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Free eBook Neither Wolf Nor Dog: American Indians, Environment, and Agrarian Change download

by David Rich Lewis

Free eBook Neither Wolf Nor Dog: American Indians, Environment, and Agrarian Change download ISBN: 0195117948
Author: David Rich Lewis
Publisher: Oxford University Press; Revised edition (October 23, 1997)
Language: English
Pages: 256
Category: Other
Subcategory: Humanities
Size MP3: 1915 mb
Size FLAC: 1102 mb
Rating: 4.1
Format: rtf doc docx mobi


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Home Browse Books Book details, Neither Wolf nor Dog: American Indians . During the nineteenth century, Americans looked to the eventual civilization and assimilation of Native Americans through a process of removal, reservation, and directed culture change.

Home Browse Books Book details, Neither Wolf nor Dog: American Indians,. Neither Wolf nor Dog: American Indians, Environment, and Agrarian Change. Policies for directed subsistence change and incorporation had far-reaching social and environmental consequences for native peoples and native lands.

During the nineteenth century, Americans looked to the eventual civilization and assimilation of Native Americans through a process of removal, reservation, and directed culture change. This study explores the experiences of three groups-Northern Utes, Hupas, and Tohono O'odhams-with settled reservation and allotted agriculture in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

Neither Wolf Nor Dog explores the experiences of three groups-Northern Utes, Hupas, and TohonoO'odhams-with settled reservation and allotted agriculture in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

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Underlying American Indian policy was a belief in a developmental stage theory of human societies in which agriculture marked the passage between barbarism and civilization. Solving the Indian Problem appeared as simple as teaching Indians to settle down and farm and then disappear into mainstream American society.

Judith Antell is the director of the American Indian Studies Program at the University of Wyoming. Shepard Krech III is a professor of anthropology and environmental studies and the director of the Haffenreffer Museum of Anthropology at Brown University.

Lewis, David Rich (1994). History of California, Volume 3, Book X, Chapter XII- Treatment of Indians (Continued). Oxford University Press. ISBN 978-0-19-506297-7. John Eicher; David Eicher (1 June 2002). Civil War High Commands. Stanford University Press. San Francisco,California: J. N. Stone. Retrieved 18 December 2012.

During the nineteenth century, Americans looked to the eventual civilization and assimilation of Native Americans through a process of removal, reservation, and directed culture change. Policies for directed subsistence change and incorporation had far-reaching social and environmental consequences for native peoples and native lands. This study explores the experiences of three groups--Northern Utes, Hupas, and Tohono O'odhams--with settled reservation and allotted agriculture in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Each group inhabited a different environment, and their cultural traditions reflected distinct subsistence adaptations to life in the western United States. Each experienced the full weight of federal agrarian policy yet responded differently, in culturally consistent ways, to subsistence change and the resulting social and environmental consequences. Attempts to establish successful agricultural economies ultimately failed as each group reproduced their own cultural values in a diminished and rapidly changing environment. In the end, such policies and agrarian experiences left Indian farmers marginally incorporated and economically dependent.
User reviews
Kezan
Great book!
Nnulam
The review below actually refers to a different book which shares the same title. The author of this book is, I understand, a Native American historian. He is also the editor of the Western Historical Quarterly. His book is an illuminating investigation of U.S.-Indian policy and the conceit that pushing agricultural modernization on Indian reservations would lead to Indian assimilation and the eradication of the "Indian problem." Lewis allows us to see concretely what these policies meant, how they were received in Indian country, and how they were modified or resisted by Indians themselves.
Datrim
I am usually suspicious of books by whites about natives that start out by criticizing other books by whites about natives, and then take the but-this-is-a-different-sort-of-book stance.
However, Nerburn is an engaging author with a genuine feel for American Indian issues, and the reader will feel this respect throughout. The book chronicles his adventures on the road with an Elder, during which he learns lessons as diverse as why there are rusting cars in front of a shack on the rez, and what the deepest significance of Wounded Knee is.
Well worth the read and the price.