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by Louis Rosen

Free eBook The South Side: The Racial Transformation of an American Neighborhood download ISBN: 1566631904
Author: Louis Rosen
Publisher: Ivan R. Dee; First Edition edition (July 1, 1998)
Language: English
Pages: 189
Category: Other
Subcategory: Humanities
Size MP3: 1818 mb
Size FLAC: 1864 mb
Rating: 4.6
Format: lit docx mobi lrf


A powerful and moving story of the racial transformation of an American neighborhood, told in. .Louis Rosen grew up in the Pill Hill neighborhood on the South Side of Chicago. In the 1960s Pill Hill and the surrounding area was a white Jewish and other ethnic neighborhood

A powerful and moving story of the racial transformation of an American neighborhood, told in memoir and oral narrative. It deserves to become a classic. This text needs to be understood and performed at least as regularly as Thornton Wilder's Our Town. In the 1960s Pill Hill and the surrounding area was a white Jewish and other ethnic neighborhood. By the mid-1960s, some of the white Jewish families were moving out (usually "up" to bigger houses in the suburbs) and black lower-middle class families began moving in (as they too looked to move up from old neighborhoods).

Louis Rosen documented the racial transition of this and nearby communities in his 1998 book The South Side: The Racial Transformation of.Today, South Deering is a primarily black and Latino neighborhood, with some elderly white ethnic residents remaining.

Louis Rosen documented the racial transition of this and nearby communities in his 1998 book The South Side: The Racial Transformation of an American Neighborhood. The average household income is 43% below the average for the city of Chicago as a whole, and about 25% of the population lives in poverty. Crime is somewhat higher than average, but South Deering has been spared the worst violence that has plagued nearby neighborhoods such as Pullman and South Chicago.

Read "The South Side The Racial Transformation of an American Neighborhood" by Louis . Books related to The South Side.

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Louis Rosen has made nothing up: the memories, thoughts, and feelings of the characters reflect exactly what was spoken during his extensive interviews. The names are fictional, but The South Side is essentially a work of nonfiction

Louis Rosen has made nothing up: the memories, thoughts, and feelings of the characters reflect exactly what was spoken during his extensive interviews. The names are fictional, but The South Side is essentially a work of nonfiction. The South Side is a story without obvious heroes or villains.

A powerful and moving story of the racial transformation of an American neighborhood, told in memoir and oral . Published by Thriftbooks. com User, 11 years ago. Neighborhoods are created by groups of individuals, usually of the same ethnic background.

A powerful and moving story of the racial transformation of an American neighborhood, told in memoir and oral narrative. How a group grows internally, is because of there culture, religion, and political beliefs. When their (groups) stronghold, or sacred ground is challenged, fear then takes over.

Location & Availability for: The South Side : the racial transformati.

Main Author: Rosen, Louis. Published: Chicago : . Location & Availability for: The South Side : the racial transformati. YouTube Encyclopedic. Slag Valley Transportation. South Deering is served by a number of CTA bus routes

Bibliographic Details  . We guarantee the condition of every book as it's described on the Abebooks web sites.

Bibliographic Details Publisher: Ivan R. Dee, Chicago. Book Condition: Very Good. Shipping Terms: Shipping costs are based on books weighing . LB, or 1 KG.

To most Americans, Mississippi is not a state but a scar, the place where segregation took its ugliest form and struck most savagely . The South Side: The Racial Transformation of an American Neighborhood.

To most Americans, Mississippi is not a state but a scar, the place where segregation took its ugliest form and struck most savagely at its challengers. But to many Americans, Mississippi is also home.

