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by Roxanne Panchasi

Free eBook Future Tense: The Culture of Anticipation in France between the Wars download ISBN: 0801446708
Author: Roxanne Panchasi
Publisher: Cornell University Press; 1 edition (May 28, 2009)
Language: English
Pages: 240
Category: Other
Subcategory: Humanities
Size MP3: 1745 mb
Size FLAC: 1236 mb
Rating: 4.1
Format: lit azw rtf txt


Books for People with Print Disabilities. Cornell University Press.

In Future Tense, Roxanne Panchasi illuminates both the anxieties and the hopes of a period when many French people-traumatized by what their country had already suffered-seemed determined to anticipate and shape the future.

In the years between the world wars, French intellectuals, politicians, and military leaders came to see certain encounters-between human and machine, organic and artificial, national and international culture-as premonitions of a future that was alternately unsettling and utopian. Skyscrapers, airplanes, and gas masks were seen as traces in the present of a future world, its technologies, and its possible transformations.

Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 2009. Defenestration as Ritual Punishment: Windows, Power, and Political Culture in Early Modern Europe. An Identity of Opinion: Historians and July 1914. Williamson Jr. et al.

Panchasi, Roxanne (2009). Future Tense: The Culture of Anticipation in France Between the Wars. p. 10. ISBN 9780801446702. The Institute of Australian Culture. Retrieved 1 April 2019.

Future Tense: The Culture of Anticipation in France between the Wars. The Banquet Years: The Origins of the Avant-Garde in France, 1885 to World War I. CDN$ 3. 3(21 used & new offers). In Montmartre: Picasso, Matisse and the Birth of Modernist Art. Apr 19 2016. Jun 12 1968. Eligible for FREE Shipping.

Panchasi 2009, p. 5. Panchasi, Roxanne (2009). 59. ^ Oulebsir 2004, p. 351. ^ Spickard 2005, p. 18.

the culture of anticipation in France between the wars. Published 2009 by Cornell University Press in Ithaca, . Intellectual life, Social life and customs, History.

July 2011 · European History Quarterly.

In the years between the world wars, French intellectuals, politicians, and military leaders came to see certain encounters-between human and machine, organic and artificial, national and international culture-as premonitions of a future that was alternately unsettling and utopian. Skyscrapers, airplanes, and gas masks were seen as traces in the present of a future world, its technologies, and its possible transformations. In Future Tense, Roxanne Panchasi illuminates both the anxieties and the hopes of a period when many French people-traumatized by what their country had already suffered-seemed determined to anticipate and shape the future.

Future Tense, which features many compelling illustrations, depicts experts proposing the prosthetic enhancement of the nation's bodies and homes; architects discussing whether skyscrapers should be banned from Paris; military strategists creating a massive fortification network, the Maginot Line; and French delegates to the League of Nations declaring their opposition to the artificial international language Esperanto.

Drawing on a wide range of sources, Panchasi explores representations of the body, the city, and territorial security, as well as changing understandings of a French civilization many believed to be threatened by Americanization. Panchasi makes clear that memories of the past-and even nostalgia for what might be lost in the future-were crucial features of the culture of anticipation that emerged in the interwar period.