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Free eBook The Ethics of Killing: Problems at the Margins of Life (Oxford Ethics Series) download

by Jeff McMahan

Free eBook The Ethics of Killing: Problems at the Margins of Life (Oxford Ethics Series) download ISBN: 0195169824
Author: Jeff McMahan
Publisher: Oxford University Press; 1 edition (August 28, 2003)
Language: English
Pages: 560
Category: Other
Subcategory: Humanities
Size MP3: 1759 mb
Size FLAC: 1941 mb
Rating: 4.5
Format: mobi lit doc lrf


The ethics of killing : problems at the margins of life, by Jeff McMahan. p. c. (Oxford ethics series) Includes bibliographical references and index. ISBN 0-19-507998-1 1. Murder-Moral and ethical aspects.

The ethics of killing : problems at the margins of life, by Jeff McMahan. 2. Abortion-Moral and ethical aspects. 3. Aged, Killing of the-Moral and ethical aspects. 4. Insane, Killing of the-Moral and ethical aspects. 5. Euthanasia-Moral and ethical aspects. M35 2001 17. -dc21 2001021768. 135798642 Printed in the United States of America.

The Ethics of Killing is a terrific book that addresses fundamental issues in a detailed, sophisticated wa.

The Ethics of Killing is a terrific book that addresses fundamental issues in a detailed, sophisticated way. It is full of new ideas and insights. However, even for someone that disagrees with some of Jeff McMahan's positions, the Ethics of Killing is well written, and helps the reader, both professionals as well as students, gain a deeper, physical and metaphysical conception of what is wrong with killing. The writing style uses many examples that appeal to intuition, both positively and negatively, and appeals to which are used by McMahan to make sensible arguments.

This magisterial work is the first comprehensive study of the ethics of killing, where the moral status of the .

This magisterial work is the first comprehensive study of the ethics of killing, where the moral status of the individual killed is uncertain. Drawing on philosophical notions of personal identity and the immorality of killing, McMahan looks carefully at a host of practical issues, including abortion, infanticide, the killing of animals, assisted suicide, and euthanasia.

Spoiler: The Ethics of Killing does find some abortion to be acceptable

Spoiler: The Ethics of Killing does find some abortion to be acceptable. This is probably the basis of most mainstream(. simple) criticism of this work.

McMahan’s The Ethics of Killing. This book is a most impressive, rigorously argued. For decisions at the end of life, we need to recognise two concepts of death; death as the irreversible loss of consciousness, which can occur even if the organism. remains alive and death of the organism. for analysis of questions regarding the morality of killing. A large part of its appeal. must surely derive from the author’s competence with questions of metaphysics and. his ability to apply his theoretical conclusions on personal identity, the wrongness of. killing, etc. to practical questions of ethics. The first chapter sets the foundation for the discussions of practical problems.

The Ethics of Killing book. That brings us to killing at the margins of life: abortion and euthanasia. There is a lot discussed the abortion section. This magisterial work is the first comprehensive study of the. Death is bad because it thwarts the future interests of a person in realizing future good. Note that it is their interest that matters.

A comprehensive study of the ethics of killing in cases in which the metaphysical or moral status of the . What primarily matters is how killing would affect that which would be rational for the victim to care about at the time of death.

A comprehensive study of the ethics of killing in cases in which the metaphysical or moral status of the individual killed is uncertain or controversial. Among those beings whose status is questionable or marginal in this way are human embryos and fetuses, newborn infants, animals, anencephalic infants, human beings with severe congenital and cognitive impairments, and human beings who have become severely demented or irreversibly comatose.

The Ethics of Killing: Problems at the Margins of Life (Oxford University Press, 2002). Doing Good & Doing the Best, in Paul Woodruff, e. Philanthropy and Philosophy: Putting Theory Into Practice (New York: Oxford University Press). Killing In War (Oxford University Press, 2009). The Ethics of Killing: Self-Defense, War, and Punishment (forthcoming, Oxford University Press, 2019). Rosenbaum, Martin (12 November 2018). Pseudonyms to protect authors of controversial articles".

6 McMahan and DeGrazia believe that if the harm of death were due to just the extent and value of the future that one would miss out on, then the death of the embryo would typically be worse for it than the death of the newborn is for the latter, while the newborn would be more harmed by death than an older child. Killing And Letting Die Is it worse.

Problems at the Margins of Life. Oxford Ethics Series. Problems at the Margins of Life. This book sets out from central issues in moral theory and brings us in the end to some of the hardest moral problems of modern life. This magisterial work is the first comprehensive study of the ethics of killing, where the moral status of the individual killed is uncertain. At the beginning of the new century, it will form the cornerstone of the moral philosophy of killing. -John Broome, Oxford University.

