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Free eBook Blue Collar Blues: Is Trade to Blame for Rising US Income Inequality? (Policy Analyses in International Economics) download

by Robert Lawrence

Free eBook Blue Collar Blues: Is Trade to Blame for Rising US Income Inequality? (Policy Analyses in International Economics) download ISBN: 0881324140
Author: Robert Lawrence
Publisher: Peterson Institute for International Economics; 1 edition (January 1, 2008)
Language: English
Pages: 144
Category: Other
Subcategory: Business and Finance
Size MP3: 1817 mb
Size FLAC: 1213 mb
Rating: 4.8
Format: lrf mobi docx lrf


Robert Z. Lawrence, 2008

Rising income inequality and slow real wage growth since 2000 reflect strong profit growth, much of which may be cyclical, and dramatic income gains for the top 1 percent of wage earners, a development that is more closely related to asset-market performance and technological and institutional innovations rather than conventional trade in goods and services. Robert Z. Lawrence, 2008

Robert Z. Lawrence, 2008

5 The US economy has also become increasingly open to trade.

5 The US economy has also become increasingly open to trade. Paul Krugman: "It s no longer safe to assert that trade's impact on the income distribution in wealthy countries is fairly minor. Second, what role has trade played in increasing each type of inequality? 9 Main finding: trade is not to blame! Despite the growth of imports from developing countries, trade's impact on recent wage inequality has not been large; indeed, since 1999 by many measures, wage inequality has not increased at all.

Policy Analyses in International Economics 8.

Policy Analyses in International Economics 85. Lawrence (PIIE). View Sharing Options. Lawrence deconstructs the gap in real blue-collar wages and labor productivity growth between 1981 and 2006 and estimates how much higher these wages might have been had income growth been distributed proportionately and how much of the gap is due to measurement and technical factors about which little can be done.

The Institute released Blue Collar Blues: Is Trade to Blame for Rising US Income Inequality?, a major new study that examines the relationship between trade and US income inequality, on February 7, 2008.

TAGS International Economics, Household income in the United States, Income distribution. Globalization and Inequality - Chapter 4. Globalization and Inequalit. What students are saying. Most Popular Documents for ECON. Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern.

Business & Economics. Moreover, in the conclusion of this paper, I show how the notion of equilibrium that emerges from the analysis could be useful to address the issue of dynamics. Course of Income Inequality in Turkey.

In a new book, Blue Collar Blues, he points out that the . Blue Collar Blues: Is Trade to Blame for Rising US Income Inequality?, by Robert Z. Lawrence, Peterson Institute for International Economics, January 2008.

In a new book, Blue Collar Blues, he points out that the contours of American inequality sit ill with the idea that trade with poor countries is to blame. Once you measure income properly, the gap between white- and blue-collar workers has not risen that much since the late 1990s when China's global integration accelerated.

Blue collar blues: Is trade to blame for rising US income inequality? . Now, as the world struggles to recover, it's tempting to blame what happened on just a few greedy bankers who took irrational risks and left the rest of us to foot the bill

Blue collar blues: Is trade to blame for rising US income inequality? Washinghton, DC: Peterson Institute for International Economics. Now, as the world struggles to recover, it's tempting to blame what happened on just a few greedy bankers who took irrational risks and left the rest of us to foot the bill. In Fault Lines, Rajan argues that serious flaws in the economy are also to blame, and warns that a potentially more devastating crisis awaits us if they aren't fixed.

International trade accounts for only a small share of growing income inequality and labor-market displacement in the United States. Lawrence deconstructs the gap in real blue-collar wages and labor productivity growth between 1981 and 2006 and estimates how much higher these wages might have been had income growth been distributed proportionately and how much of the gap is due to measurement and technical factors about which little can be done.While increased trade with developing countries may have played some part in causing greater inequality in the 1980s, surprisingly, over the past decade the impact of such trade on inequality has been relatively small. Many imports are no longer produced in the United States, and US goods and services that do compete with imports are not particularly intensive in unskilled labor. Rising income inequality and slow real wage growth since 2000 reflect strong profit growth, much of which may be cyclical, and dramatic income gains for the top 1 percent of wage earners, a development that is more closely related to asset-market performance and technological and institutional innovations rather than conventional trade in goods and services. The minor role of trade, therefore, suggests that any policy that focuses narrowly on trade to deal with wage inequality and job loss is likely to be ineffective. Instead, policymakers should (a) use the tax system to improve income distribution and (b) implement adjustment policies to deal more generally with worker and community dislocation.