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Free eBook Creating the New Egyptian Woman: Consumerism, Education, and National Identity, 1863-1922 download

by M. Russell

Free eBook Creating the New Egyptian Woman: Consumerism, Education, and National Identity, 1863-1922 download ISBN: 1403962626
Author: M. Russell
Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan; 1st edition (November 13, 2004)
Language: English
Pages: 237
Category: Other
Subcategory: Humanities
Size MP3: 1288 mb
Size FLAC: 1349 mb
Rating: 4.9
Format: mbr lrf rtf docx


A "New Woman" was announced in Egypt at the turn of the nineteenth century. This book discusses and debates the place of Egyptian women, while focusing on consumerism and education.

A "New Woman" was announced in Egypt at the turn of the nineteenth century. With a new genre of prescriptive literature, new products, a new education, and a physically changed home, she increasingly emerged in public life. This book discusses and debates the place of Egyptian women, while focusing.

Mona Russell’s book, Creating the New Egyptian Woman, should be considered a primary resource on. .The book provides an in depth analysis of Egypt as it pertains to the Egyptian woman during the 1863-1922 time period.

Mona Russell’s book, Creating the New Egyptian Woman, should be considered a primary resource on the changing social and cultural base of Egypt in the late 19th to early 20th century. Dr. Russell is a highly qualified authority on the topic. While not living during the time period, much of her professional career has focused on the subject. It analyzes consumerism, education, and national identity during the period.

S STUDIES and reshaped new definitions of womanhood and the difference between Western and Egyptian advertising, as the latter addressed or accommo-dated secluded and partially secluded women.  Journal Of Middle East.

Mobile version (beta). Creating the New Egyptian Woman: Consumerism, Education, and National Identity, 1863-1922. Download (pdf, . 0 Mb) Donate Read. Epub FB2 mobi txt RTF. Converted file can differ from the original. If possible, download the file in its original format. Russell sheds much-needed light on the strugg A "New Woman" was announced in Egypt at the turn of the nineteenth century.

This button opens a dialog that displays additional images for this product with the option to zoom in or out. Tell us if something is incorrect. Creating the New Egyptian Woman : Consumerism, Education, and National Identity, 1863-1922. A close examination of the interaction of new intellectual currents with indigenous concepts of morality and virtue, through the prism of changing ideals of womenhood A close examination of the interaction of new intellectual currents with indigenous concepts of morality and virtue, through the prism of changing ideals of womenhood.

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Creating the New Egyptian Woman: Consumerism, Education, and National Identity, 1863-1922. "NS-Frauenwarte: Paper of the National Socialist Women's League". "German Propaganda Archive". p. 58. ISBN 978-1-4039-7961-2. Retrieved 1 October 2014. Earl L. Sullivan (1 January 1986). Women in Egyptian Public Life. Syracuse University Press. Retrieved 5 November 2014. Betty Friedan, Who Ignited Cause in 'Feminine Mystique,' Dies at 85 - The New York Times, February 5, 2006. Addison, Heather; Goodwin-Kelly, Mary Kate; Roth, Elaine (2009). Motherhood misconceived: representing the maternal in .

Mona Russell - Creating the New Egyptian Woman: Consumerism, Education, and National Identity, 1863-1922. Читать pdf. Monaldi Rita, Sorti Francesco - Veritas. Monaldi Rita, Sorti Francesco. Ramona R. Rush, Carol E. Oukrop, Pamela J. Creedon - Seeking Equity for Women in Journalism and Mass Communication Education: A 30-year Update (Lea's Communication Series). Creedon.

A "New Woman" was announced in Egypt at the turn of the nineteenth century. With a new genre of prescriptive literature, new products, a new education, and a physically changed home, she increasingly emerged in public life. This book discusses and debates the place of Egyptian women, while focusing on consumerism and education. Russell sheds much-needed light on the struggle for identity in Egypt at a time of considerable flux and tension and provides a powerful angle to explore changing concepts of social dynamics and broader debates of what it meant to be "modern" while retaining local authenticity.
User reviews
Kuve
Mona Russell’s book, Creating the New Egyptian Woman, should be considered a primary resource on the changing social and cultural base of Egypt in the late 19th to early 20th century. Dr. Russell is a highly qualified authority on the topic. While not living during the time period, much of her professional career has focused on the subject.

Dr. Russell has performed extensive doctoral research in Cairo. She has been privileged enough to be a student of Nawal el-Saadawi, in Egyptian Women’s Studies. Dr. Saadawi is one of the most important, outspoken, and influential women to be part of the feminist movement in modern Egypt. Dr. Russell has received her Ph.D. from Georgetown in 1998, and teaches “The Politics of Identity in the Middle East” at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

The book provides an in depth analysis of Egypt as it pertains to the Egyptian woman during the 1863-1922 time period. It analyzes consumerism, education, and national identity during the period. Dr. Russell spends time to explain what it means to progress from an “old” Egyptian woman, and how time instituted change to create the “New Egyptian Woman”.