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User reviews
Dilkree
The book is good, I bought it for a philosophy class. I must have a different definition of “very good” condition when it comes to buying used products. There is writing and irrelevant rainbow tabs all throughout this book. It’s difficult not to stop (as a philosopher) to not stop and ponder why they outlined that they did. There are only a handful of pages with no writing throughout all 500 pages. Whoever had this book before clearly should’ve just kept it to themself.
Purestone
This is simply the best and most comprehensive book on the topic of killing within applied ethics. The work is well written and covers a tremendous amount of ground on the different arguments related to the ethics of killing both historically and in the contemporary literature. Philosophical issues associated with abortion, euthanasia, theories of death, the soul, harm, are all covered. McMahan gives clear expositions of arguments that have been so far advocated from all sides of the issue in philosophy and medical ethics on when and why killing is wrong and proceeds to offer his own analysis and conclusions. Even if you do not agree with McMahan on his conclusions, you will likely find where the contemporary and historical philosophical setting takes place.

I especially thought impressive McMahan's breadth of knowledge in relevant philosophical and medical topics associated with the main topics such as personal identity, the philosophy of mind, human biological development, moral responsibility, the physiology of death and many other relevant topics. For example, before we know if a killing of a person is wrong, we need to know what a person is to analyse when killings of persons occur. This topic is an issue for personal identity. What are persons? Are they biological organisms? Their brains? Some immaterial soul substance? The book explores in detail all such related topics in depth.

Another cool aspect of this book is that just about all the chapters can be read independently of each other. They all deal with separate topics and McMahan's argumentation do not presuppose knowledge of arguments or information given in previous chapters.

The book's subtitle, "Problems at the Margins of Life" hints that the book covers the ethical issues of these kinds of killing: abortion, of animals, and euthanasia. The book is meant to be the first of a series on killing, later books will cover the ethics of killing in war and in self-defense.
Thoginn
Spoiler: The Ethics of Killing does find some abortion to be acceptable. This is probably the basis of most mainstream(i.e. simple) criticism of this work.

However, even for someone that disagrees with some of Jeff McMahan's positions, the Ethics of Killing is well written, and helps the reader, both professionals as well as students, gain a deeper, physical and metaphysical conception of what is wrong with killing. The writing style uses many examples that appeal to intuition, both positively and negatively, and appeals to which are used by McMahan to make sensible arguments.

This work, intended as the first part of a two part series on Killing, attempts to find exactly what is morally wrong with killing. One answer that is dealt with is what exactly is morally wrong with ending a life. McMahan attempts to resolve such fundamental questions by starting with a notable focus on identity. In identifying what is essentially 'us' as embodied minds, and not something simply biological, McMahan opens new considerations by which to explore the ethical issues in killing. Ultimately, McMahan succeeds in providing a well written examination, that, while can be questioned, must be taken seriously.
IWAS
I purchased this book for an independent study this summer, and it blew me away. By far, McMahan has the most fair and reasonable approach regarding this topic relative to similar authors.
Malann
This book delves deeply into issues of the highest importance, and it does so in an engaging, lucid, and accessible way. Both the philosopher and the intelligent layperson should gain a lot.

Fyi, towards the beginning there is a fair amount about the metaphysics of personal identity, but that material is both fascinating in itself and crucial to much of the ethics that follows.
Redfury
Prof. Jeff McMahan is a sine qua non of applied ethics -- which is further established by this rigorous, incisive book. Couched firmly in the analytic traditional, he meticulously teases apart issues in applied philosophy relating to death, while connecting them to undergirding normative and metaphysical theory.

He also writes clearly, resorting to jargon as little as possible. As a result, the book is accessible to many, in spite of the sophistication of its arguments, which makes it ideal at the graduate-level. As a grad student in Philosophy, I highly recommend "The Ethics of Killing".

The only negative aspect is that, because the book combined breadth with depth, there were parts where it seemed as if he had to pull back. (I have in mind parts having to do with personal identity -- which is a topic clearly worthy of multiple volumes itself). But I guess this is to be expected of a book this ambitious.
Vobei
This book is worth to buy. There are many good arguments inside and provides a good resource for philosophical research. Although it is not easy to read, it is truely helpful to clarify the problems of killing, letting die, the nature of a person, personal identity and moral concerns on embryos. This is really a good book in moral philosophy and metaphysics.