» » Love in Excess (Broadview Literary Text)

Free eBook Love in Excess (Broadview Literary Text) download

by Eliza Haywood,David Oakleaf

Free eBook Love in Excess (Broadview Literary Text) download ISBN: 1551113678
Author: Eliza Haywood,David Oakleaf
Publisher: Broadview Press; 2 edition (June 12, 2000)
Language: English
Pages: 296
Category: Other
Subcategory: Humanities
Size MP3: 1761 mb
Size FLAC: 1497 mb
Rating: 4.8
Format: rtf mobi lrf lit


Eliza Haywood burst upon the London literary scene with LOVE IN EXCESS in 1719, the same year Defoe published ROBINSON CRUSOE. Both novels created a sensation.

Eliza Haywood burst upon the London literary scene with LOVE IN EXCESS in 1719, the same year Defoe published ROBINSON CRUSOE. Reading these books in succession is fascinating, because Haywood does a complete turnaround between 1719 and 1753. Her hot-blooded lovers give way to calm and utterly rational lovers. Haywood wrote for a living and had to update her product to satisfy the changing literary marketplace. LOVE IN EXCESS is a must-read for fans of Eliza Haywood.

Love in Excess: Or, The Fatal Enquiry (Broadview Literary Texts). Eliza Haywood, David Oakleaf. Download (epub, 537 Kb). FB2 PDF MOBI TXT RTF. Converted file can differ from the original. If possible, download the file in its original format.

Items related to Love in Excess (Broadview Literary Text). David Oakleaf teaches in the Department of English at the University of Calgary. He specializes in fiction, from Eliza Haywood and Jonathan Swift to Laurence Sterne and Frances Burney

Items related to Love in Excess (Broadview Literary Text). Eliza Haywood Love in Excess (Broadview Literary Text). ISBN 13: 9781551113678. Love in Excess (Broadview Literary Text). He specializes in fiction, from Eliza Haywood and Jonathan Swift to Laurence Sterne and Frances Burney. Paula Backscheider, Auburn University.

Finding books BookSee BookSee - Download books for free. Love in Excess: Or, The Fatal Enquiry (Broadview Literary Texts). 537 Kb. The history of Miss Betsy Thoughtless. Eliza Fowler Haywood, Christine Blough.

Broadview Literary Texts. Love in Excess is a well crafted novel in which the claims of love and ambition are pursued through multiple storylines until the heroine engineers a melodramatic conclusion. Haywood's frankness about female sexuality may explain the later neglect of Love in Excess. Love in Excess and its reception provide a lively and valuable record of the challenge that female desire posed to social decorum.

Love in Excess (1719–1720) is Eliza Haywood's best known novel. It details the amorous escapades of Count D'Elmont, a rake who becomes reformed over the course of the novel. Love in Excess was a huge bestseller in its time, going through multiple reissues in the four years following its initial publication. It was once compared in terms of book sales with Gulliver's Travels and Robinson Crusoe.

Author: Eliza Haywood David Oakleaf.

Find nearly any book by Eliza Haywood. Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 booksellers. Selected Fiction and Drama of Eliza Haywood (Women Writers in English 1350-1850). ISBN 9780195108477 (978-0-19-510847-7) Softcover, Oxford University Press, 1999.

Series Title: Broadview Literary Texts. Publisher: Broadview Press Inc. Author: Eliza Haywood. Street Date: February 26, 1999. The fresh appearance of Haywood's 'Pre Adamitical History' is sure to generate renewed interest in this remarkable and daring work. - Margaret Anne Doody, Vanderbilt University.

Eliza Haywood's book was one of the most popular novels in its day, competing with Defoe's Robinson Crusoe

This book taught me that chapters are awesome and that I take modern text formatting way too for granted. Eliza Haywood's book was one of the most popular novels in its day, competing with Defoe's Robinson Crusoe. It tells the story of Count D'Elmont and his quest for romantic and fulfilling love.

Eliza Haywood (1693-1756) was one of the most successful writers of her time; indeed, the two most popular English novels in the early eighteenth-century were Robinson Crusoe and Haywood’s first novel, Love in Excess. As this edition enables modern readers to discover, its enormous success is easy to understand. Love in Excess is a well crafted novel in which the claims of love and ambition are pursued through multiple storylines until the heroine engineers a melodramatic conclusion.

