» » In Ethiopia with a Mule

Free eBook In Ethiopia with a Mule download

by Dervla Murphy

Free eBook In Ethiopia with a Mule download ISBN: 0712603441
Author: Dervla Murphy
Publisher: Century Publishers; New edition edition (1984)
Language: English
Pages: 304
Category: Mention
Subcategory: Writing Research and Publishing Guides
Size MP3: 1929 mb
Size FLAC: 1276 mb
Rating: 4.1
Format: doc lrf azw rtf


Dervla Murphy (born 28 November 1931) is an Irish touring cyclist and author of adventure travel books for over 40 years.

Dervla Murphy (born 28 November 1931) is an Irish touring cyclist and author of adventure travel books for over 40 years. Murphy is best known for her 1965 book Full Tilt: Ireland to India With a Bicycle, about an overland cycling trip through Europe, Iran, Afghanistan, Pakistan and India. She followed this with volunteer work helping Tibetan refugees in India and Nepal and trekking with a mule through Ethiopia.

Dervla Murphy set out with her pack-mule, Jock, on a hazardous trek through Ethiopia's remote and hostile regions. Despite being robbed three times, Dervla Murphy found the Ethiopian highlanders were unusually hospitable. Inspired by stories of Prester John and the Queen of Sheba, she hoped to find there beauty, danger, solitude and mystery. Despite being robbed three times, Dervla Murphy found the Ethiopian highlanders were unusually hospitable

In Ethiopia with a Mule DERVLA MURPHY A diversification among human communities is essential for the .

In Ethiopia with a Mule DERVLA MURPHY A diversification among human communities is essential for the provision of the incentive and material for the Odyssey of the human spirit. I read most of the recently published books on Ethiopia and carefully studied Wax and Gold – which greatly increased the pleasure of my journey, for without Dr Levine’s sympathetic analysis of the Amharic culture I would have gone wandering through the highlands in a permanent daze of incomprehension.

In Ethiopia with a Mule - Dervla Murphy. Unfortunately other books inexplicably accumulated in my rucksack between London and Massawah and when climbing to the 8,000-foot Eritrean plateau I found myself carrying a weight of fifty pounds. I had been warned – by people who knew people who knew people who had been to Ethiopia – that the Ethiopian authorities distrust foreigners and would only give me a thirty-day tourist visa.

In Ethiopia with a Mule book. Murphy normally travels Dervla Murphy is an Irish touring cyclist and author of adventure travel books for over 40 years

In Ethiopia with a Mule book. Murphy normally travels Dervla Murphy is an Irish touring cyclist and author of adventure travel books for over 40 years. She is best known for her 1965 book Full Tilt: Ireland to India With a Bicycle, about an overland cycling trip through Europe, Iran, Afghanistan, Pakistan and India. Murphy is a famous speaker and writer on Palestinian issues.

Dervla Murphy ong the most romantic in Africa – has been completed by rows of shacks, a petrol station and a textile factory. Beyond the bridge we left the motor-road, went north-east for a few miles through rough scrubland, climbed a forested hill and slithered down to wide, hot grasslands, where the issue was confused by many rivers.

I’ve never actually met Dervla Murphy, but I worked with her in 1990–91 when she was one of. .Here she visits Ethiopia in 1966–7, walking most of the way from the Red Sea to Addis Ababa with a helpful mule who she christens Jock.

I’ve never actually met Dervla Murphy, but I worked with her in 1990–91 when she was one of the judges of the Christopher Ewart-Biggs Prize and I was the prize’s administrator (my career of literar.

You're getting the VIP treatment! With the purchase of Kobo VIP Membership, you're getting 10% off and 2x Kobo Super Points on eligible items. Your Shopping Cart is empty. There are currently no items in your Shopping Cart.

In Ethiopia with a mule. by. Murphy, Dervla, 1931-. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Inspired by childhood stories of Prester John and the Queen of Sheba, in 1966 Dervla Murphy bought Jock, an amiable pack-mule, and set off to trek across the highlands of this awesome but troubled land

In Ethiopia with a Mule. Inspired by childhood stories of Prester John and the Queen of Sheba, in 1966 Dervla Murphy bought Jock, an amiable pack-mule, and set off to trek across the highlands of this awesome but troubled land. She wandered south from the Red Sea shore to Sheba's Aksum and up onto the icy roof of Africa, the Semien mountains. From there she descended to the ruined palaces of Gondar and skirted the northern shore of Lake Tana before crossing the drought-afflicted high ranges to Lalibela

