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Free eBook Normandy 1944: A Young Rifleman's War download

by Dick Stodghill

Free eBook Normandy 1944: A Young Rifleman's War download ISBN: 1424149134
Author: Dick Stodghill
Publisher: PublishAmerica; First Edition edition (July 31, 2006)
Language: English
Pages: 299
Category: Other
Subcategory: Humanities
Size MP3: 1758 mb
Size FLAC: 1470 mb
Rating: 4.6
Format: docx lrf rtf mbr


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Dick Stodghill's "Normandy 1944" is the most undeniable story of a rifleman in combat. Dick gives the glimpses of August 1944. As a student of International student's perspective this is surely a rare book. This is his book "Normandy 1944: A Young Rifleman's War".

Items related to Normandy 1944: A Young Rifleman's War. Stodghill, Dick Normandy 1944: A Young Rifleman's War. ISBN 13: 9781424149131. Normandy 1944: A Young Rifleman's War. Stodghill, Dick.

Normandy 1944 : A Young Rifleman’s War’ by Dick Stodghill. Stodghill writes only a little about his background but it is quite interesting, he recalls playing ‘war’ with friends, some of whom later died in actual battle. PublishAmerica, Baltimore, 2006, Paperback, 299 pages. He entered the army, endured the sometimes incomprehensible basic training before being separated from his friends and posted to a replacement unit in England shortly before D-Day. His annoyance with this system reflects what Pagliaro wrote about his experiences.

Michael Bilder was drafted into the army over a year before Pearl Harbor, so by the time he enters Normandy in early July 1944 he has had quite a bit of training.

3 people found this helpful. Michael Bilder was drafted into the army over a year before Pearl Harbor, so by the time he enters Normandy in early July 1944 he has had quite a bit of training. He served with the 5th Infantry Division, mostly with the 2nd Infantry Regt's 2nd battalion.

Электронная книга "D-Day: The Invasion of Normandy, 1944 ", Rick Atkinson. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "D-Day: The Invasion of Normandy, 1944 " для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

This is a list of Allied forces in the Normandy campaign between 6 June and 25 August 1944. Koninklijke Nederlandse Brigade "Prinses Irene" ("Princess Irene Brigade"). Three motorised infantry companies. One reconnaissance battalion. One artillery battery. three Naval ships HNLMS Soemba, HNLMS Sumatra and HNLMS Flores.

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A young German soldier, 1944. I'm going too say 12th SS in Normandy. This pciture is taken probably by the end of the war when really young and old citizens were enlisted for soldiers. Most likely a member of the 12th SS Panzer Division Hitlerjugend which sustained 43% casualties during the Normandy campaign. A recommend book on this topic is The 12th SS: The History of the Hitler Youth Panzer Division – Volume 1 and 2 by Hubert Meyer. Although the helmet and smock are plane tree camo which was used throughout the war.

This is the Battle of Normandy, neither glamorized nor sanitized, as seen from ground level during the bloody summer of 1944—the personal experiences of an 18-year-old 4th Infantry Division rifleman who joined his company shortly after D-Day

This is the Battle of Normandy, neither glamorized nor sanitized, as seen from ground level during the bloody summer of 1944—the personal experiences of an 18-year-old 4th Infantry Division rifleman who joined his company shortly after D-Day. He quickly came to admire and respect the men of G Company, then was close by as one by one many of them died during the horrific fighting in the fields and streets of a normally beautiful and tranquil land

This is the Battle of Normandy, neither glamorized nor sanitized, as seen from ground level during the bloody summer of 1944—the personal experiences of an 18-year-old 4th Infantry Division rifleman who joined his company shortly after D-Day. He quickly came to admire and respect the men of G Company, then was close by as one by one many of them died during the horrific fighting in the fields and streets of a normally beautiful and tranquil land. Here are the realities of that war: opening the casualty blanket rolls, seeing the dead being buried in mattress covers, the sounds, the smells and the fears of men in infantry combat. A glimpse, too, of the boys who fought the battles of World War II as they grew up or matured during the Great Depression, the rigors of infantry basic training, life in England in the weeks leading up to D-Day.
User reviews
Yggdi
This is exceptional! Stodghill was an 18 year old replacement to G Co, 2nd Btn, 12th Infantry Regt of the 4th Infantry Division arriving just after D-Day. His account is a comprehensive insight into the life of an infantry soldier in the hedgerow fighting over 2 months.

Stodghill writes only a little about his background but it is quite interesting, he recalls playing `war' with friends, some of whom later died in actual battle. He entered the army, endured the sometimes incomprehensible basic training before being separated from his friends and posted to a replacement unit in England shortly before D-Day. Stodghill is a professional writer and it shows from the start. Once he leaves for the front the description of events just draws you in. The Channel crossing and his march to his unit are fascinating. His observations of destroyed vehicles and buildings but also of the effects of war on the farm animals are remarkable. These increase in sharpness as he nears the fighting and begins to encounter the dead. It is one of the best introductions to the front I have ever read.

Joining his unit is jarring. No one properly receives him or even assigns him to a squad. He is left to just fit in as he can. It is fascinating to read of his realisation that the tactics taught at boot camp were largely obsolete and how he actively set out to learn how to survive, firstly by closely observing his veteran NCOs, but also through watching the Germans. As for combat - it is here in spades and Stodghill provides unusual clarity. He graphically reveals the realities of being in a frontal assault across an open field, of the complexities of operating in the hedgerows, and how absolute weariness compounded everything and led to many deaths in itself. There is also much that was new, for instance unwritten mutually observed rules about hedgerow combat, like when grenades were not to be used. Out of combat he was assigned to process the casualty rolls (killed soldiers bed rolls) and this was a wrenching and for us, eye opening duty.

