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Free eBook Consumers and Individuals in China: Standing Out, Fitting In (Chinese Worlds) download

by Michael B. Griffiths

Free eBook Consumers and Individuals in China: Standing Out, Fitting In (Chinese Worlds) download ISBN: 0415535727
Author: Michael B. Griffiths
Publisher: Routledge; 1 edition (December 10, 2012)
Language: English
Pages: 248
Category: Other
Subcategory: Business and Finance
Size MP3: 1588 mb
Size FLAC: 1543 mb
Rating: 4.4
Format: lit lrf rtf docx


The book begins with a profound critique of both these intellectual postures and goes on to develop an argument rooted in post-structuralist social theory that is ethnographically focused on culture as a fluid and changing environment within which individuals must struggle to position themselves. The method is daring, yet simple.

The book confronts the – still widespread – notion that Chinese consumers are not "real" individuals, and in doing so represents an ambitious . Michael B. Griffiths is Director of Ethnography at Ogilvy & Mather, Greater China.

The book confronts the – still widespread – notion that Chinese consumers are not "real" individuals, and in doing so represents an ambitious attempt to give a new twist to the structure versus agency debates in social theory. To this end, Michael B. Griffiths shows how claims to virtues such as authenticity, knowledge, civility, sociable character, moral proprietary and self-cultivation emerge from and give shape to social interaction.

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London: Routledge, 2013. The Chinese University of Hong Kong. Gordon Mathews, "Consumers and Individuals in China: Standing Out, Fitting In, by Michael B. Griffiths," The China Journal, no. 71 (January 2014): 242-244. Of all published articles, the following were the most read within the past 12 months. The New Silk Road and China’s Evolving Grand Strategy. Leverett et al. Grapes of Wrath: Twisting Arms to Get Villagers to Cooperate with Agribusiness in China.

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Palgrave Studies in Chinese Management. Consumers and Individuals in China: Standing Out, Fitting In, by Michael B. Griffiths Chinese Law in Imperial Eyes: Sovereignty, Justice, and Transcultural Politics. Griffiths January 2014 · The China Journal. Chinese Law in Imperial Eyes: Sovereignty, Justice, and Transcultural Politics. New York: Columbia University Press, 2016.

A new book, 'Consumers and Individuals in China: Standing Out, Fitting In' by Michael B. Griffiths, director of ethnography at Ogilvy & Mather Greater China, reflects on Chinese reality and challenges many a preconceived idea that its people are not ‘real’ individuals.

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Consumers and Individuals in China: standing out, fitting i. Griffiths, Michael . Malcolm Chapman & Flemming Christiansen. Farmers of Forty Centuries: organic farming in China, Korea, and Japan.

Consumers and Individuals in China: standing out, fitting in. London: Routledge. CrossRefGoogle Scholar. Chinese Consumers: the romantic reappraisal. Ethnography 11(3): 331–357. New York: Dover Publications. Kipnis, Andrew B. 2013. China Perspectives 3: 5–12. 2016. From Village to City: social transformation in a Chinese county seat.

Breaking new ground in the study of Chinese urban society, this book applies critical discourse analysis to ethnographic data gathered in Anshan, a third-tier city and market in northeast China. The book confronts the – still widespread – notion that Chinese consumers are not "real" individuals, and in doing so represents an ambitious attempt to give a new twist to the structure versus agency debates in social theory. To this end, Michael B. Griffiths shows how claims to virtues such as authenticity, knowledge, civility, sociable character, moral proprietary and self-cultivation emerge from and give shape to social interaction. Data material for this path-breaking analysis is drawn from informants as diverse as consumerist youths, dissident intellectuals, enterprising farmers, retired Party cadres, the rural migrant staff of an inner-city restaurant, the urban families dependent on a machine-repair workshop, and a range of white-collar professionals.

