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Free eBook Seven Myths of the Spanish Conquest download

by Matthew Restall

Free eBook Seven Myths of the Spanish Conquest download ISBN: 0195176111
Author: Matthew Restall
Publisher: Oxford University Press; 1 edition (October 28, 2004)
Language: English
Pages: 240
Category: Other
Subcategory: Humanities
Size MP3: 1816 mb
Size FLAC: 1552 mb
Rating: 4.8
Format: rtf lrf lrf doc


Seven Myths of the Spanish Conquest is a 2003 work by ethnohistorian Matthew Restall in which he posits that there are seven myths about the Spanish colonization of the Americas that have come to be widely believed to be true.

Seven Myths of the Spanish Conquest is a 2003 work by ethnohistorian Matthew Restall in which he posits that there are seven myths about the Spanish colonization of the Americas that have come to be widely believed to be true. Working within the tradition of New Philology, Restall questions several notions which he claims are widely held myths about how the Spanish achieved military and cultural hegemony in Latin America.

-Jennifer Jobb, Against the Current. Restall's provocative analysis, wide-ranging scholarship and lucid prose make this a stimulating contribution to the debate on one of history's great watersheds. Restall explores this strategy by a series of chapters addressing his "myths. In chapter one, Restall points out that it was not a "handful of adventurers" that conquered the Americas. It was a handful of adventurers backed by huge numbers of native allies.

Restall seems to be simultaneously addressing popular misconceptions and historical misinterpretations of the Spanish conquest

Restall seems to be simultaneously addressing popular misconceptions and historical misinterpretations of the Spanish conquest. His information is generally accurate and his book provides valuable context for the interested amateur, but sometimes his tone toward those misconceptions is overly hostile and may be off-putting for those readers who legitimately wanted to correct their misconceptions. Matthew Restall’s book is an exploration of some of the myths-he explores seven-that have grown up about the conquest, identifying their fallacies: 1) The myth of the exceptional man.

Home Browse Books Book details, Seven Myths of the Spanish Conquest. Using a wide array of sources, historian Matthew Restall highlights seven key myths, uncovering the source of the inaccuracies and exploding the fallacies and misconceptions behind each myth. Seven Myths of the Spanish Conquest.

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Using a wide array of sources, historian Matthew Restall highlights seven key myths, uncovering the source of the inaccuracies and exploding the fallacies and misconceptions behind each myth. Here is an intriguing exploration of the ways in which the history of the Spanish Conquest has been misread and passed down to become popular knowledge of these events.

Restall, Matthew, Seven Myths of The Spanish Conquest (New York, 2004).

In travelogues, there was always a self-awareness at play and performance of heroic grandeur. Restall, Matthew, Seven Myths of The Spanish Conquest (New York, 2004). How does an understanding of the role of myth.

Oxford university press. At its most basic level, the book juxtaposes false and accurate descriptions of the Conquest. 5 But the book is also more than that. This page intentionally left blank. D. of the Spanish Conquest. Auckland Bangkok Buenos Aires Cape Town Chennai.

Here is an intriguing exploration of the ways in which the history of the Spanish Conquest has been misread and passed down to become popular knowledge of these events. The book offers a fresh account of the activities of the best-known conquistadors and explorers, including Columbus, Cortés, and Pizarro. Using a wide array of sources, historian Matthew Restall highlights seven key myths, uncovering the source of the inaccuracies and exploding the fallacies and misconceptions behind each myth. This vividly written and authoritative book shows, for instance, that native Americans did not take the conquistadors for gods and that small numbers of vastly outnumbered Spaniards did not bring down great empires with stunning rapidity. We discover that Columbus was correctly seen in his lifetime--and for decades after--as a briefly fortunate but unexceptional participant in efforts involving many southern Europeans. It was only much later that Columbus was portrayed as a great man who fought against the ignorance of his age to discover the new world. Another popular misconception--that the Conquistadors worked alone--is shattered by the revelation that vast numbers of black and native allies joined them in a conflict that pitted native Americans against each other. This and other factors, not the supposed superiority of the Spaniards, made conquests possible.The Conquest, Restall shows, was more complex--and more fascinating--than conventional histories have portrayed it. Seven Myths of the Spanish Conquest offers a richer and more nuanced account of a key event in the history of the Americas.
User reviews
Ranicengi
Matthew Restall's "Seven Myths of the Spanish Conquest" is an illuminating introduction to the Conquest of the Americas. The value of Restall's book is that it provides a broad overview of the facts, circumstances and personalities of the Conquest while diving deeper into particular "myths" around which Restall organizes his book.

