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Free eBook Liberalism, Fascism, or Social Democracy: Social Classes and the Political Origins of Regimes in Interwar Europe download

by David Collier,Seymour Martin Lipset,Gregory M. Luebbert

Free eBook Liberalism, Fascism, or Social Democracy: Social Classes and the Political Origins of Regimes in Interwar Europe download ISBN: 0195066103
Author: David Collier,Seymour Martin Lipset,Gregory M. Luebbert
Publisher: Oxford University Press; 1 edition (July 25, 1991)
Language: English
Pages: 432
Category: Other
Subcategory: Humanities
Size MP3: 1737 mb
Size FLAC: 1994 mb
Rating: 4.8
Format: rtf azw lrf doc


A devolution of liberalism à social democracy à fascism was the trend in Western Europe for those that did take on fascism (Germany, Italy, and Spain to a lesser degree).

A devolution of liberalism à social democracy à fascism was the trend in Western Europe for those that did take on fascism (Germany, Italy, and Spain to a lesser degree). Another cool truism: fascism is only possible with mass mobilization, otherwise what you have is the normal, run-of-the-mill dictatorship (like the ones that popped up in Eastern Europe during this period despite affectations otherwise). Luebbert also defines these three seemingly umbrella terms as different regime types during the interwar period by highlighting the type of identity-class coalitions that they embraced.

Seymour Martin Lipset: March 18, 1922 - December 31, 2006 American political theorist and sociologist, Seymour . Lipset has received a number of awards for his work, including the MacIver Award in 1962, the Gunnar Myrdal Prize in 1970, and the Townsend Harris Medal in 1971.

Seymour Martin Lipset: March 18, 1922 - December 31, 2006 American political theorist and sociologist, Seymour Martin Lipset, was born in New York City on March 18, 1922, and educated at City College of New York and Columbia University. Lipset taught at a number of universities, including the University of Toronto, Columbia University, the University of California at Berkeley, Harvard University, and Stanford University. Lipset died on December 31, 2006, as a result of complications following a stroke.

Classes and the Political Origins of Regimes in Interwar Europe.

Liberalism, Fascism, or Social Democracy: Social Classes and the Political Origins of Regimes in Interwar Europe. Arguing that the evolution of most Western European nations into liberal democracies, social democracies, or fascist regimes was attributable to a discrete set of social class alliances, the author explores the origins and outcomes of the political development in the individual nations.

1 online resource (xi, 416 pages). This work provides a sweeping historical analysis of the political development of Western Europe in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century.

Gregory M. Luebbert, David Collier, Seymour Martin Lipset. Gregory M. Luebbert, David Collier, Seymour Martin Lipset," The Journal of Modern History 66, no. 2 (Ju. 1994): 360-363. Of all published articles, the following were the most read within the past 12 months. Going for an Indian : South Asian Restaurants and the Limits of Multiculturalism in Britain. Mistakes and Myths: The Allies, Germany, and the Versailles Treaty, 1918–1921.

Start by marking Liberalism, Fascism, or Social Democracy: Social .

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In countries with a strong, cohesive working class and a fractured middle class, Luebbert points out, a liberal solution was impossible.

This work provides a sweeping historical analysis of the political development of Western Europe in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century. In countries with a strong, cohesive working class and a fractured middle class, Luebbert points out, a liberal solution was impossible.

Liberalism, Fascism, or Social Democracy : Social Classes and the Political Origins of Regimes in. .

Liberalism, Fascism, or Social Democracy : Social Classes and the Political Origins of Regimes in Interwar Europe. by Seymour Martin Lipset, Gregory M. Luebbert, David Collier.

Seymour martin lipset. University of California, Berkeley. The conditions associated with the existence and stability of democratic society have been a leading concern of political philosophy.

This work provides a sweeping historical analysis of the political development of Western Europe in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century. Arguing that the evolution of most Western European nations into liberal democracies, social democracies, or fascist regimes was attributable to a discrete set of social class alliances, the author explores the origins and outcomes of the political development in the individual nations. In Britain, France, and Switzerland, countries with a unified middle class, liberal forces established political hegemony before World War I. By coopting considerable sections of the working class with reforms that weakened union movements, liberals essentially excluded the fragmented working class from the political process, remaining in power throughout the inter-war period. In countries with a strong, cohesive working class and a fractured middle class, Luebbert points out, a liberal solution was impossible. In Norway, Sweden, Denmark, and Czechoslovakia, political coalitions of social democrats and the "family peasantry" emerged as a result of the First World War, leading to social democratic governments. In Italy, Spain, and Germany, on the other hand, the urban middle class united with a peasantry hostile to socialism to facilitate the rise of fascism.