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Free eBook Ontological Relativity Other Essays download

by W. V. Quine

Free eBook Ontological Relativity  Other Essays download ISBN: 0231083572
Author: W. V. Quine
Publisher: Columbia University Press (November 22, 1969)
Language: English
Pages: 165
Category: Other
Subcategory: Humanities
Size MP3: 1931 mb
Size FLAC: 1957 mb
Rating: 4.2
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Departn1ent of Philosophy and five additional essays. The remaining four essays in the book are of recent vintage.

Departn1ent of Philosophy and five additional essays. W. V. Quine is Edgar Pierce Professor of Philosophy at Harvard University. The title essay of this book was presented as a pair of lectures of the same title at Columbia. University, March 26 and 28, 1968. They constituted the first. They were already at press before this book was thought of, and they still are. Some of them will doubtless appear, in.

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Quine, W. Ontological Relativity and Other Essays. Series:The John Dewey Essays in Philosophy. Columbia university press. Prices do not include postage and handling if applicable. Please find details to our shipping fees here. RRP: Recommended Retail Price.

Willard Van Orman Quine (1908-2000) was an American philosopher and logician who taught at Harvard University, and wrote many books such as Word and Object,The Web of Belief,From a Logical Point of View,Pursuit of Truth,Theories and Things,Methods of Logic,Philosophy of Logic,Quiddities: An Intermittently Philosophical Dictionary, etc.

Similar books and articles. Ontological Relativity. Quine - 1968 - Journal of Philosophy 65 (7):185-212. Quine - 1969 - In Ontological Relativity and Other Essays. New York: Columbia University Press. Vaughn R. McKim - 1971 - New Scholasticism 45 (2):368-369. Epistemology Naturalized. Willard van Orman Quine - 1969 - Columbia University Press. Willard V. Quine - 1969 - In Jaegwon Kim & Ernest Sosa (ed., Ontological Relativity and Other Essays.

Ontological Relativity & Other Essays.

This book can be found in: Spirituality & Beliefs Philosophy History of Western philosophy Western philosophy: 1900 onwards Spirituality & Beliefs Philosophy Metaphysics & ontology. Ontological Relativity and Other Essays (Paperback). Quine (author).

Other books in this series. Michael J. Green is the Japan Chair and senior adviser at the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS) and an associate professor of international relations at Georgetown University. He has served as special assistant to the president for national security affairs and senior director for Asian affairs at the National Security Council. His publications include Japan's Reluctant Realism and Arming Japan.

However, I didn’t see how this explained away ontology or refuted other epistemological theories.

1969 Ontological Relativity and Other Essays.

This volume consists of the first of the John Dewey Lectures delivered under the auspices of Columbia University's Philosophy Department as well as other essays by the author. Intended to clarify the meaning of the philosophical doctrines propounded by W. V. Quine in Word and Objects, the essays included herein are intimately related and concern themselves with three philosophical preoccupations: the nature of meaning, the meaning of existence and the nature of natural knowledge.

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iSlate
They don't make books like this any more. Seriously though, this compilation of lecture essays by the late philosopher W.V.O. Quine is brilliant and succinct placing the meta-parameters of the logic of language and ideas expressed with language into a context illuminating for philosophical effort in fields as diverse as the philosophy of language, philosophy of logic, epistemology, social philosophy and even metaphysics.
Rainbearer
W.V.O. Quine is one of the most influential philosophers of our modern times. The tide of philosophical history was ever changed by Quine's philosophies, particularly with the philosophies that he espoused after the fall of Logical Positivism.
"Ontological Relativity & Other Essays" is a collection that recapitulates the major philosophical themes that have come to be known as Quinean philosophy. From the two dogmas of empiricism, ontological relativity, radical translation, holism, and indeterminacy of translation, all of these issues are themes in this collection of essays. These essays discuss some of the core ideals of Quine, ideals that are central to understanding Quinean philosophy.
რฉςh
Willard Van Orman Quine (1908-2000) was an American philosopher and logician who taught at Harvard University, and wrote many books such as Word and Object,The Web of Belief,From a Logical Point of View,Pursuit of Truth,Theories and Things,Methods of Logic,Philosophy of Logic,Quiddities: An Intermittently Philosophical Dictionary, etc.

He wrote in the Preface to this 1969 book, “The title essay of this book was presented as a pair of lectures of the same title at Columbia University, March 26 and 28, 1968. They constituted the first of the John Dewey Lectures… To help orient the reader, the title essay is preceded in the volume by ‘Speaking of Objects.’ This was my presidential address to the eastern division of the American Philosophical Association in 1957… The remaining four essays in the book are of recent vintage. They were already at press before this book was thought of and they still are.”

