» » Iran and the Rise of the Reza Shah: From Qajar Collapse to Pahlavi Power

Free eBook Iran and the Rise of the Reza Shah: From Qajar Collapse to Pahlavi Power download

by Cyrus Ghani

Free eBook Iran and the Rise of the Reza Shah: From Qajar Collapse to Pahlavi Power download ISBN: 1860646298
Author: Cyrus Ghani
Publisher: I.B.Tauris (January 6, 2001)
Language: English
Pages: 304
Category: Other
Subcategory: Humanities
Size MP3: 1397 mb
Size FLAC: 1301 mb
Rating: 4.2
Format: docx mobi azw txt


This book was about what Iran was like at the dawn of the twentieth century to about 1941. The book ends with the begining of the Pahlavi dynasty and only offers an epilogue on the achievements and failings of Reza Shah as king

This book was about what Iran was like at the dawn of the twentieth century to about 1941. The rest of the book is split into three parts. The first is about the Constitutional movement in Iran and its effects on Iranian society. The book ends with the begining of the Pahlavi dynasty and only offers an epilogue on the achievements and failings of Reza Shah as king. It will leave you salivating for more on what happens in the next phase of history.

Iran and the Rise of Reza Shah: From Qajar Collapse to Pahlavi Rule, St. .Dr. Ghasem Ghani (father). Martin's Press (New York, NY), 1999.

by Cyrus Ghani London: . Ghani, a legal consultant and a bibliophile (he makes the astonishing assertion that "Almost all the books I have relied on were in my own library"), is a first-class historian who in a clear manner explains the intricate process by which the British in 1921 almost accidentally pulled off a coup. d'état that set in process the steps that led to dynastic change and the bumpy ride that would be the Pahlavi period.

The 20th century has been cataclysmic for Iran.

Iran and the rise of Reza Shah: from Qajar collapse to Pahlavi rule. The 20th century has been cataclysmic for Iran. This book, written by a scholar well versed in modern Iranian history, covers the period 1919-26. Ghani describes in great detail the historical events.

Pahlavi was born on 15 May 1923 in Iran. He was the fifth child and third son of Reza Shah, the founder of the Iranian Pahlavi dynasty. Iran and the Rise of the Reza Shah: From Qajar Collapse to Pahlavi Power. His mother, Turan (Qamar al Molouk) Amir Soleimani, was related to the Qajar dynasty deposed in 1925 in favor of Reza Shah. More specifically, she was the daughter of a. Qajar dignitary, Issa Majd al Saltaneh. She was also the granddaughter of Majd ed-Dowleh Qajar-Qovanlu Amirsoleimani, Naser al Din Shah's maternal cousin  .

Cyrus Ghani, an Americanophile Iranian lawyer and renowned collector of books, manuscripts and prints on Iran and the region has been an indirect of the Iranian Revolution. He was fortunate to have left Iran with his library intact and with the financial resources to retire like Montaigne to his tower, with the time to contemplate and write. Iran and the Rise of Reza Shah is an impressive work. It is the result of Ghani's unrivaled knowledge of primary sources in Persian and English, as well as his familiarity with German, French and Russian material.

Home . Details for: Iran and the rise of Reza Shah . Material type: BookPublisher: London ; New York : . 24 c. SBN: 1860646298 (pb. Details for: Iran and the rise of Reza Shah : Normal view MARC view ISBD view. Iran and the rise of Reza Shah : from Qajar collapse to Pahlavi rule, Cyrus Ghani. Subject(s): Reza Shah Pahlavi, 1878-1944 Iran - Politics and government - 1911-1925DDC classification: 95. 52092 Online resources: Contributor biographical information Publisher description Table of contents Catalogued By: Mahitab. Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title.

Ghani's published works include Iran and the West: A Critical Bibliography (1987),. Iran and the Rise of Reza Shah: From Qajar Collapse to Pahlavi Power. Middle Eastern Studies. of the memoirs of his father, Ghasem Ghani, and Shakespeare, Persia, and the East (2008).

Online version: Ghanī, Sīrūs. Iran and the rise of Reza Shah. London ; New York : . Tauris, 1998 (OCoLC)607140859 Online version: Ghanī, Sīrūs. Tauris, 1998 (OCoLC)607853939. Named Person: Reza Shah Pahlavi, Shah of Iran; Reza Shah Pahlavi, Shah of Iran. Introduction: Iran Under Qajar Rule - The 1919 Agreement - Declining Prospects of the Agreement - The Resignation of Vosouq al Dowleh - The Premiership of Moshir al Dowleh (Hassan Pirnia) - Sepahdar as Prime Minister - Prelude to the Coup - Reza Khan and the Coup d'Etat of February 1921 - Seyyed.

Reza Shah : From Qajar Collapse to Pahlavi Power by a British general, which brought to power the Reza Shah Pahlavi who ended 130 years o.

Iran and the Rise of the Reza Shah : From Qajar Collapse to Pahlavi Power. This book looks at one of the most important and engrossing chapters in 20th century Iranian history. The post-World War I period began with a triumvirate of Iranian political grandees, encouraged by the British government, attempting to shoe-horn Iran into the British Empire. This was followed by a bizarre coup d' tat, engineered by a British general, which brought to power the Reza Shah Pahlavi who ended 130 years of Qajar rule.

