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Free eBook The Birth of the Palestinian Refugee Problem, 1947-1949 (Cambridge Middle East Library) download

by Benny Morris

Free eBook The Birth of the Palestinian Refugee Problem, 1947-1949 (Cambridge Middle East Library) download ISBN: 0521330289
Author: Benny Morris
Publisher: Cambridge University Press; 1 edition (March 25, 1988)
Language: English
Pages: 400
Category: Other
Subcategory: Humanities
Size MP3: 1603 mb
Size FLAC: 1272 mb
Rating: 4.1
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This latest addition to the Cambridge Middle East Library is a book of exceptional importance.

This latest addition to the Cambridge Middle East Library is a book of exceptional importance. It will be required reading for anyone who professes a serious interest in the Arab-Israeli conflict over Palestine. Firstly, Yigael Alon and Israel Galili, in The Book of the Palmah, gave Walid Khalidi material to argue in 1959 that the Dalet Plan was "the master plan of the Zionists" to expel Palestinians wholesale. Furthermore, Uri Millstein's 1973 History of the Hagana included the entire Dalet Plan text.

Refugees, Palestinian Arab, Palestinian Arabs, Israel-Arab War, 1948-1949, Jewish-Arab relations. Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china.

The birth of the Palestinian refugee problem is traced from the 1947-9 exodus and the first Arab-Israeli war through Israel's decision to bar refugee repatriation and the subsequent fate of the abandoned Arab territories. Published February 24th 1989 by Cambridge University Press (first published January 1st 1988). Benny Morris is professor of history in the Middle East Studies department of Ben-Gurion University of the Negev in the city of Be'er Sheva, Israel. He is a key member of the group of Israeli historians known as the "New Historians". Books by Benny Morris.

Cambridge Middle East library. Palestinian refugee problem, 1947-1949. xx, 380 p. : Number of pages.

Solving the refugee problem December 1948 September 1949. Benny Morris is Professor of History in the Middle East Studies Department, Ben-Gurion University

While the focus remains the 1948 war and the analysis of the Palestinian exodus, the new material contains more information about what happened in Jerusalem, Jaffa and Haifa, and how events there led to the collapse of Palestinian urban society. Solving the refugee problem December 1948 September 1949. Benny Morris is Professor of History in the Middle East Studies Department, Ben-Gurion University.

This book is the first full-length study of the birth of the Palestinian refugee problem. Based on recently declassified Israeli, British and American state and party political papers and on hitherto untapped private papers, it traces the stages of the 1947-9 exodus against the backdrop of the first Arab-Israeli war and analyses the varied causes of the flight.

Morris, Benny ‘Operation Dani and the Palestinian Exodus from Lydda and Ramle in 1948’, The Middle East Journal, 40. .

Morris, Benny ‘Operation Dani and the Palestinian Exodus from Lydda and Ramle in 1948’, The Middle East Journal, 401, Winter 1986. Nazzal, Nafez, The Palestinian Exodus from Galilee, 1948, Beirut, The Institute for Palestine Studies, 1978. Stein, Kenneth, ‘One Hundred Years of Social Change, the Creation of the Palestinian Refugee Problem’, in Laurence Silberstein, e. New Perspectives on Israeli History, the Early Years, New York, New York University Press, 1991. Teveth, Shabtai, Ben-Gurion and the Palestinian Arabs, Oxford, Oxford University Press, 1985.

Mobile version (beta). The Birth of the Palestinian Refugee Problem Revisited (Cambridge Middle East Studies). Download (pdf, . 3 Mb) Donate Read. Epub FB2 mobi txt RTF. Converted file can differ from the original. If possible, download the file in its original format.

The Birth of the Palestinian Refugee Problem Revisited. Cambridge Middle East Studies. 18. Cambridge University Press. Howe, Irving; Gershman, Carl (1972). Israel, the Arabs and the Middle East. p. 168. ^ Pappé, Ilan (October 2006). Abu-Sitta, Salman (7 August 2001). The Unfolding of the Holocaust".

