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Free eBook Selected Stories of Lu Hsun download

by Lu Hsun

Free eBook Selected Stories of Lu Hsun download ISBN: 091705671X
Author: Lu Hsun
Publisher: Cheng & Tsui Co (June 1, 1978)
Language: English
Pages: 255
Category: Other
Subcategory: Humanities
Size MP3: 1450 mb
Size FLAC: 1687 mb
Rating: 4.2
Format: mbr azw mobi docx


Ding Ling and Lu Hsun, The Power of Weakness. Selected Stories, Lu Hsun (1918–1926) at ww. oldbacon.

Ding Ling and Lu Hsun, The Power of Weakness. The Feminist Press (2007) 84–93. The Lyrical Lu Xun: a Study of his Classical-style Verse-a book by Jon Eugene von Kowallis (Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press, 1996) – includes a complete introduction to Lu Xun's poetry in the classical style, with Chinese characters, literal and verse translations, and a biographical introduction which summarizes his life in relation to his poetry. Works by Xun Lu at Project Gutenberg.

Lu Hsun was born in 1881 and died in 1936. Besides writing fiction, he wrote essays and a classic work on Chinese literature. Ha Jin is the author of Waiting (National Book Award winner), The Bridegroom, and other works. Библиографические данные. Selected Stories of Lu Hsun The Norton Library ; N848 The Norton library (Выпуск 848). Lu Hsun, Xun Lu. Перевод

Home Browse Books Book details, Selected Stories of Lu Hsun.

Home Browse Books Book details, Selected Stories of Lu Hsun. Selected Stories of Lu Hsun. By Hsun Lu. No cover image. A primary source is a work that is being studied, or that provides first-hand or direct evidence on a topic.

Yeh, Y. Lu Hsun's life and his short stories. Preface to the first collection of short stories, Call to arms. We’re dedicated to reader privacy so we never track you.

Lu Hsun (also known as Lu Xun), was the pen name of Zhou Shuren (1881–1936), a leading figure of modern Chinese literature. In the 1930s he became the titular head of the League of Left-Wing Writers in Shanghai. Lu Xun was born into a family of landlords and government officials in Shaoxing, Zhejiang; the family's financial resources declined over the course of his youth

However, Lu Hsun must be looked at within the context of the time period in which he wrote: around 1920, in China. As with all of Lu Hsun's work, he uses the short stories in this collection to criticize the society he lives in. I haven't read all of the short stories.

However, Lu Hsun must be looked at within the context of the time period in which he wrote: around 1920, in China.

Selected Stories of Lu Hsun. Translated by Yang Hsien-yi and Gladys Yang. As early as in the May 1918 issue of the magazine New Youth, Lu Hsun published one of his best stories, A Madman's Diary. This was his "declaration of war" against China's feudal society, and the first short story in the history of modern Chinese literature.

Start reading Selected Stories of Lu Hsun on your Kindle in under a minute. For this reason, I feel the book should have included an introduction to both Lu Xun and the socio-political circumstances that influenced his writing. Specific analyses for each separate story would also have contributed greatly to making this an excellent book. As it is, the book is merely a collection of stories with almost no to put these stories into context. Further, the text is littered with typos.

Lu Hsun (also known as Lu Xun), was the pen name of Zhou Shuren (1881–1936), a. .Books related to Selected Stories of Lu Hsun.

Lu Hsun (also known as Lu Xun), was the pen name of Zhou Shuren (1881–1936), a leading figure of modern Chinese literatu. Lu Xun was born into a family of landlords and government officials in Shaoxing, Zhejiang; the family's financial resources declined over the course of his youth. Lu aspired to take the imperial civil service exam; but, due to his family's relative poverty, was forced to attend government-funded schools teaching "Western education".

Book by Hsun, Lu
User reviews
Oparae
This is not a book for people that don't like to think a lot since it is written with secondary meanings about his life and events in Chinese history from 1900-1935
Lanin
While the stories themselves are worth reading for anyone with an interest in Chinese history, they won't make much sense to anyone with no knowledge of modern Chinese history as the stories all have to be interpreted against the social and political backdrop of the Xinhai Revolution and its aftermath.

