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Free eBook The Moral Philosophers: An Introduction to Ethics download

by Richard Norman

Free eBook The Moral Philosophers: An Introduction to Ethics download ISBN: 0198750595
Author: Richard Norman
Publisher: Oxford University Press; 2nd ed. edition (February 2, 1984)
Language: English
Pages: 264
Category: Other
Subcategory: Humanities
Size MP3: 1828 mb
Size FLAC: 1351 mb
Rating: 4.6
Format: lrf azw txt azw


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Richard Norman is an interesting moral philosopher in his own right. His work on just war theory in this nuclear age is of note. This book, which purports to be an introductory ethics primer, is written at a rather sophisticated level - really, at one step beyond some of the more popular introductory texts - However, the thicker prose does not obviate its value. When all is said and done, one can find better introductions to the moral theories of the Greeks and Kant, but the readings on the Utilitarians, Utilitarianism, and their contemporary crtics, make the book more than worth reading, and a useful classroom text for more advanced students.

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Richard Norman introduces the thought of each figure as a coherent and comprehensive ethical theory, exploring their richness and complexity.

Richard Norman, The Moral Philosophers: An Introduction to Ethics, 2nd e. Bentham, Jeremy (2009). An Introduction to the Principles of Morals and Legislation (Dover Philosophical Classics).

Richard Norman, The Moral Philosophers: An Introduction to Ethics, 2nd ed. New York: Oxford, 1998. p. 100. ^ Mill, Utilitarianism, pp. 35-37. Dover Publications Inc. ISBN 978-0486454528. Brandt, Richard B. (1979). A Theory of the Good and the Right.

The Moral Philosophers adopts a historical approach to moral philosophy, taking in chronological sequence some of the major ethical philosophers of the past. Richard Norman introduces the thought of each figure as a coherent and comprehensive ethical theory, exploring their richness andcomplexity.

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Adopting a historical approach to moral philosophy, this clear introductory text discusses in chronological sequence the theories of major ethical philosophers. Norman redraws traditional boundaries to include not only Plato, Aristotle, Hume, Kant, and Mill, but also Hegelian ethics and the contributions of Marx and Freud to our understanding of the nature and limits of morality. Intended for undergraduates, the book is structured for use as a basic text in introductory courses on ethics.
User reviews
The Sphinx of Driz
This book came in a reasonable amount of time and was very helpful with material needed for a course I took. The supplier did indeed have it in good condition so my expectations were met. The price was also affordable and I would consider purchasing from this supplier again.
Мох
Everything A-Okay with this purchase. Using the text in a course now.
JoJolar
Richard Norman is an interesting moral philosopher in his own right. His work on just war theory in this nuclear age is of note. This book, which purports to be an introductory ethics primer, is written at a rather sophisticated level - really, at one step beyond some of the more popular introductory texts - However, the thicker prose does not obviate its value.

The book focuses on the major moral theorists (which is where, I believe, the focus ought to be in an introductory course) and gives a brief - but reasonably sufficient history of the development of moral theory. While Norman does not ignore metaethical (moral epistemic and psychological) issues, he does not delve too deeply, and he barely touches on specific applications of theory (applied ethics).

I personally, much prefer his work on the Moderns and compared with the Ancients. The chapters on Hume and Mill, where the development of utilitarianism is discussed are first rate. Also, an unsual bonus, and rather prescient on the writer's part, is the inclusion of a full chapter discussing Hegel's moral theory, rarely found in such general history of ethics approaches. Norman presents a cogent and important argument for such an inclusion. The last two chapters on contemporary ethics provide a solid and useful, if clipped and, at points, somewhat superficial, quick overview of issues in moral theory in the twentieth century.

When all is said and done, one can find better introductions to the moral theories of the Greeks and Kant, but the readings on the Utilitarians, Utilitarianism, and their contemporary crtics, make the book more than worth reading, and a useful classroom text for more advanced students.
Goll
This is a very good and surprisingly ambitious introduction to moral philosophy. In this concise book, Norman aims to acquaint readers with the essential features of important moral philosophers, provide a critical evaluation of these ideas, lead readers through the process of critically evaluating ideas, and sketching an outline of what would constitute an acceptable moral theory. The last is an aim that is well beyond the confines of most textbooks and is quite interesting. The book falls into 3 parts; the work of the Ancients - Plato and Aristotle; the now classic moderns - Hume, Kant, Mill, and Hegel (seen largely through the lens of his British disciple Bradley); and 20th century work, mainly the Anglo-American tradition. There is a chapter on Nietsche, which serves as a reminder of other possible perspectives. Norman's explications of the Ancients and 20th century work is particularly good. I find the sections on Hume and Kant less satisfactory. The quality of explanation is not as good as the other chapters. This is the one section of the book where Norman's aims of providing a critique of ideas and outlining the characteristics of an acceptable moral theory tend to overpower the strictly explanatory aim. This is not a major flaw. I think Norman also makes some small but significant errors. In his discussion of Hume's views on property, he ignores the fact that historians suggest that property had a somewhat different meaning in the 18th century, including not just possessions but also aspects of character, reputation, and even rights. I think as well that Norman is incorrect in some of his statements about the important contemporary philosopher John Rawls. Norman wants his readers to be actively engaged in thinking about this issues and his goal of outlining the grounds for an acceptable moral theory is a challenge to readers. This is an unusual but effective teaching method.