He notes in the first essay, “There is indeed an archaic precedent for confusing sign and object; the earliest conditioning of the infant’s babbling is ambiguous on this point. For suppose a baby rewarded for happening to babble something like ‘mama’ or ‘water’ just as the mother or water is looming. The stimuli which are thus reinforced are bound to be two: there is not only the looming of the object, there is equally the word itself, heard by the child from his own lips. Confusion of sign and object is original sin, coeval with the word.” (Pg. 15)

He begins the title essay, “Philosophically I am bound to Dewey by the naturalism that dominated his last three decades. With Dewey I hold that knowledge, mind, and meaning are part of the same world that they have to do with, and that they are to be studied in the same empirical spirit that animates natural science. There is no place for a prior philosophy.” (Pg. 26)

He points out, “So, though [Bertrand] Russell was wrong in suggesting that numbers need more than their arithmetical properties, he was right in objecting to the definition of numbers as any things fulfilling arithmetic. The subtle point is that any progression will serve as a version of number so long and only so long as we stick to one and the same progression. Arithmetic is, in this sense, all there is to number: there is no saying absolutely what the numbers are, there is only arithmetic.” (Pg. 45)

He continues in the same essay, “How then can there be no sense in saying what the objects of a theory are? My answer is simply that we cannot require theories to be fully interpreted, except in a relative sense, if anything is to count as a theory. In specifying a theory we must indeed fully specify, in our own words, what sentences are to comprise the theory, and what things are to be taken as values of the variables, and what things are to be taken as satisfying the predicate letters, insofar we do fully interpret the theory, RELATIVE to our own words and relative to our overall home theory which lies behind them. But this fixes the objects of the described theory only relative to those of the home theory, and these can, at will, be questioned in turn.” (Pg. 51)

He adds, “Ontological relativity is not to be clarified by any distinction between kinds of universal predication---unfactual and factual, external and internal. It is not a question of universal predication. When questions regarding the ontology of the theory are meaningless absolutely, and become meaningful relative to a background theory, this is not in general because the background theory has a wider universe.” (Pg. 53)

He says about Hume, “he did succeed in construing some singular statements about bodies as indubitable truths… But general statements, also singular statements about the future, gained no increment of certainty by being construed as about impressions. On the doctrinal side, I do not see that we are farther along today than where Hume left us. The Humean predicament is the human predicament.” (Pg. 72)

He asserts, “Induction itself is essentially only more of the same: animal expectation or habit formation. And the ostensive learning of words is an implicit case of induction. Implicitly the learner of ‘yellow’ is working inductively toward a general law of English verbal behavior, though a law that he will never try to state; he is working up to where he can in general judge when an English speaker would assent to ‘yellow’ and when not. Not only is ostensive learning a case of induction, it is a curiously comfortable case of induction, a game of chance with loaded dice.” (Pg. 125)

These essays are a highly interesting collection , that will be of great interest to anyone studying Quine, or modern logical philosophy.
Rarranere
A wonderful book, although I believe the title of the book (at least that of its main essay) does not accurately describe the content of Quine's argument. Without providing any basis for such a step, Quine equates ontology with a study of the implications of the meta-language. True, language is a crucial part of how we form our conception of the world, but to assume that there is nothing (or very little) else to the foundational possibility of such a conception is to be too dismissive of what Fichte argued, with a set of very strong arguments, to be the main problem of philosophy: does the human mind's propensity to ascribe objective existence to the putative referents of its own ideas (and words) represent an illusion or a truthful induction?
Kit
The essay "Ontological Relativity" is the most significant of the six essays in this short book bearing the same title. Few ideas are as central to the contemporary pragmatist philosophy of science. Basically the outcome of the thesis of ontological relativity together with Quine's rejection of all prior metaphysics is that scientific criticism may never use any prior ontological criteria relative to empirical testing. This has special significance in social and behavioral science, where positivists such as behaviorists emphatically exclude all mentalistic ontologies, while romanticists such as sociologists and neoclassical economists just as emphatically require them. Unfortunately Quine is not altogether faithful to his ontological relativity thesis, since he is a behaviorist. Perhaps had he been less faithful to the notational conventions of the Russellian predicate calculus, he would not have required quantification of predicates to admit the reality of mental experiences, and thus would not have been reduced to referring to them as "mental entities", as thought they are little marbles inside the skull. One hesitates to say that when Quine decided to reject mentalism a priori, he lost his marbles. In fact ontological relativity does not imply behaviorism, but actually proscribes it as a prior criterion for empirical research, while permitting it a posteriori. Like the physicist's p-branes of string theory, mental constructs, such as cognitive psychologists postulate with their computer systems, are posits to be patronized on the basis of their promissory or redeemed cash value in the empirical test. The history of scientific progress fully vindicates ontological relativity. And the behavioral and social scientists' failure to recognize it goes far toward explaining the retarded condition of their sciences. Visit my web site philsci.

Thomas J. Hickey