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Free eBook The Savage Detectives (Library Edition) download

by Roberto Bolano,Eddie Lopez,Armando Duran

Free eBook The Savage Detectives (Library Edition) download ISBN: 1433292629
Author: Roberto Bolano,Eddie Lopez,Armando Duran
Publisher: Blackstone Audio, Inc.; Unabridged edition (August 1, 2009)
Language: English
Category: Other
Subcategory: Humanities
Size MP3: 1191 mb
Size FLAC: 1422 mb
Rating: 4.3
Format: docx txt lrf lit


The Savage Detectives is an ark bearing all the strange salvage of poetry and youth from catastrophes past and those . The Savage Detectives is deeply satisfying.

The Savage Detectives is an ark bearing all the strange salvage of poetry and youth from catastrophes past and those yet to come. -Nicole Krauss, author of The History of Love. Bolaño's book throws down a great, clunking, formal gauntlet to his readers' conventional expectations. -Thomas McGonigle, Los Angeles Times. One of the most respected and influential writers of generation.

Roberto Bolaño (Author), Eddie Lopez (Narrator), Armando Durán (Narrator), Inc . The Savage Detectives is my second Bolaño. Blackstone Audio (Publisher) & 1 more. libraries, dissing the poetry establishment, partaking in a bohemian approach to sex and relationships, and a good amount of drugs and drinking.

The savage detectives. by. Bolaño, Roberto, 1953-2003; Wimmer, Natasha. New York : Farrar, Straus and Giroux. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; ctlibrary; china; americana.

The Savage Detectives book. A polymathic descendant of Borges and Pynchon, Roberto Bolaño traces the hidden connection between literature and violence in a world where national boundaries are fluid and death lurks in the shadow of the avant-garde. The Savage Detectives is a dazzling original, the first great Latin American novel of the twenty-first century.

The late Chilean writer Roberto Bolaño has been called the García Márquez of his generation. In this dazzling novel, the book that established his international reputation, Bolaño tells the story of two modern-day Quixotes-the last survivors of an underground literary movement, perhaps of literature itself-on a tragicomic quest through a darkening, entropic universe. The Savage Detectives, which, like 2666, has been translated with wonderful agility by Natasha Wimmer, catapulted from obscurity to worshipful adulation. Janet Maslin, New York Times. Attn: Author/Narrator If you have any queries please contact me at info19782 @ gmail.

Читать онлайн The Savage Detectives. The Savage Detectives.

Roberto Bolaño The Savage Detectives Translated From The Spanish By Natasha Wimmer For Carolina López and Lautaro Bolaño, who have the good fortune to look alike. Читать онлайн The Savage Detectives. Translated From The Spanish By Natasha Wimmer. For Carolina López and Lautaro Bolaño, who have the good fortune to look alike. Do you want Mexico to be saved?

The Savage Detectives (Los Detectives Salvajes in Spanish) is a novel by the Chilean author Roberto Bolaño published in 1998. Natasha Wimmer's English translation was published by Farrar, Straus and Giroux in 2007.

The Savage Detectives (Los Detectives Salvajes in Spanish) is a novel by the Chilean author Roberto Bolaño published in 1998.

Читает Eddie Lopez и Armando Duran. The late Chilean writer Roberto Bolano has been called the Garcia Marquez of his generation

Читает Eddie Lopez и Armando Duran. Мгновенный доступ к вашим любимым книгам без обязательной ежемесячной платы. Слушайте книги через Интернет и в офлайн-режиме на устройствах Android, iOS, Chromecast, а также с помощью Google Ассистента. The late Chilean writer Roberto Bolano has been called the Garcia Marquez of his generation. In this dazzling novel, the book that established his international reputation, Bolano tells the story of two modern-day Quixotes-the last survivors of an underground literary movement, perhaps of literature itself-on a tragicomic quest through a darkening, entropic universe.

Narrated by Eddie Lopez. The late Chilean writer Roberto Bolaño has been called the García Márquez of his generation. In this dazzling novel, the book t.

Written by Roberto Bolaño, Audiobook narrated by Eddie Lopez, Armando Durán. Getting into the chaotic rhythm of The Savage Detectives may take some time to adjust to for some listeners. But once you're tuned in, you'll experience one of the most thrilling, satisfying literary rides of your life.