Although he calls his chapters "myths," it isn't clear to me that these are myths in the sense that they are erroneous things that people think about when they think of the Spanish Conquest. A lot of the myths are things that we don't normally think about at all, albeit if pushed to take a position, we might adopt the "mythicist" position sketched by Restall. For example, not all conquistadors were white, some were Africans who transitioned from slave to successful conquistadors while enslaved. This is a fascinating bit of history, particularly fascinating in the idea that a person from a sub-Saharan African tribe could make his way successfully into a completely alien culture. Is there a myth that all Conquistadors were white? I suspect that the answer is that most people just haven't thought about the subject.

What we get from Restall's book is that the Conquistadors, generally acting as entrepreneurial free companies with only the most limited backing of their sovereign, had perfected a technique of conquest, which basically involved descending on the next likely looking territory, enlisting native allies, capturing the native leader and massacring natives where necessary. The strategy worked like gang-busters, particularly when aided along by the introduction of European diseases that killed off 90% of the native population.

To the natives, it must have looked like the end of the world.

Restall explores this strategy by a series of chapters addressing his "myths." In chapter one, Restall points out that it was not a "handful of adventurers" that conquered the Americas. It was a handful of adventurers backed by huge numbers of native allies. In chapter two, Restall points out that the conquistadors were not armies of the King. They were usually scratch troops put together on the spot of whoever was feeling like making a fortune. In chapter three, Restall introduces the reader to the African slaves who made up a substantial portion of the Spanish forces. In chapter four, Restall explains the idea of the completion of the Conquest was overstated; there were free Mayan groups in the Yucatan into the Twentieth Century. Chapter five discusses the asymmetry of communication. The Spanish were fortunate to find native speakers who could communicate with the Spanish. Thus, Cortez spoke to a shipwrecked Spaniard who spoke a Mayan language, who in turn spoke to Malinche - the Aztec princess who became Cortez' mistress - who could speak to the Aztecs. The Aztecs and other natives did not have that kind of access to the intelligence that knowing the other's language provided. In chapter six, Restall disputes the myth that the Indians were totally and utterly destroyed by the Conquest. The seventh chapter discusses why there should be such mythic understandings of the Conquest, i.e., outmanned adventurers conquering mighty civilizations by sheer cultural superiority.

This is a good book for those who are looking for an introduction to the subject. I read this book while listening to the Teaching Company lecture series on the Conquest of the Americas. I heartily recommend that combination as a way getting immersed in this important but often forgotten studied bit of history.
Mozel
"Seven Myths" is one of the most important pieces of revisionist history with respect to how the Spanish pressed their conquest of those parts of the Americas that came under their influence. It challenges and gives nuance to the standard narrative at almost every turn. One must know that narrative, as told, for instance, by Hugh Thomas in Conquest, in order to appreciate the depth of research that went into the "Seven Myths" and the changes in perspective it demands of those desiring to understand how history changing was the encounter between Europe and the Americas. The bibliography is definitive up to the time of publication.
Zulurr
As a history major in college I have found this book intriguing in its perceptions of how we humans would like to view ourselves versus what actually dictates the perception of ourselves and reception of others culturally.

As a person of mixed descent by result of the "Colombian exchange" I found the book to give more possibilities in the origins of American cultures and familial histories. It is surely a book to be taken into pondering
Yellow Judge
Excellent book!!!! I had to but this for my class turns out it really is not a bad book. If you love history this book is a must read for you.
Made-with-Love
A different approach to the history of the conquest of the Aztec Empire by Cortez. If the reader has studied the history as presented in other writing, this will give him/her a new angle to contemplate.
Umge
Great book as a pro/con point of view of the historical content of the Spanish conquest of the Inca empire.
Xtintisha
This is an excellent book that shows other aspects of the conquest, that will enrich the information about this time.
I have not even finished reading yet but had to write a review. I travel extensively and for all these years the Spanish conquest of Americas never made sense to me. A few hundred people against tens of thousands ; even with all the illness that was brought with them; even with the stories about the Spanish being viewed as gods; even with the muscat and the wheel and the alphabet; even with the inherent white supremacy of the theory of the intelligence of the conquistadors... it just did not make sense to me. Read this book and suddenly it starts to make sense. Thank you.