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by Lars Laamann,Zhou Xun,Frank Dikötter

Free eBook Narcotic Culture: A History of Drugs in China download ISBN: 0226149056
Author: Lars Laamann,Zhou Xun,Frank Dikötter
Publisher: University of Chicago Press; 1 edition (April 16, 2004)
Language: English
Pages: 256
Category: Other
Subcategory: Humanities
Size MP3: 1474 mb
Size FLAC: 1133 mb
Rating: 4.2
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In a stunning historical reversal, Frank Dikötter, Lars Laamann, and Zhou Xun tell this different story of the .

In a stunning historical reversal, Frank Dikötter, Lars Laamann, and Zhou Xun tell this different story of the relationship between opium and the Chinese. They reveal that opium actually had few harmful effects on either health or longevity; in fact, it was prepared and appreciated in highly complex rituals with inbuilt constraints preventing excessive use. Opium was even used as a medicinal panacea in China before the availability of aspirin and penicillin. Delving into a history of drugs and their abuses, Narcotic Culture is part revisionist history of imperial and twentieth-century Britain and part sobering portrait of the dangers of prohibition.

Frank Dikötter is professor of modern history in China at the University of London's School of Oriental and African .

Frank Dikötter is professor of modern history in China at the University of London's School of Oriental and African Studies. He is the author of several books, most recentlyCrime, Punishment, and the Prison in China. This work traces the history of opium and narcotic use throughout China over the last 200 years, paying particular attention to the so-called remedies for addiction, most of which contained opium, morphine or heroin, that were peddled at the same time.

Narcotic Culture book. To this day, the perception persists that China was a civilization. In an historical reversal, Frank Dikötter, Lars Laamann & Zhou Xun tell this different story of the relationship between opium & the Chinese. They reveal that opium actually had few harmful effects on either health or longevity; in fact, it was prepared & appreciated in highly complex rituals with inbuilt constraints preventing excessive use. Opium was even used as a medicinal panacea in China before the availability of aspirin & penicillin.

Opium and China are synonymous, yet historians have so far failed to answer one key question: why was opium rather than cannabis or coffee so eagerly . Dikötter, Frank and Laamann, Lars and Xun, Zhou, Narcotic Culture. A Social History of Drug Consumption in China ( 2002).

Opium and China are synonymous, yet historians have so far failed to answer one key question: why was opium rather than cannabis or coffee so eagerly consumed? This article is a preliminary exploration of the cultural significance and social uses of narcotics from the sixteenth to the mid-twentieth centuries. British Journal of Criminology, Vol. 42, Issue 2, pp. 317-336, 2002. Frank Dikötter (Contact Author). affiliation not provided to SSRN.

The analyst and the inner city: Race, class and culture through a psychoanalytic lens Hillsdale: The Analytic Press. The singing detective: A place in mind Inuit morality play. The emotional education of a three-year-old.

February 2007 · The Journal of Asian Studies. Narcotic Culture: A History of Drugs in China. By DikötterFrank, LaamannLars, and XunZhou. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2004.

In contrast, this book shows that opium in China served as an essential lubricant in male social activities.

In Narcotic Culture: A History of Drugs in China, Frank Dikötter, Lars Laamann, and Zhou Xun debunk the opium myth through exploration of the history of opium in China from the sixteenth century to the mid-twentieth century. They point out that the opium myth was invented by nationalist reformers and never reflected the reality of opium in Chinese society during the late imperial period. In contrast, this book shows that opium in China served as an essential lubricant in male social activities. Opium was prepared and appreciated in highly sophisticated ceremonies by male social elites. Opium also served as a panacea for many ailments.

3Narcotic Culture provides a critical history of opium, based on a wide range of published and archival sources, and . Electronic reference.