An account of a gruelling journey through remote and hostile regions of Ethiopia, alone except for a pack-mule. Originally published in 1968.
User reviews
Bumand
I always enjoy Dervla Murphy's books.
Jaberini
It's a great book.
I didn't notice that it didn't have any pictures when I bought it, so I'm disappointed. My library's version has pictures
Nilasida
Having lived int Ethiopia for two years, I respect the authenticity of the experiences that she describes. She's much more rugged and adventuresome than I ever was or ever would be.
Nalme
A very gutsy woman, give her that at least, and an inspiring peripatetic who took so many of the world's paths less traveled. She's written books on her travels in the Andes, Madagascar, Siberia, and other exotic locals. But she first gained fame for riding a bike, leaving her home in Ireland, starting at Dunkirk, and following one of the traditional overland routes into India - alone, in 1963. Her book on the trip is Full Tilt: Ireland to India with a Bicycle. Not that long thereafter, the lure of the remoter lands of the world called again, and she undertook the subject of this book, a solo walk with a mule in Ethiopia, for 1000 miles, during the first three months of 1967.

In the Prologue, she quotes Edward Gibbon on Ethiopia: "Encompassed on all sides by the enemies of their religion, the Ethiopians slept near a thousand years, forgetful of the world by whom they were forgotten." And that is precisely the "charm" of Ethiopia for the traveler, if not the residents. It is quite different from all the surrounding countries, and, like Burma, in many ways an immense open-air museum. In the highland area of the country, the elevation ranges between 6,000 and 15,000 ft, overall a salubrious climate. She started her journey in the Red Sea port of Massawah, in what is now Eritrea. She did take a truck up to the highlands, and supplemented her walking with a plane ride and a journey in a Land Rover. She covered all the core sites of historical interest in the highlands, which include the steles at Aksum, the former capital of Gondar, Lake Tana, which is the headwaters of the Blue Nile, and Lalibela, with their famous churches carved out of solid rock.

She is a reasonably astute observer of the people and the natural world. Injara and wat (the bread and stew) are the unique culinary staples of the country. The Coptic (Christian) clergy are dominate and the author notes that there are 70,000 of them, compared to only 70 doctors. Confirming my own experience with them, Murphy says: "It is unfortunate that so many tourists get their only impression of the highland peasantry from meeting priests as such places as Aksum, Gondar and Lalibela. Donald Levine has remarked with restraint that `though there are devout and kindly men among them, the Ethiopian priests have never been particularly noted for their moral qualities.' Exercising less restraint, I would add that the highland priesthood seems to attract the worst type of highlander- or rather to breed him since the priesthood is mainly hereditary."

Concerning the practice that transcends religion, but is rooted in the area of the Eastern horn of Africa, what Murphy describes as the excision of the clitoris, (now more properly referred to as female genital mutilation) she discusses that the women are generally "less responsive" than European or American women, and she drolly says: "`Ethiopian men don't know the difference, but in fact they're biting off their noses to spite their faces.' Which observation tempted me to amend the old saying, but since it seemed best to keep the conversation on a scientific level I resisted the temptation."

In the Epilogue she concludes with the remark: "A traveler who does not speak their language cannot presume to claim any deep understanding of the Ethiopian highlanders." And that is part of the problem with the book: it is a travelogue, with numerous incisive anecdotes, but without an overall conceptual structure. Bluntly, she did not seem to do her homework before arriving. Furthermore, I was disturbed that she always had to rely on "the kindness of strangers"; she could never saddle up her own mule, but had to rely on some man that she just met! And she must have caused significant anxiety in officialdom: an unaccompanied white woman traveling in a fashion that is not in a culturally acceptable fashion; a whim that had to be suffered until they got her safely out of their area of responsibility.

I enjoyed five days in the highlands, in 1984, visiting many of the same areas, though Aksum was off limits, and Lalibela had just fallen to the Tigre People's Liberation Front. Ethiopia IS a fascinating country, and Murphy's account is a highly recommended introduction. Due to the shortcoming above though, I'd give it only 4-stars.
Xanna
This is one of the most delightful travel books I've ever read. Ms. Murphy is a fearless and intelligent traveler with a real gift for writing, and I don't know how you could beat that combination for writing about travel. She apparently routinely does things that no sane Westerner would ever try, making her something of a Crocodile Hunter of the travel set.

I'm eagerly awaiting my chance to read the rest of her books, and I doubt there's better praise than that.