This book looks at one of the most important and engrossing chapters in 20th century Iranian history. The post-World War I period began with a triumvirate of Iranian political grandees, encouraged by the British government, attempting to shoe-horn Iran into the British Empire. This was followed by a bizarre coup d'état, engineered by a British general, which brought to power the Reza Shah Pahlavi who ended 130 years of Qajar rule.
User reviews
Fararala
This book was about what Iran was like at the dawn of the twentieth century to about 1941. The beginning of the book introduces what happened to Iran under the Qajars in order to give the reader a clearer understanding of why Iran was in the shape that it was prior to Reza Shah. The rest of the book is split into three parts. The first is about the Constitutional movement in Iran and its effects on Iranian society. The second describes the political scene from 1909 through World War I and the years after. The third part explains where Reza Shah came from, the 1921 coup d'etat, Reza Shah's role in politics and as Minster of War, and finally Reza Shah's rule as King and his contributions to Iran. The way the author, Cyrus Ghani, wrote the book made me feel like I was actually in Iran when all the historic events were happening. He gave a clear picture of how the two imperial powers in the region, Great Britain and Russia, had a huge influence over the politics of the country and why a man like Reza Shah came into power. Most of the Iranian people at the time were sick and tired of the foreign powers and the Iranian politicians because the powers were sucking Iran dry of its resources while the politicians were trying to fill their pockets and did not care what happened to the country. Reza Shah, on the other hand, was an ardent nationalist who had a deep mistrust for foreign powers and never relied too much on one single country. However, Cyrus Ghani also pointed out that Reza Shah had his flaws too. He stated that Reza Shah tried to enlarge his own estates to great proportions and that he sometimes was not the greatest public speaker. Yet his contributions to Iran were more than enough to compensate for his minor imperfections. He increased the literacy of the country, provided public schooling and transportation, created a unified army, and secularized many parts of the government that were once in the hands of the clergy. Many people accuse Reza Shah of being a tool of the foreign powers and of being a blood thirsty dictator comparable to Stalin or Hitler. The former is very untrue because at that time the Soviets had invaded part of Iran and the British were scared of becoming entangled in a conflict with them, causing them to leave in a hurry to protect their other interests. Having become head of the Cossack force in Iran, a military group created by Czarist Russia as a personal bodygaurd force for the Qajar kings with Russian officers and Iranian soldiers, with all the Russian officers gone and infuriated with the corruption of the government in Tehran, Reza Khan, as he was known before he became king, marched too Tehran with his men and arrested members of the cabinet with no help or instruction from the Soviets or British. The second accusation is just as bogus because he cared for his country and countrymen and improved Iran very quickly in the short time he had as a monarch. Reza Shah also did not use Concentration Camps and murder millions for his political ambitions. The author went to great lengths to provide many sources, not only British archives as some of the other reviews said, for each chapter as well as to create a realistic atmosphere of the time. All in all a very detailed book that deserves more credit than it has received. Another book that I would recommend for people who want to know more about both Pahlavi Shahs is, "Iran under the Pahlavis" by George Lenczowski. Although it does not go as in depth as this book, it describes a lot of different subjects during the rule of Reza Shah and Mohammad Reza Shah.
Rko
I read this book in both English and Farsi just to compare and also to refresh my mind with all the detail it provided. Call it strange, but I did not find a dull sentence in this book, nor did I think the material was just a cut and paste collage. C. Ghani has systematically presented material that needs time to be absorbed by our current knowledge of this issue. I think the book is excellent. Perhaps all the controversy would be eliminated if the book's title would have been, "Iran and the Rise of Reza Shah Based on The Archives of Imperialist England," or something like that.
I would suggest this book to anyone who has an interest in Reza Khan. I would hope that a similar book would be written based on the archives of Russia or Belgium as various readers have suggested, but that does not mean this book is not a grand contribution. I would like very much to read Eric Laurey's "Belge En Perzie." Maybe instead of criticzing Mr. Ghani, he should translate his work into English so that more people could read it. I for one would be very interested in reading the Belgian point of view.
As I browsed through the comments posted on this page, I kept wondering what all the controversy was about surrounding this book. From my point of view, all the criticism this book has received so far rests on very false foundations. I am very disappointed to see that in this stage of human history, people still molest a scholar calling his work `oriental history writing.' I'm so pleased to see that I am not the only person to be taken aback by this extremist remark. Maybe it is time that we too asked people to address our scholars with respect. Isn't it funny how every time an Iranian writes a book, someone from England employs this phrase to discount their effort (A similar comment is on Farmanfarmaian's book, Blood and Oil)? Why is that?
Dordred
This book is a must have for people interested in modern Iranian history.

As many reviewers fail to note, this book is an account of the RISE of Reza Shah and not a biography.

It offers a thoroughly researched account of the crucial period leading up to the fall of the corrupt Qajar dynasty, a period for which no books of this quality exist.

The book ends with the begining of the Pahlavi dynasty and only offers an epilogue on the achievements and failings of Reza Shah as king. It will leave you salivating for more on what happens in the next phase of history.

The tone and style of the book is academic and may turn some readers off, but the content will give readers a new perspective on where Iran came from why it is where it is today.
Frey
It is not true that "no attempt has yet been made to piece together a narrative based on documents rather than hearsay" with regard to the period and the themes discussed in Ghani's book. At the risk of being narcissic I reccomend Ghani my own work "Belgen in Perzië" (available at Library of Congress) wich surprisingly is not mentioned in his bibliography. Belgian officials who worked in Iran from 1895 to 1934 (customs, finance, postal services etc.) and Belgian diplomats produced quite a few documents which provide an independent onlooker's analysis of what went on in Iran. Given the importance of the Belgian assistance in Iran, which was more successfull and lasted longer than Millspaugh's or Armitage Smith's, these documents are invaluable in studying this period of Iranian history. I do not believe it is permissible to leave the Belgian component almost unmentioned. Scores of policies, recommendations and cases of political and social assistance have been provided by Belgians to both the Qadjars and Reza Shah. Modernisation of the state was not made possible by the ephemeral Millspaugh tax-reform but rather by the long term and unrelenting Belgian efforts to render the customs system efficient. At one point these customs offices were the ONLY source of income for the Shah.