Consumers and Individuals in China: Standing out, fitting in, will appeal to sociologists, anthropologists, and cultural studies scholars, China Studies generalists, and professionals working at the intersection of culture and business in China. The vivid descriptions of living and doing fieldwork in China also mean that those travelling there will find the book stimulating and useful

User reviews
Mustard Forgotten
Anyone who reads Michael Griffith's Consumers and Individuals in China expecting to find the rule-bound marching morons of Confucian or Maoist stereotypes or the soulless search for niche markets presented "scientifically" is in for a big surprise. The book begins with a profound critique of both these intellectual postures and goes on to develop an argument rooted in post-structuralist social theory that is ethnographically focused on culture as a fluid and changing environment within which individuals must struggle to position themselves. The method is daring, yet simple. Talk to Chinese individuals with whose lives you are familiar and take seriously what they say as they tease out the ambiguities, conflicts and contradictions with which they wrestle. Do not explain away what they say. Do not swallow unthinkingly the stereotypes that the language they use may suggest. Listen and think about what you are hearing and what it might mean to someone who is living those lives, rural, urban, immigrant, young, old, entrepreneur, punk-styled beautician, nervous intellectual, retired factory worker....whatever the situation in which you find them. Listen and reflect on what they say in light of critical theory that suggests new questions unasked by other Sinologists and treat what these Chinese individuals say as part of the conversation instead of just grist for the theorist's mill.

The result is not at times an easy book to read, but it is an important one and well worth the effort it takes to join these conversations.
Kazigrel
"Standing out, Fitting in" is definetively the best description for this book. Stand out of everything you ever thought about chinese culture, consumers and identity. After reading this book you will fit in a new and contemporary concept and will find out that chinese individuals are much more alike ocidental individuals than most people (and that includes researchers and marketers) used to think they were. As an extra feature, it's not necessary to go deep in chinese history because the author summarises the contemporary history of Chine in Introduction and after that we can easily and widely read all the content without fancy words or difficult vocabulary. You won't need a dictionary to read this book because it was written for being read and not to be stuck in a bookshelf. Take your chance. By knowing better chinese individuals and their consumerism it was easier for me to open my eyes (and mind) to my own culture.
ᴜɴɪᴄᴏʀɴ
I read through Michael's book in a chapter hopping manner. A good test of a non-fiction book is that it makes sense even if you read it backwards, and his book does. For someone who has dealt with China, and the Chinese, for a long time, I would say there are no great revelations in this book (for me), but what it does very well is to identify and explain the key societal factors shaping the way people behave, both as individuals and as groups.

This would be the perfect book for many foreign business types to read and get to know who the bloody Hell they are supposed to be selling their products and services to in China. The problem is that most of the execs who ought to read this book will not because it is an erudite and exhaustive study. It does not come in sound-bite-sized, bulletted, easy-to-digest gobbets of marketing speak, or guided by primary school poster-like "infographics" and "edgy" design tags to hammer-in the leitmotiv of each section.

Such a very scholarly work should be read by smart execs, but I fear that many who should won't because it requires the reader to exert some concentration. However, those who do read it will learn a lot about many key aspects of what it is like to be Chinese and live in China now, much of which otherwise either goes largely unreported or glossed over.

That said, the book is full of personal anecdotal illustration which speaks volumes both about the subject and the author's hands-on experience.

Michael's concluding remarks are that he hopes his book would be the spark that ignites further research and better understanding about Chinese society and how it is changing. Given that I continue to have eyebrow-raising revelations about different aspects of China even after having spent far too many years researching and writing about China's society and consumer markets, I heartily agree that such continued study will remain very necessary.

I think the legacy of this book will be that it will stand as a primary reference on this subject for a long time to come, and a benchmark for the way research in this field should be conducted in the future. It helps to prove that what you get from consumer surveys cannot reflect or replace the reality gained from first-hand, meet the people, experience.

Among the myriad of books on China's consumer economy, this is one to keep on the corner of your desk, within easy reach for a reality refresher.
SING
With his book "Consumers and Individuals in China - Standing Out and Fitting In" Michael B. Griffiths has done an outstanding job and the research documented here is indeed one of a kind.

Reading Dr. Griffiths' book - being a foreigner myself with, so far and still counting, 5 years of hands-on living and working experience in China - took me through lots of "Spot on" and "Yes, I have seen/met that too" moments, but also quite a few "why didn't I think of that?" when I read about reactions and comments that I too in my own way have come across. The book in many ways made me think closer about what I have experienced myself during my time in China and it definitely made my eyes open wider. I am quite sure that I can't be the only reader left with that impression. So true when, as part of the book's conclusion, Dr. Griffiths points to the fact that " "individualism" versus "collectivism" just doesn't cut it".

How nice it would be if more of the abundant number of outside China experts - many of whom also frequently happen to be intercultural consultants, trainers and coaches - would come to realize that and then begin to dig a bit deeper in order to better understand the Chinese and life in China as it is today.

An excellent place to start would be by reading Dr. Griffiths' book.