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Free eBook To Jerusalem and Back: A Personal Account download

by Saul Bellow

Free eBook To Jerusalem and Back: A Personal Account download ISBN: 014007273X
Author: Saul Bellow
Publisher: Penguin Books (October 1, 1985)
Language: English
Pages: 192
Category: Mention
Subcategory: Writing Research and Publishing Guides
Size MP3: 1764 mb
Size FLAC: 1267 mb
Rating: 4.4
Format: lrf docx txt mbr


To Jerusalem and Back book. This extraordinary book is the result of Saul Bellow's sojourn in Israel.

To Jerusalem and Back book.

To Jerusalem and Back chronicles Saul Bellow's trip to Israel in the mid-70s. Bellow came to Jerusalem as celebrated novelist. Every door was open to him, and he met with Israelis from all walks of life

To Jerusalem and Back chronicles Saul Bellow's trip to Israel in the mid-70s. As such, it is a time capsule of that time and place. Palestinian groups are still Marxist-Leninist. Every door was open to him, and he met with Israelis from all walks of life. He knows the score in terms of the Jewish past, the great sufferings many of the survivors living in Israel have gone through. He understands the constant threat from their Arab neighbors under which Israel lives.

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Bellow, Saul, Authors, American, Arab-Israeli conflict. Books for People with Print Disabilities. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata). Terms of Service (last updated 12/31/2014).

He received three National Book Awards

Saul Bellow was born June 10th, 1915, in Lachine, Quebec, Canada, the son of Jewish immigrants from St. Petersburg, Russia. His family later moved to Chicago, the site of many of his future works. He received three National Book Awards. Included among his works are Seize the Day (1956), Henderson the Rain King (1959), Herzog (1964), Mr. Sammler's Planet (1970), To Jerusalem and Back (1976), Him With His Foot in His Mouth and Other Stories (1984), More Die of Heartbreak (1987), and Something to Remember Me By (1990).

In 1975, Saul Bellow traveled through Israel, turning .

In 1975, Saul Bellow traveled through Israel, turning his keen powers of observation upon the country he did not know. This book is a record of his stay-his personal experiences and fleeting impressions-and a reflection upon what he ultimately learned about the hallowed land.

This is a book from the 1970s, covering some of Saul Bellow's encounters in Jerusalem and his reflections on the Arab-Israeli . omegaomega0515, July 12, 2010.

This is a book from the 1970s, covering some of Saul Bellow's encounters in Jerusalem and his reflections on the Arab-Israeli conflict. A lot has changed since then: for example, the Cold War has ended and there is no need to spend that much time conjecturing Russia's stance on the issue. But more has remained the same, although 30 years have elapsed since the writing of the book.

Saul Bellow's fiction, honored by a Nobel Prize and a Pulitzer, among other awards, has made him a literary giant. Now the man himself and a lifetime of his insightful views on a range of topics spring off the page in this, his first nonfiction collection, which encompasses articles, lectures, essays, travel pieces, and an "Autobiography of Ideas. History & Fiction.

Bellow’s exploration of a beautiful and troubled city is a powerful testament to the unique spirit and challenges of Israel, its history and its future. Other Titles of Interest. More Die of Heartbreak.

User reviews
Wizard
Book written in early 1970s, and sadly, much of the commentary could be describing today.....worth reading as written by Saul Bellow
showtime
It's stunning how clearly, comprehensively and far-sightedly Bellow saw the situation in Israel. Forty years later, it's like reading last week's news analysis from the Middle East. If he hadn't been one of the great novelists of the 20th century, Bellow might have been one of its greatest journalists.
Contancia
Easy read
Coiril
...the more they remain the same. I was in Jerusalem, the Galilee, and Jordan last year. The people in charge are different. The people at every level are saying the same things.

This book is written in Bellow's wonderful mix of incisive analysis and subjective transparency. I love his writing and loved the book, though it makes me sad. Mailed a copy to my travel companions.
AfinaS
How can one describe this classic book on Israel? At one level it is a personal account of one American writer's journey to Israel and England and back but scratch beneath the surface and you see the incredible panoply of faces and voices that is Israel. Here is A.B. Yehoshoua who writes "that because our spiritual life ... cannot revolve around anything but [political questions], you cannot spare yourself, spiritually, for other things." Here is a bomb going off in London just as it recently did in Israel. And here is Saul Bellow mourning the "six young [British] people" who were murdered while simultaneously noting that "the difference is that when a bomb goes off in a West End restaurant the fundamental right of England to exist is not in dispute."
Here is Abu Zuluf, editor of El Kuds whose automobile terrorists have blown up because he is trying to follow what Saul Bellow feels is a "line of conciliation and peace."
Here is the Greek quarter in Jerusalem covered in grapevine; there is the Jewish quarter where the principal relic is the ben-Zakkai synagogue, blown up by the Jordanians when they took over in 1948 and as Saul Bellow walks toward it he hears, somewhere, as Arab boys are racing their donkeys down a hill.
Here is a Yemenite synagogue; there a Souk, the public market. And everywhere there is a profusion of communities: Arabs, Jews from Arab lands, Asian lands, Europe, Africa, Christians, Kurds, Hindus.... Everywhere a cacophony of voices; everywhere people mingling, arguing, making peace, making war, while philosophers philosophize and writers write.
And he sits down to dinner with families who have lost children and as he passes dishes (Sephardic dishes, Indian dishes, Arab dishes, European dishes all mixed together) "on the Jaffa Road, because of another bomb, six adolescents-two on a break from school-stopping at a coffee shop to eat buns, have just died."
"This is how we live, mister," a cabby tells Bellow (in what language: Ladino, Hebrew, Arabic?), "his voice cracking. "Okay? We live this way."
Yramede
To Jerusalem and Back chronicles Saul Bellow's trip to Israel in the mid-70s. As such, it is a time capsule of that time and place. Palestinian groups are still Marxist-Leninist. There is almost no stirring of the Islamic revolution to come. Rabin is the Prime Minister during his first term; Egypt and Israel have just reached the interim agreement that would later become the Camp David accords. The tone of this work is dark, pessimistic. Bellow believed the conflict would go on as it was for generations. In a sense he was right, but in another quite wrong. For this book also shows the progress that has been made since the mid-70s. Israel has signed peace agreements with both Egypt and Jordan. It is an economic powerhouse with a stable economy,high tech jobs, universal health care. Israel still fears for its existence, but it is a more illusory fear than at the time of this book. It is less existential and fundamental. It is more about style than outcome. So in this very narrow sense, To Jerusalem and Back is an interesting work to read in light of later developments.
Oghmaghma
Bellow came to Jerusalem as celebrated novelist . Every door was open to him , and he met with Israelis from all walks of life. He writes an essentially sympathetic and understanding account of Israel and its special situation. He knows the score in terms of the Jewish past, the great sufferings many of the survivors living in Israel have gone through. He understands the constant threat from their Arab neighbors under which Israel lives. But he tries to see the situation too with sympathy for the Arab side. His basic line politically is of the left, and he clearly favors political compromise.

The book does provide a pretty fair picture of Israeli society. But it is possible to quarrel with Bellow's basic orientation which is that of a Diaspora Jew who does not feel any call to Aliyah to Israel, and does not have much understanding or sympathy for a good share of its population, the religious.

All in all though this is an insightful look into Israeli society by a commentator of great intelligence and literary skill.