A powerful and moving story of the racial transformation of an American neighborhood, told in memoir and oral narrative. It deserves to become a classic....This text needs to be understood and performed at least as regularly as Thornton Wilder's Our Town. —Sandy Primm, St. Louis Post-Dispatch
User reviews
Gholbirdred
I lived there & I went thru the change shortly after I got back home from the ARMY . My father built our big 2 story Georgian frame house by himself,1949 to 1951,IN the PRAIRIE! Rosen remembers the area as it once was , it "Was" a great place to grow up . WE moved out in 1970 because The gangs were starting to take over with the robbing , drugs , rape & murdering & ALL, going on on the south side.I'am not jewish , many of my friends & neighbors were , I also went to Warren school when it was a large gothic 4 story building & "was" a great school!.I remember South shore when it was a "great" place to live."I would "not" live there now"!!ROSEN DIDN'T GET THE WHOLE STORY OF WHY THE PEOPLE MOVED OUT!! There was a lot more going on than his book tells!!
Jia
Not very good.
JOGETIME
Having grown up in "The Manor" during it's good days (mid 50's through mid late 60's) indeed there were so many wonderful things to talk about growing up dealing with the South Shore and SE Side in general. But indeed things were headed downhill by 67. I was about to be entering Bowen High School which from the experiences of my older brother who had been there a year, it was fraught with many a rough edge. My parents didn't want me exposed to that so when my parents best friends moved to the North Shore that summer, my parents also sold our home and we relocated to the North Shore for the beginning of my High School. Unlike some of my counterparts, that felt somehow ripped from their beloved neighborhood, I felt "liberated". I came out of my shell, joined a rock band in school and had many more friends. Indeed I left the South Side behind and keep my good memories in my head filtering out the bad. My last CTA bus trip in the spring of 67 2 drunk black guys got on the bus as we went through Hyde Park. One grabbed me by the throat and called me some very unsavory names (at the ripe age of 13). I fortunately survived that experience. So my later memories of the South Side were it was headed downhill fast. You can romanticize it all you wish, it is certainly was NOT glorious any further beyond that point. Needless to say 1968 with the death of MLK was the nail in the coffin.
Nettale
Louis Rosen grew up in the Pill Hill neighborhood on the South Side of Chicago. In the 1960s Pill Hill and the surrounding area was a white Jewish and other ethnic neighborhood. By the mid-1960s, some of the white Jewish families were moving out (usually "up" to bigger houses in the suburbs) and black lower-middle class families began moving in (as they too looked to move up from old neighborhoods). The gradual change of the mid-1960s became a virtual stampede after the 1968 race riots, and even though Rosen's family did not leave until 1975, by mid-1969 the old, idyllic neighborhood of Rosen's youth was essentially gone.
Rosen has not written an historical or sociological study of why neighborhoods change, how unscrupulous real estate agents pray on white fears, or why integration did not take hold in this particular neighborhood. Instead, he has given us an impressionistic, quasi-literary study of the experiences of children and adults, principally from the Jewish but also from the African-American community. The most troubling aspect of the book is that all of the people interviewed by Rosen (his book is presented as a composite of their voices) seem to have been people of goodwill, trying to do the right thing, yet somehow at that time and place they were not able to address each other's fears and build an integrated community. We get a few tantalizing hints as to reasons for this phenomenon -- fear and racism among some of the Jews (not spelled out in detail), divisions within the Jewish community that had nothing to do with the changing racial composition of the community, a feeling on the part of African-American that it was not their place to ease fears or involve themselves with their white neighbors. It would have been interesting to hear more from some of the Jews who left in early in the process, who felt pressured by real estate agents and who left in the middle of the night, instead of just from people who (at least initially) tried to stay.
Because Rosen was a member of a Jewish community that no longer exists, the overriding impression of book leaves is one of loss -- a golden childhood, a perfect community, lost forever, to which Rosen can never hope to return, even physically. And yet, at the end of the book Rosen does return, and discovers that Pill Hill is still a neighborhood, just as important to its current residents, just as much home, as it ever was for Rosen and his neighbors. It was not destroyed by the arrival of African-American homeowners and is still a beautiful, well-kept, comfortable haven on the South Side.
The format of "The South Side" is a quasi-play with narrator, which could make it an excellent tool for discussion groups, where individual members could play the "parts" in the play. Although Rosen does not offer answers, he raises a lot of valuable questions and will make you think about the meaning of neighborhood, neighbors and community. Well written, and a fast and easy read.
MOQ
Just finished this book. Terrific. Expertly captures the emotional, political, racial, economic and sociological components of this complicated era.
Rosen is a talented author, as well as a songwriter, lyricist, musician. Check out his musical CDS, especially South Side Story.
Kanal
I decided to chance reading this book although I was not familiar with the author Louis Rosen. I am a college educated Black American professional who has intergrated 2 predominately white/jewish neighborhoods the latter move has amazed my understanding of this "white flight" syndrome. Just as the Galloways represented in this book had no intentions of ever trying to intergrate or assimilate into these neighborhoods, I too just could'nt understand this response by white people and especially jewish people when black americans move into a neighborhood. From my experience Jews refuse to live around anyone other than their own kind and believe me upper middle class blacks have just learned to deal with it. This book was very interesting and

informally an open insight of why people flight. Everything appeared to stem from fear or down right ignorant bigotry. This book was honest and it was well appreciated to know why people feel the way they do. I read this book in 2 days and found it bitter sweet for all the people that felt that they had to run.