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Free eBook Grammar as Science (The MIT Press) download

by Kimiko Ryokai,Richard K. Larson

Free eBook Grammar as Science (The MIT Press) download ISBN: 026251303X
Author: Kimiko Ryokai,Richard K. Larson
Publisher: The MIT Press; Reprint edition (December 30, 2009)
Language: English
Pages: 456
Category: Mention
Subcategory: Words Language and Grammar
Size MP3: 1491 mb
Size FLAC: 1171 mb
Rating: 4.3
Format: doc lrf rtf mobi


I found it pointless and patronizing, and it's a good example of the tortuous style that dominates throughout the book.

Only 3 left in stock (more on the way). I found it pointless and patronizing, and it's a good example of the tortuous style that dominates throughout the book. If they wanted to present syntax as a children's story, they shouldn't have used the word 'science' in the title. If the author respected his audience as scientists (or students of science), he wouldn't have introduced the subject matter with asinine metaphors and fallacious explanations of the core concepts.

Grammar as Science is constructed as a laboratory science course in which students actively experiment with linguistic . MIT Press began publishing journals in 1970 with the first volumes of Linguistic Inquiry and the Journal of Interdisciplinary History

Grammar as Science is constructed as a laboratory science course in which students actively experiment with linguistic data. Students are encouraged to try the rules out, and build grammars rule-by-rule, checking the consequences at each stage. MIT Press began publishing journals in 1970 with the first volumes of Linguistic Inquiry and the Journal of Interdisciplinary History. Today we publish over 30 titles in the arts and humanities, social sciences, and science and technology.

Grammar as Science is constructed as a "laboratory science" course in which students actively experiment with linguistic data

Grammar as Science is constructed as a "laboratory science" course in which students actively experiment with linguistic data. Students are encouraged to "try the rules out," and build grammars rule-by-rule, checking the consequences at each stage. Скачать (pdf, . 0 Mb) Читать. Epub FB2 mobi txt RTF.

illustrations by Kimiko Ryokai. Text by Richard K. Larson Graphic design by Kimiko Ryokai. Supported by the National Science Foundation The MIT Press Cambridge, Massachusetts London, England. No part of this book may be reproduced in any form by any electronic or mechanical means (including photocopying, recording, or information storage and retrieval) without permission in writing from the publisher. For information about special quantity discounts, please e-mail special salesress.

Richard K. Larson illustrations by Kimiko Ryokai

Richard K. Larson illustrations by Kimiko Ryokai. Grammar as Science Text by Richard K. Supported by the National Science Foundation. The MIT Press Cambridge, Massachusetts London, England. 2010 Massachusetts Institute of Technology All rights reserved. The answers embodied in Grammar as Science are the following: 1. Syntax offers an excellent instrument for introducing students from a wide variety of backgrounds to the principles of scientic theorizing and scientic thought.

by Larson, Larson, Ryokai Richard K. Larson is Professor of Linguistics at Stony Brook University.

by Larson, Larson, Ryokai. If you are a new instructor to The MIT Press eTextbooks, please use the button below to register. Richard K.

Grammar as Science book. Larson, Kimiko Ryokai. Grammar as Science offers an introduction to syntax as an exercise in scientific theory construction. Syntax provides an excellent instrument for introducing students from a wide variety of An introduction to the study of syntax that also introduces students to the principles of scientific theorizing. This introductory text takes a novel approach to the study of syntax.

by Richard K. Larson. series The MIT Press. Grammar as Science is constructed as a laboratory science course in which students actively experiment with linguistic data. The book is intended for students majoring in linguistics as well as non-linguistics majors who are taking the course to fulfill undergraduate requirements. Grammar as Science covers such core topics in syntax as phrase structure, constituency, the lexicon, inaudible elements, movement rules, and transformational constraints, while emphasizing scientific reasoning skills. Larson Larson’s book is an engaging and delightfully lucid introduction to the scientific nature of linguistic argumentation.

