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Free eBook Stanley: The Making of an African Explorer (Lives letters) download

by F.J. McLynn

Free eBook Stanley: The Making of an African Explorer (Lives  letters) download ISBN: 0192827766
Author: F.J. McLynn
Publisher: Oxford Paperbacks (March 21, 1991)
Language: English
Pages: 411
Category: Mention
Subcategory: Writing Research and Publishing Guides
Size MP3: 1537 mb
Size FLAC: 1895 mb
Rating: 4.6
Format: lrf mobi doc rtf


The celebrated African explorer Sir Henry Morton Stanley was one of the most fascinating of the . The reason this book seems to suddenly stop half way through Stanley's illustrious career is that it is part 1 of a two-volume biography

The celebrated African explorer Sir Henry Morton Stanley was one of the most fascinating of the late–Victorian adventurers. Born into poverty and illegitimacy, he survived a series of incredible adventures at sea and in the . emerging as a talented journalist. His writing led to a commission to find David Livingstone, the greatest single feat in African exploration. The reason this book seems to suddenly stop half way through Stanley's illustrious career is that it is part 1 of a two-volume biography. For part 2, see Stanley - Sorcerer's apprentice also by Frank McLynn.

Covers Stanley's early life in great detail, much of which was obfuscated by Stanley in his autobiographies. And my last complaint was that a book like this could use better maps.

Librivox Free Audiobook. Afrique noire - Découverte et exploration anglaises, Africa south of the Sahara Exploration Stanley, . (Henry Morton), 1841-1904. software All Software latest This Just In Old School Emulation MS-DOS Games Historical Software Classic PC Games Software Library. image All Image latest This Just In Flickr Commons Occupy Wall Street Flickr Cover Art USGS Maps. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china.

Every page goes through several hundred of perfecting techniques; in live mode. Stanley: The Making of an African Explorer, 1841–1877 (1990), Scarborough House Publishers.

Every page goes through several hundred of perfecting techniques; in live mode. From the Sierras to the Pampas: Richard Burton’s Travels in the Americas, 1860–69 (1991), Trafalgar Square. Stanley: Sorcerer's Apprentice (1992), Oxford University Press. Snow upon the Desert: The Life of Sir Richard Burton (1993), John Murray Publishers Ltd. Hearts of Darkness: The European Exploration of Africa (1993), Carroll & Graf Pub.

This biography recounts the life of the eccentric and indomitable African explorer Henry M. Stanley, who circumnavigated the Lakes Tanganyika and Victoria, fixed the source of the Nile, and traveled the length of the Congo River.

i Stanley's birthplace, an engraving in Cadwalader Rowlands Henry M. Stanley: the Story of his Life . During my trip, it first dawned on me why nineteenth-century explorers had needed a hundred or more African porters to accompany them into the interior. Stanley: the Story of his Life (187z) 18. z Civil War - Camp Douglas, a pencil drawing in Hermann W. Williams The Civil War: The Artists' Record (119611-1196z) 4.

Stanley: The Making of an African Explorer by . Henry Miller and James Laughlin: Selected Letters by Henry Miller - Little Brown Book Group - ISBN 10 0094757704 - ISBN 13 0094757704 . idaoo Art, Health. McLynn - Constable and Company Ltd - ISBN 10 0094624208 - ISBN 13 0094624208 - Preparin. idaoo Art, Health, Biography. Portrait of Sheridan by Stanley Ayling - Little Brown Book Group - ISBN 10 0094653801 - ISBN 13 0094653801 - Preparing Portrait of Sherida.

Sir Henry Morton Stanley, is known popularly for his celebrated meeting with David Livingstone. But Stanley is by any reckoning a key figure in the history of the European penetration of the African continent. He was also a man of intriguing psychological complexity - a complexity which Frank McLynn seeks to understand. In this book the author focuses on the years 1841-1877, the most dramatic and fascinating years of Stanley's long life. Stanley was one of the great achievers of the 19th century. Born in poverty and illegitimacy, with an infancy spent in a Welsh workhouse, he survived a series of incredible adventures at sea and in the USA to emerge as a journalist of talent after the American Civil War. His courage on the British Ethiopian expedition to chastise Emperor Theodore brought him to the attention of James Gordon Bennett, proprieter of the "New York Herald Tribune" who commissioned him to find Livingstone in darkest Africa. His historic meeting with Livingstone at Ujiji in 1871 ("Dr Livingstone, I presume") was the scoop of the century. It brought him fame and fortune and the opportunity to carry out the greatest single feat in the whole of African exploration: crossing the continent from east to west and following the Congo to its Atlantic mouth. Behind these monumental achievements was a man who was a pathological liar, with sadomasochistic tendencies, who himself occupied a blurred middle-ground between fantasy and reality.
User reviews
Vivaral
McLynn's portrait of Stanley is very readable and exhaustively researched. It makes a also great story. Stanley has a fascinating background and warped psyche--all things that McLynn develops; he also provides an interesting psychological analysis to help explain the explorer's personality flaws. At the same time, McLynn provides a compelling and balanced account of Stanley's contributions to European "exploration" of Africa as well as his search for Livingstone. I found the book fascinating!
I am hcv men
The reason this book seems to suddenly stop half way through Stanley's illustrious career is that it is part 1 of a two-volume biography. For part 2, see Stanley - Sorcerer's apprentice also by Frank McLynn.

McLynn's biography of Stanley is well researched, and worth reading. McLynn describes it as a "psychobiography", and he attempts to read between the lines of the historical record to a certain degree to "uncover the inner man behind the explorer's mask". It's impossible to say now, more than a century after Stanley's death, how close to the mark he came, but this first volume in particular should probably not be taken entirely as unvarnished fact. His ideas about Stanley's character are certainly well presented and defensible in any case. If you want a fascinating read, get and read both volumes.

The Last Hero by Peter Forbath (I think) is another extremely well done novelization of Stanley's Emin Pasha expedition. Someone needs to make a movie.
Felolv
Great and thank you.
Sirara
In retelling the life of Stanley, I would like to review two books, Frank McLynn's Stanley and Adam Hochschild's King Leopold's Ghost. It was in reading the latter that I discovered the incredible like of Stanley, which led to my ordering the former. Although Hochschild's book is only party about Stanley, it adds important insights that complete McLynn's work. So many things strike one as being incredible in both of these biographies that I hardly know where to start. As a child Stanley was led into an imposing building by his mother who said she would have to enter an adjoining room for a few minutes to take care of some business. She then abandoned her son, leaving him in an English workhouse. Psychologists say that a child's worse nightmare is the fear of being abandoned. I can bear this out personally: at the age of 5 I was `'lost'' in a department story for an hour or so. I can still see myself (my very first memory, one as clearly as day), screaming for all I was worth, until my mother came for me. Stanley (whose name wasn't Stanley then) experienced nightly horrors so terrible that he never was able to react sexually in a normal fashion thereafter--some say he never even consummated (what a word!) his marriage when it finally occurred late in life. He became a sadomasochist, always accompanied by a young boy he could browbeat and humiliate (supposedly nothing more), never caring a damn about who died during his expeditions. He was a liar, lying about everything from his name to where he was born (he insisted he was an American) to when he was born. But then he did incredible feats of exploration that put him squarely in the category of the seafaring Cook, and he found Livingston, supposedly the only man he ever respected. My own books can be found on Amazon under Michael Hone.