This book is the first full-length study of the birth of the Palestinian refugee problem. Based on recently declassified Israeli, British and American state and party political papers and on hitherto untapped private papers, it traces the stages of the 1947-9 exodus against the backdrop of the first Arab-Israeli war and analyses the varied causes of the flight. The Jewish and Arab decision-making involved, on national and local levels, military and political, is described and explained, as is the crystallisation of Israel's decision to bar a refugee repatriation. The subsequent fate of the abandoned Arab villages, lands and urban neighbourhoods is examined. The study looks at the international context of the war and the exodus, and describes the political battle over the refugees' fate, which effectively ended with the deadlock at Lausanne in summer 1949. Throughout the book attempts to describe what happened rather than what successive generations of Israeli and Arab propagandists have said happened, and to explain the motives of the protagonists.
User reviews
Duzshura
Readers interested in Benny Morris should read Israeli historian Yehoshua Porath's "War and Remembrance" in the summer 2002 issue of Azure. Porath adds to the Oct. 1995 and April 1990 discussions by Robert Satloff and Shabtai Teveth in Middle Eastern Studies and to Efraim Karsh's excellent book, Fabricating Israeli History. Don't read this book without looking at these critiques.

Why? Morris et al tell readers they have written "new" history of Israel, considering the entire previous historical record as if it were solely propaganda for the Zionist cause. Here, Morris considers Jewish conduct in the 1947 and 1948, and why the Arabs fled.

Morris claims to be the first person to have looked at Israeli archives on the Dalet Plan, a plan to move populations in certain areas. Nevertheless, other scholars show that Morris and his peers in this book misrepresent themselves and the facts.

Firstly, Yigael Alon and Israel Galili, in The Book of the Palmah, gave Walid Khalidi material to argue in 1959 that the Dalet Plan was "the master plan of the Zionists" to expel Palestinians wholesale. Furthermore, Uri Millstein's 1973 History of the Hagana included the entire Dalet Plan text. Official or not, these 1959 and 1973 Israeli Jewish histories, very shortly after the the 1948 war, did not hide what happened, as Morris claims here. Furthermore, Uri Millstein also revisited the topic in his five-volume History of the War of Independence.

Morris also writes that Arab government archives were closed to his research and and to other historians writing on the Israeli-Arab conflict before him. He writes that he relied on Israeli and Western archives. But Porath, Karsh, Satloff and Teveth all show that this is not the case.

Furthermore, Morris did no research at the Hagannah archives or those of the IDF, a fact underlined by Efraim Karsh in 2002, and one which he admits in a more recent book (The War for Palestine). Morris now writes that in the mid 1980s both those archives were closed to all researchers after all. He writes, he was limited to few first-hand military materials, indicating that there is no "new" research here at all.

Morris' charge that Israel carried out a deliberate and systematic expulsion of the Palestinian Arabs isn't even remotely substantiated by extensive research done since the mid 1980s. On the contrary, Morris takes material very selectively, from Israeli archive fringes and makes what Porath terms "outrageously false claims"-- that Israel's victory resulted from "an imperialist conspiracy or an overwhelming advantage in manpower and arms."

Indeed, Morris writes here that Arabs left Israel because of many factors, their departure was not the fault of the Jewish people alone. Then, he contradicts himself, giving those who hate Israel grounds to blame Israel for the exodus, without considering the other circumstances.

This book also details a so-called "massacre" in 1948 of Arabs at the village of Deir Yassin, but not enough to mention that the incident was actually a battle--in which most Arabs killed (like those in Jenin in March and April 2002) were armed.

Finally, Morris does not note (by comparison) other massacres in 1948--of Jews, by Arabs. On December 30, 1947, for example, Arabs murdered some 50 Jewish co-workers at the Haifa refinery. On April 13, 1948, they massacred over 80 Jewish doctors, nurses and Hebrew University workers on Mount Scopus in Jerusalem.