She begins by explaining the influence of Ismail on Egyptian development, and how his influences shaped the modern nation. After discussing why Western influences began to pervade Egyptian society, patterns in urban consumption and development are analyzed. She takes into account how the modernization of the country, with its new rail lines, telegraphs, and improved transportation methods have provided a medium by which the ideas of change may spread, so that the New Egyptian could spread from the urban centers to other areas of the country.

Advertising is analyzed and compared to Western models to show how women are encouraged to take up the role of the family purchasing agent, and how this produced changes in society as the boundaries between public and private began to blur. The advent of the women’s press is shown to be a direct influence upon women during the time, a direct way to communicate with them, and an influence in the development of al-Sayyida al-Istihlakiyya.

The next chapter focuses on the similarities and differences between the New Egyptian Woman and her “Western Sisters”. Differences in culture meant that women in different societies had dissimilar interest to address. While issues were shared in common it is shown that the Egyptian women’s movement had key other issues to address such as polygamy.

The second half of the book focuses on the education of the New Woman. Issues that are addressed are the differences in educating women to be not only mothers and wives, but also to be workers in the reforming Egyptian society. The expansion in opportunities for female education in the early 20th century is explained in detail, and how gender and class affected those opportunities. The effect of the British on the education system in Egypt is discussed, and how they attempted to utilize it to the benefit of the occupation.

The conclusion of the book ties all the aspects of consumerism, education, and national identity together in a concise, flowing analysis of Egypt during the time period. I personally am impressed by the excellent use of period sources throughout this book. Dr. Russell has proven herself to be at the forefront of resources on the subject.

While Egyptian feminism, and the development of the New Egyptian Woman, has not been at the forefront of my interest, Dr. Russell’s book has enlightened me to the importance of women in the society of Egypt during the late 19th and early 20th century. I would recommend this book to anyone who is interested in the topic, or anyone who is interested in Egyptian history in general. This book is sure to not leave you disappointed.
Dranar
In Mona Russell's book, Creating the New Egyptian Woman, she explains the complex ways of modernization in Egypt that affects the changes in both the status and the behavior of the women in this time period. No matter what class these women are in they still had to balance the new and the old ways of life in Egypt. The declaration of a "New Egyptian Woman" was an idea that was still new to the many other Middle Eastern countries; in some of these countries today women are still wearing either yashmaks or Hijjabs. In this time period, the women were actually extremely more advanced than a number of Middle Eastern countries are today.

Russell's parents really encouraged her work because both of them had been very well educated and had received their doctorates and therefore encouraged the same for her. She received her doctorate in history. As a result of her mother's Arabic speech, she learned how to speak it as well and as a result it proved beneficial because she did her doctorate research at the American research center in Cairo. Had it not been for the women's rights movement, that took place, there would never have been a way for Mona to be in the position she is in today. One of the first Egyptian women to receive a degree was Huda Shaarawi, an Egyptian women's rights activist. Following in her footsteps, Mona received her doctorate and taught at the American University of Cairo, the University of Massachusetts - Amherst and at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. She is most certainly an expert on the topic since she was born and raised in Cairo and has first had knowledge of this occurrence in the history of her country. Mona Russell makes a significant contribution to our understanding of the complex ways modernization affected changes in the status and behavior of urban women in nineteenth- and early-twentieth-century Egypt. One vital theme that Russell weaves throughout her book is the way new and old ideas and institutions persisted side by side for as long as they did, sometimes harmoniously but often not. Whether she belonged to the upper class or the middle class, the New Woman found she locked into class that was caught in-between the new and the old. It is a fresh take on the important subject of what it means to be 'modern' in the Middle East.

I really appreciate the acknowledgements page, it lead me to understand her even more than I did through reading the book. She takes the reader through her doctoral process and explains where she studied and such. I was very impressed in the notes on Transliteration and Translation page, because she read the same articles in French and Arabic before translating them herself. Not only does this act make her incredibly smart, but definitely makes her knowledgeable on the issue. I also liked the introduction which was very interesting and introduced the book very well. The notes pages were very detailed, making them easy to follow and the abbreviations page supplemented them very well. I wasn't very sure who the picture on the front of the book was, but at first I thought it was Russell but I think the pictures are too old to be her, so I assume that maybe they are just Egyptian women from the nineteenth century, maybe even her grandmother. Either way, they are a very nice touch for the book, giving the reader a visual image.

There is no limit to who can benefit from this book. I think women would especially find it interesting if they are interested in women's liberation or also if they have an Egyptian lineage. Historians definitely would be interested in it. Judging by the title, one would assume that the book is about women only, but in reality the book discusses many aspects of Egyptian life in the nineteenth century and shows a general picture of the time period and how the women fit into history.