One of the New York Times and Washington Post s Ten Best Books of 2007 The late Chilean writer Roberto Bolaño has been called the García Márquez of his generation. In this dazzling novel, the book that established his international reputation, Bolaño tells the story of two modern-day Quixotes the last survivors of an underground literary movement, perhaps of literature itself on a tragicomic quest through a darkening, entropic universe. Brilliantly rendered into English by Natasha Wimmer, the acclaimed translator of Bolaño s other great masterwork, 2666, The Savage Detectives is an exuberant, wildly inventive, and ambitious novel from one of the greatest Latin American authors of our age.
User reviews
Nawenadet
I really did enjoy this novel immensely, but there were a few aspects that often left me confused or just plain bothered.
Several times, they list writers of their time. Since a few obscure real-life writers' names show up, I assume all these are real. If I were more familiar with these writers, I would probably get the satire, but I am not so I didn't get it.
On the other hand, the story is fascinating! And though I was disappointed when the narrator disappeared, I did find it fun to follow these characters all over the world. And you won't understand the title at all until then end. And even then, not completely.
Bolaño is a genious. Or he was. It's tragic that he died so young, just when he was picking up speed. So many stories we will miss out on.
Landaron
Loved the opening section. As for second section, am stuck on about page 400 and can't decide whether to finish or not. The second section has some very ugly, unexplained parts (like when the author's alter-ego is trying to strangle someone on a beach) and some parts that just seem to have been written and included compulsively and drag out the text unnecessarily. It also has a hilarious scene in a publisher's office very reminiscent of Bulgakov, can't decide whether this was intentional nor not.

Any writer who wants instruction in how to orient the reader to time and place should take this book as the only lesson they will need. Also, in a novel about poets, not one line of poetry from the main characters...fantastic device. No, this is not a character-driven book: it is about the life and death of a way of life and way of seeing the world, of a time and place that the author misses very much. If you view Visceral Realism in Mexico City in the late 1970's as a character in its own right, you will be just as saddened to see it unraveling, along with its leaders, as you would with any other literary character.

This edition is worth reading for the author's comments in interviews on Latin American literature alone....never liked Vargas Llosa or Isabel Allende, or Laura Esquivel, and I now feel freed.
Vinainl
Every so often you come upon a book that you can only diminish the more you try to explain what it's about. "The Savage Detectives" is such a book. Ostensibly it's about a couple of wild young poets who revive an old literary movement and go in search of its forebears. Ultimately they grow older, become increasingly disillusioned, never attain their once-lofty aspirations, heading straight for neglect and oblivion...and yet through everything they still hold on to a belief--a faith, if you will--in poetry and revolution.

Okay, that's, in a nutshell, what the novel is "about."

But the experience of reading "The Savage Detectives" is one that cannot be described in words other than those Bolano himself used to create this passionate and poetic adventure of heart, mind, and soul. This is a book that follows two characters--through the eyes of a dozen or so other characters--who take literature seriously, as a matter of life and death, not as a mere pastime, not as simple entertainment. If you don't share something of the same conviction, you're likely not to get the point of this novel; actually, you're likely to conclude that there isn't any point to it at all.

This is a novel that cannot be contained, nor can it contain itself. If it's difficult to say precisely what it's about, that's in good part because it's about everything--about life and death, about love and art, about beauty and squalor, corruption and violence, humanity and inhumanity. "The Savage Detectives" has the tone and authority of a summing up of all that Bolano had seen and thought in his abbreviated life--a message he was desperate to get down, if not in the most symmetrical of forms, than in a far more honest, if messy, explosion of urgency.

This novel throbs with life and intensity--it manages to be both unbearably sad and irresistibly inspiring. Bolano writes as if he's running only a step or two in front of the burning fuse, which, as it turns out, he was. In the end, though, we all share the same fate. And it seems a good part of Bolano's intent to get us to realize, viscerally, as his fictional "visceral realist" poets do, that time is short and the world is big. Let's live while we can.

It's tempting to call "The Savage Detectives" the best book I've read all year, but such an assertion would no doubt be suspect because of the fact that it's the most recent book I've read. It is, however, at the very least, among the best books I've read in this or any year.

Take the negative reviews of "The Savage Detectives" under advisement. So many of them complain precisely about those things that make this novel so unique and so powerful. Like his even more ambitious "2666," "The Savage Detectives" simply isn't everyone's favorite slice of pie. There are people, after all, who hate coconut custard. Go figure.