There is quite a lot of criticism of his own army. He is disparaging of army leadership, most notably Collins. This is not just due to the dearth of tactical understanding and general incompetence (post war he is astonished at the inaccuracy of unit rosters and he is damning of the practice of keeping troops in the line for months without rest) but also their out of touch attitudes regarding battle and morale, Patton is particularly derided on this score.

In contrast to his criticism of American tactics, Stodghill is impressed by those of the Germans. He served against Panzer Lehr, 6th FJR and writes almost in awe of 17th SS Pz Gr. It's partly due to post war research and discussions with German veterans but he knows his stuff. He comments favourably on `Overlord' by Max Hastings in terms of German military professionalism and he adds his own thoughts and anecdotes. He writes of how the green 83rd Division shot Germans trying to surrender and how he stumbled across an astonishing example of the retribution taken against them.

As far as combat specifics, he has some incredible experiences. A number of very close shaves (he is the only one I've found who received an injury at close quarters), actions with tanks, attack by a Tiger, astonishing ripostes by the Germans, being lured into ambushes, the giddy feeling of realising he was in a minefield and being attacked by the Luftwaffe. There are atrocities and unexpected moments of civility. Although it was clear he had done so, he hardly ever wrote about killing an enemy. The one time he was specific, I had to put the book down for a while. It was harrowing.

A powerful element of his story is how he describes his comrades. He writes extensively of some, with full names and other details, in particular the sergeants, most of whom were outstanding. He humanises them, explains their qualities and lauds their bravery, so their fates hit home just that little bit harder. He also reveals how they and he were dehumanised as well and he recounts a particularly savage `joke' he himself played on a dying German. It is an incredibly honest account.

Though it appears he served throughout the Western campaign, he writes only of his experiences in Normandy, culminating at Mortain. This last fight strangely, the most awful of all, is described in just a chapter, in a blur. And in an odd way, I was grateful, his experiences in Normandy were so intense, for a change I was quite content for it to be left at that.

Stodghill reveals better than almost anyone the humanity of those caught up in conflict. He doesn't write much about killing but he says an enormous amount about real men he saw killed. Sure some were cowards or incompetents or brutes but so many had worth and their horrible deaths were a tragic waste. In some ways it is overwhelming but it is also engrossing, it is one of the few books that I truly couldn't put down. It is a very full memoir in many ways. It really drags the reader along and it is a sometimes shattering ride. It probably deserved a more evocative title but if I had to pick three US ETO memoirs to recommend, this would be one of them.
Very Highly Recommended!
Matty
1944 Normandy: A Young Rifleman's War is a first rate account of a young infantryman's experience in World War Two. It is clearly written and edited very well. The work is destined to be a classic in the field first person accounts of the war.

In some ways the book has a slow build, and the author isn't terribly specific about his actions during the time he faced the enemy. But it gradually changes in perspective to where he is more than just a participant, but an active part of what he writes about.

Of particular note, are the descriptions of Operation Cobra, and the use of air support in combined attacks on German troops. This is the only book I know of that goes into detail regarding this type of operation and this particular event. I also enjoyed his observations of the German soldier in combat as far as quality and specifically what units he fought against.

My only criticism of book concerns the fact he skips through the last major battle. It is truly the crucible of battles he faced in Normandy...and in some ways the lack of detail only makes it stand out as a hell of a battle.

In many ways, this book reminds of Don Burgett's outstanding series of books regarding his first hand experience in the war. Both soldiers fought in Normandy and saw more than enough to last a life time. Both came from modest backgrounds and were very young when they entered the war.

The great news is this is a recent publication and another example of an outstanding personal memoir. It's my hope that the author is going to follow this book up with the rest of the story regarding his war time experience. Quite frankly, I can't wait!

If you enjoyed this book, I would suggest reading Roll me over in the Clover, Company Commander, and If You Survive by George Wilson.
Owomed
This is easily one of the best memoirs from a combat soldier, in any war, that I have ever read (and I've read many!). It is probably the best Normandy memoir, with the possible exception of "Other Clay" by C. Cawthon. But where Cawthon's bk. and others cover the Normandy Campaign and then move through the war as the bk. progresses (giving more or less coverage to Normandy), Stodghill focuses the entire bk. on his experiences in Normandy with the 4th Infantry Division, from the beginning to the Falaise Gap. It is rich with details, anecdotes and stories that military history readers will find fascinating and useful. Best of all, perhaps, is that it is pleasantly readable! The author became a writer by profession after the war and knows his craft. You will find it very hard to put down. My only regret is that it is published in paperback. I expect to refer to it over and over again, and a hard-bound copy would be more durable. In spite of this, I highly recommend it.
Nagis
The most honest story of WWII that I have ever read. It does not dwell on heroics but tells a story as it really happened. The author is brilliant in the way he describes the realities of war and of the fighting man. The drudgery and treachery of war comes alive in the telling. The shortcomings of leadership and downright incompetence of some are not spared from the pen. Respect and even compassion at times for the enemy is unusual in a story of this nature. Dick Stodghill has made a lasting impression on me. He is what a real soldier is made of. He loathed what he had to do, but did his duty for his country.
Daigrel
This book is highly unusual. The reason it is unusual is Stodghill has the unique ability to take you with him. When you read this book it is not like reading a book, it is as though you are there going through it all with him. When I finish it, my husband who is an avid World War 11

buff will digest it and then our friend who is an absolute World War 11

obsessor will read it. This is a classic and I am proud to own it.