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Free eBook War at the Top of the World: The Struggle for Afghanistan, Kashmir and Tibet download

by Eric Margolis

Free eBook War at the Top of the World: The Struggle for Afghanistan, Kashmir and Tibet download ISBN: 0415930626
Author: Eric Margolis
Publisher: Routledge; 1 edition (March 8, 2001)
Language: English
Pages: 272
Category: Other
Subcategory: Humanities
Size MP3: 1752 mb
Size FLAC: 1834 mb
Rating: 4.5
Format: doc txt docx lit


Margolis covers the Russian invasion of Afghanistan, the Indo-Pakistani war in Kashmir, and current and projected tensions between India and China in detail, as well as the origins of Osama bin Laden, the Taliban, a brief explanation of the tribal set up of the middle east, the aftermath of colonial powers, and war at 18,000 feet on the Siachen Glacier, and.

Margolis, Eric S. Publication date. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by sf-loadersive. org on October 7, 2010. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata). Terms of Service (last updated 12/31/2014).

Margolis’ book brings the story of Afghanistan up-to-date to the rise of the . Margolis’ book provides an overview of the potential flash points in the icy, high altitudes of the world.

Margolis’ book brings the story of Afghanistan up-to-date to the rise of the Taliban. He also deals with Osama bin Laden and his activities up to the attacks on US Embassies in Eastern Africa. The book is discusses Kashmir and it’s potential to spark a nuclear war between Pakistan and India. He covers the rise of the BJP in India and how this is just the latest manifestation of Indian nationalism. Lastly he deals with the PRC and the problems found in both Tibet and Sinkiang. Oct 13, 2015 Andy Selters rated it really liked it.

What does the future hold for Afghanistan? How will the war there affect the already unstable politics of Central Asia? In War at the Top of the World, veteran foreign correspondent Eric Margolis presents a revelatory history o. .

What does the future hold for Afghanistan? How will the war there affect the already unstable politics of Central Asia? In War at the Top of the World, veteran foreign correspondent Eric Margolis presents a revelatory history of the complicated and volatile conflicts that have entangled Afghanistan, Pakistan, the United States, the Soviet Union, and many others. War at the Top of the World: The Struggle for Afghanistan, Kashmir and Tibet. Shop for Books on Google Play. Browse the world's largest eBookstore and start reading today on the web, tablet, phone, or ereader. Go to Google Play Now .

Home Browse Books Book details, War at the Top of the World . A new Great Game is afoot at the top of the world

Home Browse Books Book details, War at the Top of the World: The Struggle for. A new Great Game is afoot at the top of the world. the chain of mountain ranges, plateaus, and valleys that begins in Afghanistan and Kashmir, and then sweeps 2,500 miles (4,000 km) across the Indian subcontinent to Burma (now Myanmar), is fast becoming one of the globe's most volatile and dangerous geopolitical fault zones. In May 1998, India shocked the world by detonating five nuclear devices, and testing intermediate-range missiles in an unmistakable assertion of its new, self-proclaimed status as a superpower.

War at the top of the world: The struggle for Afghanistan, Kashmir and Tibet. Caught napping: Images of surveillance, discipline and punishment on the body of the schoolchild. Looking at discipline, looking at labour: photographic representations of Indian boarding schools. Visual Studies 19 (1), 72-96, 2004. How Mentoring Functions in the Hidden Curriculum. E Margolis, M Romero. History of Education 36 (2), 191-211, 2007.

Bashiri I. Eric Margolis's War at the Top of the World: The Struggle for Afghanistan, Kashmir, and Tibet. Journal of Asian Studies. In: Journal of Asian Studies. 2002 ; Vol. 61. pp. 721-722. cle{919093a26078, title "Eric Margolis's War at the Top of the World: The Struggle for Afghanistan, Kashmir, and Tibet", author "Iraj Bashiri", year "2002"

The Struggle for Afghanistan, Kashmir, and Tibet Award winning author, columnist, and broadcaster Eric S. Margolis has covered 14 wars and is a leading authority on military affairs, the Middle East, South Asia, and Islamic movement. ndia and Pakistan are at the brink of .

The Struggle for Afghanistan, Kashmir, and Tibet Award winning author, columnist, and broadcaster Eric S. ndia and Pakistan are at the brink of a conventional or even nuclear war over long-disputed Kashmir that could kill tens of millions and pollute the entire globe. South Asia is fast becoming the world’s latest zone of crisis

War at the Top of the World

War at the Top of the World. In this stunning read, veteran foreign correspondent Eric Margolis presents a revelatory history of the complicated and volatile conflicts that entangle one of the most beautiful and remote parts of the world. PART ONE The Great Jihad.

Eric S. Margolis is an award-winning, internationally syndicated columnist

Eric S. Margolis is an award-winning, internationally syndicated columnist. His articles appear in the New York Times, the International Herald Tribune, the Los Angeles Times, Times of London, the Gulf Times, the Khaleej Times and Dawn. He is a regular contributor to The Huffington Post. Margolis is the author of War at the Top of the World: The Struggle for Afghanistan, Kashmir and Tibet and American Raj: Liberation or Domination?: Resolving the Conflict Between the West and the Muslim World.