Additionally, nearly all of the 131 people who surrendered at the Etzion Bloc were also murdered by Palestinian Arabs. Only two survived.

These latter Arab massacres of Jews do not fit the blame that Morris seeks to lay at Jewish feet. Nor does the fact that Jews did not afterward flee, as occurred on the Arab side following the battle at Deir Yassin. So Morris omits them.

I also find it disturbing that the book nowhere mentions the equal refugee claim of 1 million Jewish refugees from 22 Arab nations, who were expelled with nothing but the shirts on their backs, and rebuilt their lives in Israel, the U.S., and Europe.

The number of Jewish refugees was actually larger than that of Arab refugees (counting only those who fled, not their descendants). Honest history would have noted these parallels as well as the entire context of the war.

--Alyssa A. Lappen
Lcena
The issue of how the great bulk of the indigenous Arab Palestinians who constitued a majority of the people and landholders of the territory that became Israel after the 1948-1949 war is a topic of heated controversy. Israeli author Benny Morris weighs in with the revisionist perspective. (This is not to be confused with "Holocaust revisionism" a bogus line of thinking attempting to claim the Nazis did not commit genocide against Jews). The revisionist approach holds that contrary to official and popular opinion fostered by Israel, the Arab Palestinians did not evacuate in response to a generalized call by Arab leaders to leave in order to make way for Arab armies but that the Arabs fled due to a variety of factors, a great deal of which consisted of military pressure and terrorist acts by Jewish forces and actual organized forced expulsion by pre-state and post-state Israeli armed forces. Morris, using internal Israeli archives and a broad search of other sources, attempts to go village by village to analyze the causes of Arab flight or departure. It is a grand work of bravery and integrity by an Israeli author. Although the "revisionist" view has been close to standard in academic and intelligence circles (as well as of course, Arab, left-wing, and anti-Zionist polemic) for some time; it is only now penetrating popular perception in Israel and the United States. Morris also bravely looks at and exposes early Zionist leaders' expressed hopes and plans for the eventual "transfer" of the Arab population. Morris' one main drawback is that he is incomprehensibly apologistic regarding Israeli leader David Ben-Gurion, defensively portraying him as acting solely in response to circumstance and, despite the facts in Morris' very own book, not as a willfull ideological perpetrator of ethnic cleansing. Still, this book is sure to evoke rage in those who think Israeli revisionism is as evil and factually distorted as Holocaust revisionism but careful scholars and those interested in useful facts whic
ℓo√ﻉ
When it comes to the history of Israel and Palestine, it's hard to find good authors. Morris is one of the best.

This book should be mandatory reading for anyone seriously interested in this topic. It's not a particularly easy read, but it is shorter and more readable than Morris' "Righteous Victims" (which covers a much longer time period). Morris is VERY thorough with this history book. Some would probably say too thorough, but considering the subject matter, I think the thoroughness of this book is welcome.

I take serious issue with Morris' conclusion that the ethnic cleansing of 1947, 48 and 49 was not directed from the highest levels. Frankly, Morris' own detailed reporting even says otherwise. There are many times in this book where Morris talks about Ben Gurion not wanting to put anything in writing when it came to ethnic cleansing. Why? Because Ben Gurion knew that this could come back to haunt both him and the future generations of Israeli Jews. For Morris to then conclude that the atrocities were not directed from the people highest up in the Jewish government, is just beyond ridiculous. He couldn't find any written orders, but he says that Ben Gurion was very careful to not put anything in writing. That certainly doesn't prove that Ben Gurion and his cronies didn't order the ethnic cleansing. Morris' own Jewish/Israeli bias has definitely overcome his sense of reasonable commentary.

Despite the silly conclusion chapter, I found this book to be very worthwhile.