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Free eBook Satellite Down download

by Rob Thomas

Free eBook Satellite Down download ISBN: 0613223349
Author: Rob Thomas
Publisher: Rebound by Sagebrush (September 1999)
Language: English
Category: Other
Subcategory: Humanities
Size MP3: 1279 mb
Size FLAC: 1656 mb
Rating: 4.2
Format: lrf lit doc mobi


Thomas is the author of numerous young adult books for Simon & Schuster including Rats Saw God, Slave Day, Satellite Down, and Doing Time: Notes from the Undergrad. Библиографические данные.

Thomas is the author of numerous young adult books for Simon & Schuster including Rats Saw God, Slave Day, Satellite Down, and Doing Time: Notes from the Undergrad.

Robert James "Rob" Thomas is an American author, producer, and screenwriter, best known as the author of the 1996 novel Rats Saw God, creator of the critically acclaimed television series Veronica Mars and co-creator of 90210 and Party Down. Mor. rivia About Satellite Down.

Patrick's thrilled to become a student reporter on a teen news show. Selected to be an anchor on Classroom Direct, seventeen-year-old Patrick Sheridan finds his journalistic idealism and his own self- image challenged when he leaves high school in Doggett, Texas, for the glamorous life in Los Angeles.

Satellite Down - Rob Thomas. The goofy way Mr. Linder is stuttering-I have to look down at the floor to keep from just busting out laughing. Zeb’s probably gotten it the worst. You see, he’s a specimen. He’s six four, two hundred pounds, muscles popping out everywhere.

Satellite Down by Rob Thomas - Rob Thomas, creator of Veronica Mars and author of Rats Saw God, delivers a. .

Satellite Down by Rob Thomas - Rob Thomas, creator of Veronica Mars and author of Rats Saw God, delivers a poignant tale of a young man caught in the crossroads. In addition to his television work, Thomas is the author of several young adult books including Rats Saw God, Slave Day, Satellite Down, and Doing Time: Notes From the Undergrad. He lives in Austin, Texas, with his wife Katie, daughter Greta, and son Hank. Visit him at SlaveRats. Publisher: Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers (September 4, 2018). ISBN13: 9781534430105. Grades: 7 and up. Ages: 12 - 99. Browse Related Books.

Robert James Thomas (born August 15, 1965) is an American author, producer, director and screenwriter. He is best known for creating the acclaimed television series Veronica Mars (2004–2007, 2019), and co-creating 90210 (2008–2013), Party Down (2009–2010), and iZombie (2015–2019). Thomas was born in Sunnyside, Washington. He graduated from San Marcos High School in 1983 and went to Texas Christian University (TCU) on a football scholarship.

Title: Satellite Down - eBook By: Rob Thomas Format: DRM Protected ePub Vendor: Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers . Rob Thomas is the creator and executive producer of the television series Veronica Mars.

Title: Satellite Down - eBook By: Rob Thomas Format: DRM Protected ePub Vendor: Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers Publication Date: 2012. ISBN: 9781442468085 ISBN-13: 9781442468085 Ages: 12-16 Stock No: WW27631EB. Publisher's Description. He is also a cocreator and executive producer of the cable television series Party Down. In addition to his television work, Thomas is the author of five young adult books for Simon & Schuster including Rats Saw God, Slave Day, Satellite Down, and Doing Time: Notes From the Undergrad.

by. Thomas, Rob. Publication date. Television broadcasting of news, Self-perception. New York : Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; americana. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by Christine Wagner on March 16, 2010.

Patrick Sheridan is experiencing technical difficulties...

Patrick's thrilled to become a student reporter on a teen news show. But when he leaves his small Texas town for the bright lights of Los Angeles, everything changes. It doesn't take long before Patrick is mingling with the rich and famous and doing all kinds of things he never thought he would -- like cheating on his girlfriend, lying to his parents, and losing his best friend. And by the time he learns that it was his handsome face and not his writing that landed him his new job, he's left to pick up the pieces alone. Hollywood is already full of beautiful people with no talent; how can he prove that he's more? He'll have to start by convincing himself.

User reviews
Usanner
I was just listening to Rob Thomas being interviewed along with Steven Levitan and John Enbom on the Nerdist Writers Panel podcast, wherein he recounts basically living a version of this very story (except he would have been one of the adults in it, and not the protagonist, Patrick...). Pretty interesting subject matter, here, and although this book really leaps around to a lot of new places without ever really backtracking, we get a lot of interesting characters, as well. As a protagonist, I find Patrick in a downward spiral, starting at the peak of his idealism and plummeting from there. If this book had a sequel set 10 years later, I think we'd find Mr. Sheridan a bitter, burned out guy just kind of going through the motions of work and sex and booze...