In this stunning read, veteran foreign correspondent Eric Margolis presents a revelatory history of the complicated and volatile conflicts that entangle one of the most beautiful and remote parts of the world.
User reviews
Aurizar
Eric Margolis's "War at the top of the World" provides, as "The Economist" described it an "gripping and instructive" account of the issues and background to the contemporary conflict between India and Pakistan over Kashmir, that majority muslim state in a majority Hindu country. But it does much more too. Published in 2000 before smoke from 9-11 effectively blocked, at least in the popular media in the US and much of the west, any kind of wider analysis of modern geopolitics in the Himalaya - South/West Asia region, it provides observers of the region ...and of America's involvement in Afghanistan... with much of the background and wider context needed to unravel the otherwise seemingly bizarre politics of the region. It's a roadmap to the realities of the region that is easy to follow and hard to put down.

It is an excellent, indeed superior, journalistic account that integrates historical and geopolitical analysis, with a sufficient levening of first person travel writing to turn non-fiction into a page turner. Margolis makes the great spine of the Himalayas come alive. As someone who has spent time in the region and in Ladakh ("Little Tibet") Margolis's work added extra depth to my traveller's experience.

The recent assassination of Benazir Bhutto has boosted the relevance of Margolis's book even further. Pakistan, he reminds us, owes it's name to an anagram of Punjab, Afghanistan, Kashmir and Sind, yet only two of those four provinces are currently under Pakistani rule. The founders had bigger ideas. It also derives it's name from the word "Paak", meaning "pure". Pakistan's founders imagined it as a "land of the pure", a kind of muslim Israel. Maybe even a muslim "Eretz Israel". And like Israel, Pakistan has had a continuing struggle between those with secular versus theocratic visions for the country. Overlayng this spiritual struggle is the more down to earth conflict between the forces of "feudalistic democracy" as represented by the Bhutto's, who 'own' their populist political party in much the same way as the family owns vast landed estates, versus the Army, which like the military in Indonesia and Burma, is really a self governing corporate state within the state, a military economic complex that may direct as much as 25% of Pakistan's economy. Margolis's approach to geopolitics rightfully considers it as best seen as a branch of geography.

Pakistan's populous hug the valleys of the Indus in much the same way as Egypt's hug the Nile. Away from this long lifeline, terrain not humanity dominates. This makes Pakistan a strategically vulnerable state, prone to Indian dissection, as much from geography as history. In order to protect their rear, Pakistan perceives a need to dominate Afghanistan and has done so for decades through tribal proxies of various descriptions. Hollywood likes to portray the Afghan Soviet War as "Charlie Wilson's war", a CIA directed campaign against Soviet invaders. A kind of Bay of Pigs that actually worked. A more accurate label would have been "General Zia's war", as it was the Afghan military dictator, who overthrew corrupt civilian predecessors, who saw the need and opportunity to defeat the Soviets with Afghan tribal proxies and who wrangled US, British and Chinese underwriting of a campaign directed and supplied by Pakistani military intelligence, the ISI. More recently the so called "Taliban", actually the militant arm of the Pashtun tribes, who constitute some 55% of the population of Afghanistan have become ISI's favoured proxies.

Pakistani vulnerability, like that of Israel, also drove their quest for nuclear weapons. Nuclear weapons have both strategic and tactical relevance to the Pakistanis. Besides the high profile sabre rattling with nuclear India, they are seen as a possible answer to the Indian Army's armour superiority, especially in the relatively open and "tank friendly" desert country of the south east. Margolis doesn't mention it but there are echoes here of NATO's cold war adoption of nuclear first strike posture as a counter to the Soviet's superiority in conventional armoured forces. Unlike American demands for Pakistan to help 'catch' Osama Bin Laden, these geo-strategic concerns actually have "life or death" relevance to Islamabad. Margolis shows how the nuclear tango between Pakistan and India is really a three way dance. In all probability India may have commenced it's drive for the bomb before China, even if Peking beat them to the first test. Margolis notes how India commenced it's nuclear program following their humiliation to superior Chinese infantry and logistics following Himalayan border conflicts of the early sixties. A doubly humiliating event as Nehru, a patron of "Third World" anti-imperialism and a die hard fabian socialist found himself pleading for support from the US Navy. India's bomb, of course, realised under the reign of Indira Gandhi was meant to perform multiple duty, as a badge of status, a deterrent to China and a bludgeon against Pakistan. In response Pakistani premier Bhutto, Benazir's father, ultimately executed by Zia, commenced the quest for an Islamic bomb and said his people would "eat grass" if needed to pay for it.

