspirant to sainthood, a practising mystic, yet his ruthless exercise of power succeeded in prolonging the Thirty Years War, with all its unspeakable horrors. How a religious man could lead such a life, how an individual could reconcile the seemingly opposing moral systems of religion and politics, was a theme to which Huxley would continuously return.
User reviews
IWAS
The beginning of Huxley's search into mystical relationships with an unknown God. A very good read for those interested in the Thirty Years War and its impact on Europe.
Felhann
Fast shipping, it is as described
Bev
It's a book
Lailace
Who is actually interested in the obscure Christian mystical practices and depressing court intrigues of 17th century France? I certainly wasn't, until I picked up this book. I've read quite a few of Huxley's books but I really thought this was the best, rather surprisingly, as "Brave New World" and others I found to be incredibly good.

'Grey Eminence' follows the life of the French Father Joseph, a Capuchin monk and mystic until circumstance (and perhaps his own vicarious lust for power) drew him into the power politics of the 30 Years' War in Europe. Working essentially as the lackey for the powerful and heartless Cardinal Richelieu (or perhaps as his puppetmaster, as this book shows), Father Joseph remained a monk to the last, eating one meal a day and basically walking all over Europe (and barefoot!) to accomplish his intrigues and lay seige to various strongholds of heathenism (as Pere Joseph perceived it, at least). If only all history could be written so well, I'd be reading a lot more of it.

However, above and beyond the history (very well done) and biography (also excellent), the themes Huxley brings up throughout the book fascinating and tie in very well with much of his life's work. A central idea is the Christian mystic practice of "active annihilation," that is, destroying one's own will utterly so that one acts merely as an instrument or conduit for God's (or ultimate reality's, as Huxley prefers to look at it) will or intention. This idea is examined magnificently - its ultimate benefits if successful (Huxley considers such an attainment the highest form of spiritual realization, and makes a good case for this assertion) and its horrible, horrible consequences if unsuccessful (with the life of Father Joseph as a case study in this kind of failure). Pere Joseph's mistake was to assume that France, too, was but an instrument of God's will - and therefore anything he could do to increase and maintain French hegemony, and by implication to ruin and destroy its competitors, was God's will. Big mistake, as Huxley so sympathetically points out. Father Joseph's and Richelieu's policies greatly exacerbated the 30 Years' War and led directly (and indirectly) to untold suffering not only of France's enemies, but its own people. Rape, pillage, destruction, cannabalism, and so on...

If I'm not mistaken this book was written during WWII (published, it says, in 1944) and it can also be seen not only as a parallel of that contemporary madness, but as Huxley's Apology for his own reluctance to engage in politics and the war. Huxley, we can assume, is Father Joseph the younger, a well-intentioned mystic seeking to align himself with the true will or purpose of this universe. Humbly admitting that he has not nearly arrived at that point, Huxley defends the idea, in this long parable, that one who believes unflinchingly that right is on their side and acts with this resolve (not to mention deafness to criticism) will only sow hatred and misery in the world --- unless (a big if), they truly have achieved active annihilation.

The prose shines here, the people come alive, and the insights and arguments (as above) are intriguing reading. It's great to see this appears to be still in print. Highly recommended. In fact this book is so good I wanted to steal it from the library of the monastery I borrowed it from and just let them keep my 'lost book deposit' - as I feel though that I haven't quite completely 'actively annihilated' my own will, it's probably best to stick to conventional morality for now and just return it!
Nilador
Who is actually interested in the obscure Christian mystical practices and depressing court intrigues of 17th century France? I certainly wasn't, until I picked up this book. I've read quite a few of Huxley's books but I really thought this was the best, rather surprisingly, as "Brave New World" and others I found to be incredibly good.

'Grey Eminence' follows the life of the French Father Joseph, a Capuchin monk and mystic until circumstance (and perhaps his own vicarious lust for power) drew him into the power politics of the 30 Years' War in Europe. Working essentially as the lackey for the powerful and heartless Cardinal Richelieu (or perhaps as his puppetmaster, as this book shows), Father Joseph remained a monk to the last, eating one meal a day and basically walking all over Europe (and barefoot!) to accomplish his intrigues and lay seige to various strongholds of heathenism (as Pere Joseph perceived it, at least). If only all history could be written so well, I'd be reading a lot more of it.

However, above and beyond the history (very well done) and biography (also excellent), the themes Huxley brings up throughout the book fascinating and tie in very well with much of his life's work. A central idea is the Christian mystic practice of "active annihilation," that is, destroying one's own will utterly so that one acts merely as an instrument or conduit for God's (or ultimate reality's, as Huxley prefers to look at it) will or intention. This idea is examined magnificently - its ultimate benefits if successful (Huxley considers such an attainment the highest form of spiritual realization, and makes a good case for this assertion) and its horrible, horrible consequences if unsuccessful (with the life of Father Joseph as a case study in this kind of failure). Pere Joseph's mistake was to assume that France, too, was but an instrument of God's will - and therefore anything he could do to increase and maintain French hegemony, and by implication to ruin and destroy its competitors, was God's will. Big mistake, as Huxley so sympathetically points out. Father Joseph's and Richelieu's policies greatly exacerbated the 30 Years' War and led directly (and indirectly) to untold suffering not only of France's enemies, but its own people. Rape, pillage, destruction, cannabalism, and so on...

If I'm not mistaken this book was written during WWII (published, it says, in 1944) and it can also be seen not only as a parallel of that contemporary madness, but as Huxley's Apology for his own reluctance to engage in politics and the war. Huxley, we can assume, is Father Joseph the younger, a well-intentioned mystic seeking to align himself with the true will or purpose of this universe. Humbly admitting that he has not nearly arrived at that point, Huxley defends the idea, in this long parable, that one who believes unflinchingly that right is on their side and acts with this resolve (not to mention deafness to criticism) will only sow hatred and misery in the world --- unless (a big if), they truly have achieved active annihilation.

The prose shines here, the people come alive, and the insights and arguments (as above) are intriguing reading. It's great to see this appears to be still in print. Highly recommended. In fact this book is so good I wanted to steal it from the library of the monastery I borrowed it from and just let them keep my 'lost book deposit' - as I feel though that I haven't quite completely 'actively annihilated' my own will, it's probably best to stick to conventional morality for now and just return it!