While I'm definitely a fan of Rob Thomas' books and shows, this title (like his other previous books, specifically) suffers from a few things that, as an adult reader, are a bit difficult to slog through. For one, Thomas seems to always fill his books with a character that's just too naive to be taken seriously. In this case, it's the main character. Patrick is always asking people what fairly common slang terms mean because he's just such a down-home country boy... It's just not believable, as though no Texan teenager has ever used slang or heard rap music before. Also, some of the pop culture references have become dated, ten years past the book's first publication date. Not a huge deal, but a little bit like, "Oh yeah, Shaquille O'Neil had just become hot back then..."

What most of the reviews and synopses that I've seen fail to mention about this book is the really great bits set in Ireland towards the end of the novel. As I said, it leaps around a lot, but those passages had me wishing that the entire book was just about a teen running away in a foreign country. Patrick really only ever seems happy when tending bar in a tiny Irish village, and the characters there really shine in their short page time. Then some sort of unrealistic stuff goes down VERY quickly and it's back to Texas, with a pretty interesting and dark finish.

So all in all, this might be my least favorite Rob Thomas book, but only because his other efforts are SO good. This book falls short of being GREAT simply because I feel like it needed a little more grounding and a lot more closure. You'll definitely be left wondering what happened with a lot of the characters, but maybe when television stops being a thing, Mr. Thomas will grace us with another tale set in Mr. Sheridan's universe...
TheMoonix
Dont let the cheesey cover fool you... This is a funny, intelligent and engaging novel with fully fleshed out characters who talk like real people. rob thomas (of veronica mars fame) is a great writer. He never fails to surprise the reader with a plot that feels earned and honest. Great writer. Great book
Akirg
Its a good book, it held my attention and the descriptions are so vivid. But it seemed like 2 different stories that weren't completely cohesive.
Meri
Satellite Down is, quite simply, the best Young Adult novel of the year. Patrick Sheridan, the main character, is brilliantly captured at the exact moment in time when he comes to understand once and for all that life is not a free ride. His adventures in the tainted, corrupt, and vapid world of television news, both in front of and behind the camera, are right on the money. The knockout punch of Satellite Down, however, is Patrick's soul searching journey for his roots through the rugged Irish countryside during the latter part of the novel. It is, in a word, flawless. The final sixty pages do more than represent the best writing in Thomas' canon. The closing stands as one of the finest examples of writing in the Young Adult genre, period. While an entire cottage industry has evolved around catering to melodrama and tidy sitcom closure in teenage "literature", Satellite Down dares to wander down a different path. The path of truth. The truth of how awfully life can treat us sometimes. About how it can be difficult, and messy, and without concrete answers at certain points in our complicated, ever changing tenure on this planet. Few authors choose to wander down this path, and with good reason. The possibility of rejection is enormous when you write about the emotional trials of life, especially when you fail leave a pot of gold at journey's end. In past novels, Thomas has masterfully portrayed the language and the urban rituals of the age group he has adopted as his own. With Satellite Down, the author broadens his trajectory by unflinchingly portraying the ambiguities of growing up in an age of constant media bombardment and rootless family angst. Rob Thomas would have done a disservice to the reading public, and the adolescent reading public in particular, had he made the choice most authors would've - pulled a rabbit out of the hat to make everything all right on the last page. Thankfully for us all, Thomas did not. And even more thankfully, he is good company. Would Rumble Fish remain the same powerful allegory to the devistating nature of fate had S.E. Hinton herself ignored the Wheel of Fortune and saved the Motorcycle Boy? Would The Chocolate War be revered as a landmark testament to teenage cruelty if Jerry's resistance to the Vigils had ended with anything other than those shattering blows in the ring? Rob Thomas is one of the few individuals writing for adolescents today who could legitimately follow in the footsteps of those YA authors we have seen fit to canonize. Satellite Down is the next big step toward securing his place in that pantheon.
David Scoma
Iaran
Satellite Down is a well-written story touching on themes of commercialism and its impact on both teen-agers and the world in general. The main character, good-looking high school senior Patrick Sheridan, is swept into a world where the superficial rule over the intelligent. We get to see the once well-mannered, religious, naive texas native who believes in hard work and real journalism be morphed and changed by ideas of beauty and success as a television news reporter. He learns more about himself and what he really believes in through his mistakes. By the end, he begins to think he had it all right in the first place. Rob Thomas, creator/staff writer of "Veronica Mars" and author of three other books, demonstrates his best work through this interesting and inticing novel that any person living in todays modern world can relate to. In a book with a plot centering on hollywood and the "evils" of commercialism, one would expect something generic and unimaginative. But this is a wonderful story that is not sugar coated but at the same time, is not too angry or too accusative. It does not set the blame on consumerism but on the inability of humans to resist. It is a relatively fast read that will leave you thinking.