Haywood’s frankness about female sexuality may explain the later neglect of Love in Excess. (In contrast, her accomplished domestic novel, The History of Miss Betsy Thoughtless, has remained available.) Love in Excess and its reception provide a lively and valuable record of the challenge that female desire posed to social decorum.

For the second Broadview edition, the appendix of eighteenth-century responses to Haywood has been considerably expanded.

User reviews
Steel balls
Number 17 of 1001 Books you must read before you die. Eliza Haywood's book was one of the most popular novels in its day, competing with Defoe's Robinson Crusoe. It tells the story of Count D'Elmont and his quest for romantic and fulfilling love. On his way he ravishes one woman, whom he mistakenly thinks is writing him love letters, marries the woman who was writing him the letters, but whom one he doesn't love, and falls in love with his ward. He attempts to seduce the ward and ends up causing jealousy in his wife who dies as a result of a bed room mix up. He rejects others, one because she is too forceful and obvious in her passion for him and he finds it a turn off, and another who while loving him discreetly from afar is no competition for his ward. Eventually through a series of adventures he is reunited with his true love. While Eliza Haywood was a successful writer in her time she was also frowned upon for writing of the true nature of women's feelings and desires, which then were supposed to be suppressed and only expressed when a man expressed his first. In this book it is only the women who follow this rule that are successful in love, so while considered risqué at the time the book really could be seen as a manual for proper feminine etiquette in the 18th century. I disliked how D'Elmont as the hero was able to get away with his poor treatment of his first love and his wife and even his unsuccessful and downright devious attempts at seduction of his ward and still come out a triumphant in his love.
Cemav
an early example of a romance novel with the women being taken advantage of and men not being shown in a good light
Uthergo
A great book from 18th entry literature.
Tyler Is Not Here
I enjoyed this early work of 'amatory' fiction. It has all the elements of a present day soap opera. A fun read that has much to say about relationships as perceived in the eighteenth century.
MEGA FREEDY
Its an ok novel. Wasn't really my taste, but a good read.
Nalmezar
This has possibly been the single most unreadable thing I have ever had the extreme displeasure of reading. Weather or not you like/love this book is completely irrelevant. This version is not even worth lighting on fire to keep yourself alive.
The type is completely illegible, words are horribly, horribly misspelled, and there are things such as: "......;:!?vvvvvvvvvva gh". What the hell does that say? Is that even legible words? How can you charge money for this?
If I could rate this 0 stars I would. Jeez, I think they should have to pay ME to take this book from them. Not that I would take it, they would need to give me a LOT more than $30 for this hunk of illegible crap.
Utchanat
This book was an utter waste of time. Not only is it the most awful piece of literature I have read, the story is completely redundant in each of the books contained in the novel. Pope and others were on to something when they criticized her writing. Haywood should have stuck to short stories.
So laments out one of Eliza's Haywood's love-crazed heroines in LOVE IN EXCESS.

Don't read this book unless you can enter fully into the amatory spirit of the early eighteenth century! You'll be expected to shudder at the power of passion, tremble when a man tempts a virtuous woman - and sympathize with fainting fits, jealous ravings and the short fuses of duel-happy cavaliers.

Eliza Haywood burst upon the London literary scene with LOVE IN EXCESS in 1719, the same year Defoe published ROBINSON CRUSOE. Both novels created a sensation.

Haywood's plot centers around Count D'elmont, a young war hero whose great charm and personal beauty cause one woman after another to pursue him. He himself is immune to sentiment and marries purely for money. Too late, he encounters a young woman who makes him burn with love.

Various other ladies and gentlemen in the Count's circle fall prey to love and furnish the reader with heart-pounding adventures. Shocking things happen, including murders, suicides, abductions and betrayals of trust.

Haywood maintains that her characters can't be blamed for their excesses. Love is a misfortune like poverty or sickness and "absolutely controls the will."

I was inspired to re-read Haywood's first novel after finishing her last novel, THE HISTORY OF JEMMY AND JENNY JESSAMY. Reading these books in succession is fascinating, because Haywood does a complete turnaround between 1719 and 1753. Her hot-blooded lovers give way to calm and utterly rational lovers. Haywood wrote for a living and had to update her product to satisfy the changing literary marketplace.

LOVE IN EXCESS is a must-read for fans of Eliza Haywood. Others, of course, might find it excessive.

I definitely recommend the Broadview edition. I loved the lively introduction, with its infectious enthusiasm and deep scholarship.