Margolis describes the history, geography and geopolitics of the "Little Tibets", Ladakh, Sikkim and Bhuttan as well as "Big Tibet" too. He shows China's drive to dominate the Tibetan plateau, a drive that has now given them the high ground over the Indian subcontinent and an integrated surveillance, military, logistics and transport network in the region that India would be pushing up hill, literally, to match.

As mentioned earlier, this is not just a perceptive analysis of diplomatic and defence matters, but a personal story. Margolis describes the key places, towns, peoples and individuals he met during many journeys into the Himalayas, Kashmir and Tibet. It includes first person descriptions of meetings with the Dalai Lama and jeep rides with Pakistani colonels. Margolis has the knack of description. I would not have considered Deng Xiaoping, 20th century Asia's greatest revolutionary before reading Margolis, but my guess is that when legacies are finally audited a century from now, Deng will certainly eclipse Mao. Although the final chapter on possible futures scenarios for China is highly speculative, most of his book is solidly grounded in the forces shaping today's headlines.

Highly recommended.
Qumenalu
War at the Top of the World: The Struggle for Afghanistan, Kashmir, and Tibet, revised and updated, 2002, by Eric S. Margolis Pp. XIII+311

Intended as a revelatory history, War at the Top of the World is an accounting of the authors journeys through Pakistan and Afghanistan, with brief forays into Kashmir, India, Iran, Iraq, China, and Russia. Margolis covers the Russian invasion of Afghanistan, the Indo-Pakistani war in Kashmir, and current and projected tensions between India and China in detail, as well as the origins of Osama bin Laden, the Taliban, a brief explanation of the tribal set up of the middle east, the aftermath of colonial powers, and war at 18,000 feet on the Siachen Glacier, and finally the current (at the time of publication, 2001) conflict between the USA and Taliban.

The goal of this book is not to answer a specific question or re-explain how or why certain events happened as is the case with most history books. Rather, the author creates a basic primer in the geopolitics and history of the region sometimes referred to as the Middle East, east. Stretching from Iran in the west, south to India, east to China, and north through Russia, this region encompasses much of the western European countries as well as the far and middle east. The region is wrought with strife due to its inherently inhospitable nature, wars that have stretched on for nearly 150 years between various combatants, many of whom are not located anywhere near the region, the tribal nature of the inhabitants, and the abrupt withdrawal of colonial governments. Some questions that are brought up throughout the book have to deal with the financing of various groups in the region, political intrigues between the great powers, and where the next war in the region will erupt, as well as what the future (and inevitable, Margolis assures us) nuclear confrontation between China and India will look like.
War at the Top of the World does a fantastic job of explaining the rise to power of various governments in the Middle East, bluntly stating which intelligence agencies assassinated which leaders or installed which regimes. In the first section of the book, Margolis explains why Russia was originally forced out of Afghanistan, as well as why they were there in the first place. In the final pages he speaks of how the War on Terror has led to the very situation America tried so hard to prevent throughout the latter half of the 20th century, the Russian occupation of the region. Margolis also frankly explains the betrayal of Tibet by what seems to be every great power in the world, the circumstances and motivations behind several seemingly pointless and unwinnable wars between India and Pakistan, why the mujahedeen enjoy such overwhelming support throughout the Middle East, and why conflict in the region is unlikely to stop anytime soon.
Consisting mainly of accounts of the authors travels with groups of mujahedeen and the Pakistani military, interspersed with unfounded opinion and wild claims, and unburdened by sources, this book reads more like a set of 22 essays, loosely tied together by a common narrative viewpoint and regional association, rather than the presentation of evidence based theory I was expecting.
While it is a fascinating and easy read, it would probably be last on my list of books to read before writing a research paper on the area. Besides his utter lack of evidence and occasionally wild opinions, Margolis is unashamedly pro-Muslim and Pakistan, providing for a refreshingly different presentation of events in Afghanistan than the post 9-11-2001 literature on the area more common in Western academia today. While he does attempt to give a fair (and openly biased) account of what he believes happened, he tends to treat the words of Pakistani officials as fact, even when the evidence to support such is nonexistent. Unfortunately, his pro-Muslim bias also carries over into his description of India, and a few chapters leave a hint of racism in their wake.
Overall, War at the Top of the World is a wonderful read, and providing you already have a thorough grounding in the history and geopolitics of the region enabling you to decant the facts from the opinions of the author, a decent book on the Middle East East, worth adding to your collection.
Rainpick
I am amazed at the on-line reviews posted here that severely criticize this book. I could not disagree more. Margolis writes superbly, brings first-hand experience to his theories, and illuminates a chilling reality that is virtually unknown to 99% of the American public. As an author he is entitled to express his opinions, and I found them refreshingly direct as well as fair. I certainly never learned the information presented in this book from any American media source, while the positions of India, China, and the former Soviet Union have been given ample ink over the years. I recommend this book to any thinking person who unwittingly believes they are well informed on current global conflicts; I daresay they will be as deeply affected as I was. The issues presented by Margolis cannot easily be dismissed or ignored, and most of the reviewers here seem to be missing that point.