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Free eBook All-Weather Fighters: The Second Team of the United States Air Force for Much of the Cold War download

by Gordon Greer

Free eBook All-Weather Fighters: The Second Team of the United States Air Force for Much of the Cold War download ISBN: 0595678246
Author: Gordon Greer
Publisher: iUniverse, Inc. (September 11, 2006)
Language: English
Pages: 156
Category: Other
Subcategory: Humanities
Size MP3: 1790 mb
Size FLAC: 1804 mb
Rating: 4.4
Format: txt lit rtf mbr


Greer outlines the not well-known aircraft and activities of the United States Air Force's all-weather fighters during the first part of the Cold War. He covers the organization, development and decline of the all-weather force in response to the Soviet Union's long-range strategic bomber force. Mr. Greer outlines the not well-known aircraft and activities of the United States Air Force's all-weather fighters during the first part of the Cold War. He covers the organization, development and decline of the all-weather force in response to the Soviet Union's long-range strategic bomber force equipped with atomic weapons.

All-Weather Fighters book. Greer outlines the not well-known aircraft and activities of the. The author describes not only the individual aircraft from the early night fighters of World War II through the F-106A of the seventies and beyond but also the control organization that directed them until the whole operation was made superfluous by the ballistic missile standoff between the United States and the Soviet Union in the latter half of the Cold Wa. .

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Mr He covers the organization, development and decline of the all-weather force in response to the Soviet Union's long-range strategic bomber.

Greer outlines the not well-known aircraft and activities of the United States Air Force's all-wea. With the purchase of Kobo VIP Membership, you're getting 10% off and 2x Kobo Super Points on eligible items. Your Shopping Cart is empty. There are currently no items in your Shopping Cart.

The United States Air Force became a separate military service on 18 September 1947 with the implementation of the National Security Act of 1947. The Act created the National Military Establishment, later renamed the United States Department of Defense, which was composed of four of the five branches, the Army, Marine Corps, Navy, and a newly created Air Force.

The US Air Force is the youngest of the military branches, and much like . The Air Force is seen by most as the preferred branch of service, though its seeming 'easiness' can be highly misleading to many recruits.

The US Air Force is the youngest of the military branches, and much like the youngest sibling of any family, it's typically the most spoiled. The massive air battles and bombing campaigns of World War II however saw that attitude quickly change, and nations around the world began building dedicated air forces as separate branches of their militaries.

The work of the 1370th bridged a crucial gap in the history of military technology. You might as well have been on the moon for most of it, Barnes says

The work of the 1370th bridged a crucial gap in the history of military technology. By the late 1950s, both the United States and the Soviet Union had developed intercontinental ballistic missiles, but satellite navigation systems like GPS weren’t yet up and running. That left military planners with a huge challenge: how to program a missile to hit a target on the other side of the world. Even a tiny mistake could be disastrous. The maps of the time weren’t up to the task. You might as well have been on the moon for most of it, Barnes says. Once Barnes came up with a plan, he’d hand it off to one of the ground-station squadrons and one of the flying squadrons of the 1370th.

In the wake of the September 11 attacks, American citizens within the United States constantly worry about security against future terrorist attacks

In the wake of the September 11 attacks, American citizens within the United States constantly worry about security against future terrorist attacks. But author Gordon Greer delves further into this subject by trying to understand why the general public is so intent on the ramifications of security measures, such as the Patriot Act. The history of warfare might provide an answer. Greer examines domestic security throughout the history of the United States.

Badges of the United States Air Force. Most Air Force badges are awarded in three degrees or skill levels.

Mr. Greer outlines the not well-known aircraft and activities of the United States Air Force's all-weather fighters during the first part of the Cold War. He covers the organization, development and decline of the all-weather force in response to the Soviet Union's long-range strategic bomber force equipped with atomic weapons. The author describes not only the individual aircraft from the early night fighters of World War II through the F-106A of the seventies and beyond but also the control organization that directed them until the whole operation was made superfluous by the ballistic missile standoff between the United States and the Soviet Union in the latter half of the Cold War.
User reviews
Inabel
I was in the all-weather fighter business in the USAF so I enjoyed the nostalgia of reading it. It describes very accurately and in good detail the
activities of an AWI unit. Good pictures.
Yozshujinn
Was well written and factual, but is more for a novice that was not there.
Ginaun
It is so sad that nothing much has ever been said about our Radar Observers and the time spent training and flying the Lockheed 94-C and sitting alerts all nite long and being scrambled in all kinds of weather to go up and identfiy those aircraft that might be attacking the eastern coast of the US. We did a good job too---we were never attacked. I was in the 53-7 class of ROs at Connally and unfortunately have not seen or heard a word of any of my classmates--or can I find any info anywhere about the squadrons or bases where we were assigned.--------SAD

Bob Benson RO Class 53-7 James Connally AFB 1952-1953
HappyLove
this book needed some professional editing.
The author provides interesting information about early U.S. Air Force interceptors of the Cold War era, but the book is rife with clumsy phrasing, unsupported assertions and redundant paragraphs. Most irritating is the repeated listing of mutually contradictory specifications of the same aircraft from conflicting sources with no attempt to reconcile them.

Greer attempts to group Cold War interceptors into 'generations' based on their electronics/radar/fire control suites, lumping various marques of the F-86D, F-89 and F-94 with each other rather than by common airframe. It's an interesting idea, but would require a lot more supporting information to make it a valid thesis. The author's narrative lingers on these early subsonic interceptors, then devotes just a few scant pages to the supersonic generation (F-101B, F-102, F-106) that served far longer and were much more successful.

A handful of anecdotes and an interesting idea don't compensate for the book's compositional/editing flaws.