In the first place, this work shows that most of the opium consumed in China in the nineteenth century, initially imported from Bengal but later produced domestically, contained relatively low quantities of morphine. Florence Bretelle-Establet, Frank Dikötter, Lars Laamann, Zhou Xun, Narcotic Culture : A History of Drugs in China , China Perspectives, 62 november - december 2005, Online since 20 December 2006, connection on 03 December 2019.

by Zhou Xun, Lars Peter Laamann, Frank Dikötter. To this day, the perception persists that China was a civilization defeated by imperialist Britain's most desirable trade commodity, opium-a drug that turned the Chinese into cadaverous addicts in the iron grip of dependence. Britain, in an effort to reverse the damage caused by opium addiction, launched its own version of the "war on drugs," which lasted roughly sixty years, from 1880 to World War II and the beginning of Chinese communism.

To this day, the perception persists that China was a civilization defeated by imperialist Britain's most desirable trade commodity, opium—a drug that turned the Chinese into cadaverous addicts in the iron grip of dependence. Britain, in an effort to reverse the damage caused by opium addiction, launched its own version of the "war on drugs," which lasted roughly sixty years, from 1880 to World War II and the beginning of Chinese communism. But, as Narcotic Culture brilliantly shows, the real scandal in Chinese history was not the expansion of the drug trade by Britain in the early nineteenth century, but rather the failure of the British to grasp the consequences of prohibition.In a stunning historical reversal, Frank Dikötter, Lars Laamann, and Zhou Xun tell this different story of the relationship between opium and the Chinese. They reveal that opium actually had few harmful effects on either health or longevity; in fact, it was prepared and appreciated in highly complex rituals with inbuilt constraints preventing excessive use. Opium was even used as a medicinal panacea in China before the availability of aspirin and penicillin. But as a result of the British effort to eradicate opium, the Chinese turned from the relatively benign use of that drug to heroin, morphine, cocaine, and countless other psychoactive substances. Narcotic Culture provides abundant evidence that the transition from a tolerated opium culture to a system of prohibition produced a "cure" that was far worse than the disease.Delving into a history of drugs and their abuses, Narcotic Culture is part revisionist history of imperial and twentieth-century Britain and part sobering portrait of the dangers of prohibition.
User reviews
Rrd
I was required to have this book for an elective I was taking, and upon reading this was astounded at some of the information provided. Very informative book with grave detail.
Helo
Professor Frank Dikötter, presently teaching history at the University of Hong Kong, is one of the new breed of historians who have tackled the myths and legends that have grown up around the opening of China to the West. Previously, historians were content to uncritically accept the view that bad foreigners addicted the Chinese to opium in a series of 19th century wars, thus feeding the present-day Chinese sense of grievance toward Westerners. What Dikötter has carefully shown, working almost exclusively from impeccable primary sources, is that the truth is much more complex. At the same time, for example, that China's Dao-Guang emperor was complaining of the horrible effects connected with the importation of opium into his country, the British were calmly and quietly using opium legally in larger quantities per capita than the Chinese.

This work traces the history of opium and narcotic use throughout China over the last 200 years, paying particular attention to the so-called remedies for addiction, most of which contained opium, morphine or heroin, that were peddled at the same time. No intelligent researcher can do without this work on his bookshelf as a permanent reference.
Vobei
ridiculous and shameless idea from white race aspect of view.
Drelalen
Dikkoter's claims are absurd. Imperialism always has its apologists. This is just the 'white mans' burden' in a new guise.
Dikkoter is eager to point out Mao's faults whilst eulogizing destructive Western imperialism. Hong Kong has long suffered from British brainwashing. Hong Kong people barely know their own history. That Dikkoter is able to hold down a job in one of Hong Kong's universities is an example of how thoroughly pro-Western biased scholarship has permeated Hong Kong's education system.

Dikkoter's 'brilliance' lies in the speciousness of his arguments. The Chinese had opium long before the British introduced as a means of emptying China's coffers.

Far from exposing propaganda, Dikotter is an exponent of it.