For this reason, I feel the book should have included an introduction to both Lu Xun and the socio-political circumstances that influenced his writing. Specific analyses for each separate story would also have contributed greatly to making this an excellent book. As it is, the book is merely a collection of stories with almost no information/analyses to put these stories into context.

Further, the text is littered with typos. Most frequently, the letters "b" and "h" as well as "r" and "t" get mixed up, leading to instances where the text states "cur off his head" instead of "cut off" and "heating" instead of "beating". I personally found this quite annoying and also unacceptable considering the frequency of these typos.

In closing, this edition will only please those who know against which backdrop to interpret the stories. And even for these people, I think there must be a better collection of Lu Xun's stories available that offers more commentary and analysis. Only get this if you will be satisfied with just the stories and nothing more!
Butius
I do not know if this is true for all versions, but the kindle version is 3 pages about erectile disfunction, which is NOT what I paid for.
Exellent
Lu Hsun (1881- 1936) was a national hero of the new China, a cultural revolutionary and the father of modern Chinese literature. Although he never joined the Communist Party, he had the views of a revolutionary democrat and declared war against Chinese feudalism and Confucian values. His writings were introduced to the West in 1960 and this is the 3rd edition, 1972 (255 pages) translated by Yang Hsien-yi and Gladys Yang. The translation is in understated British English. For more earthy American English see the Lyell translation. A master of irony, he described the contemporary conditions of China with critical realism. His three most famous stories are A Madman's Diary, The True Story of Ah Q and The New Year's Sacrifice. The short stories of Lu Hsun are required reading for those studying modern Chinese history. The other stories are:

Preface to the First Collection of Short Stories, Call to Arms.
Kung I-Chi
Medicine
Tomorrow
An Incident
Storm in a Teacup
My Old Home
Village Opera
In the Wine Shop
A Happy Family
Soap
The Misanthrope
Regret for the Past
The Divorce
The Flight to the Moon
Forging the Swords
Jairani
Lu Xun (a.k.a. Lu Hsun) is considered the father of modern literature in China, and his work has had a profound influence on the arts of his native land. For the Western reader, the more you know about Chinese history and culture the more you will understand and enjoy these stories. This is best illustrated by Lu Xun's most famous work, "The True Story of Ah Q". Considered a masterpiece in China, it tells the story of a clueless ne'er-do-well who stumbles his way through the transition from an old imperial regime to a new revolutionary government, suffering a series of humiliations along the way. It's obviously a satirical piece, though Westerners with little knowledge of Chinese history and politics may have trouble figuring out what exactly is being satirized. While some of the broader themes in the story are apparent, for the most part I felt like a Tibetan yak herder trying to make sense of Huckleberry Finn, Don Quixote, or Candide. The same holds true for the last two stories in the book, "The Flight to the Moon" and "Forging the Swords". Both are based on myths or folklore, and in both cases, the metaphor escaped me.

Despite these few moments of culture shock, throughout the remainder of the book Lu Xun's skill as a storyteller is evident, and his keen perception of the human condition imbues these stories with a universal appeal that defies cultural boundaries. Most involve a first-person narrator, an educated city-dweller, presumably Lu Xun himself, who travels back to his home village to visit his family. There he meets an old friend, relative, or acquaintance who reminds him of a lost memory from his past. These are often bleak tales emphasizing the negative aspects of Chinese society in the early 20th century: peasants held down by a restrictive class hierarchy ("My Old Home"), women locked into a system of marital customs little better than slavery ("The New Year's Sacrifice"), intellectuals persecuted for their political leanings ("The Misanthrope"), and the relentless futility of folk medicine and traditional religious practices in solving people's problems ("Medicine" and "Tomorrow").

Though Lu Xun was a radical leftist, his stories do not carry any blatant overtures in favor of communism or any other political creed. They are, however, loaded with blatant condemnation of the old feudalistic order of the Qing Dynasty. When Lu Xun writes about his childhood, he does show some fond nostalgia for the old Chinese customs (most notably in "Village Opera"), but as an adult intellectual he clearly advocates the abandonment of the antiquated social order in favor of more modern, Western-influenced ideas. This collection presents a fascinating view of Chinese culture at a revolutionary turning point. Any lover of literature with an interest in China will appreciate these well-crafted and emotionally moving stories.