This new introductory text examines syntax as an exercise in scientific theory construction, and covers such core topics in syntax as phrase structure, constituency, the lexicon, inaudible elements, movement rules, and transformational constraints. Larson’s book is an engaging and delightfully lucid introduction to the scientific nature of linguistic argumentation. While thoroughly covering the basics of syntax, it also shows students explicitly how to 'think like a linguist

Cambridge MA: MIT Press.

Cambridge MA: MIT Press. Prerequisites: Syntax I Course contents: The Seminar examines problems.

An introduction to the study of syntax that also introduces students to the principles of scientific theorizing.

This introductory text takes a novel approach to the study of syntax. Grammar as Science offers an introduction to syntax as an exercise in scientific theory construction. Syntax provides an excellent instrument for introducing students from a wide variety of backgrounds to the principles of scientific theorizing and scientific thought; it engages general intellectual themes present in all scientific theorizing as well as those arising specifically within the modern cognitive sciences. The book is intended for students majoring in linguistics as well as non-linguistics majors who are taking the course to fulfill undergraduate requirements. Grammar as Science covers such core topics in syntax as phrase structure, constituency, the lexicon, inaudible elements, movement rules, and transformational constraints, while emphasizing scientific reasoning skills. The individual units are organized thematically into sections that highlight important components of this enterprise, including choosing between theories, constructing explicit arguments for hypotheses, and the conflicting demands that push us toward expanding our technical toolkit on the one hand and constraining it on the other.

Grammar as Science is constructed as a “laboratory science” course in which students actively experiment with linguistic data. Syntactica, a software application tool that allows students to create and explore simple grammars in a graphical, interactive way, is available online in conjunction with the book. Students are encouraged to “try the rules out,” and build grammars rule-by-rule, checking the consequences at each stage.

User reviews
Cerar
The eBook does not include the real page numbers. It makes it impossible to follow class reading assignments that are assigned using only page numbers.
Beazezius
I majored in Linguistics for my bachelor's and this textbook was used in my Syntax class in 2011. I had no previous experience with syntax except about a week's worth of overview in Intro to Linguistics. I have read all 28 units in Grammar as Science and I found it frustrating and misleading. The material made no sense to me at first, so I went back and read about 20 pages in the textbook from my Intro to Linguistics course, An Introduction to Language, which explained a lot of the material in a clear, straightforward way that I understood in one night, though it contradicted the material from Grammar as Science, which eventually contradicts itself in the final chapters. I am not familiar with any other beginning syntax textbooks, but I'm assuming there's a better one than Grammar as Science.

The text is structured in such a way that is intended to make it easier, by simplifying many aspects of grammar, introducing them in one way at the beginning, and then eventually showing you how it's actually done. The simplified explanations are wrong, but presented at first as if they were right. This was really confusing for me. I wasted a lot of time trying to figure out why it didn't make sense, when really I should have just read ahead to discover that it didn't make sense because it was wrong. I can't speak for everyone, but I would have found it much easier and less stressful to be taught the unsimplified version from the start. Even if it's more complicated, that doesn't mean it's more difficult to understand.

I also found the style off-putting. There are cartoons with speech bubbles that contain text that doesn't make sense as dialogue. The Intro is an elaborate metaphor relating the study of syntax to an adventure, complete with a cartoon of Noam Chomsky wearing a safari hat. I found it pointless and patronizing, and it's a good example of the tortuous style that dominates throughout the book.

If they wanted to present syntax as a children's story, they shouldn't have used the word 'science' in the title. If the author respected his audience as scientists (or students of science), he wouldn't have introduced the subject matter with asinine metaphors and fallacious explanations of the core concepts. You won't find that in any decent Math or Biology textbook. Maybe they should have called this "The Evolution of Syntax Theory, Presented as We Expect it Would Develop in the Mind of a Novice": it becomes more accurate the more you read, making revisions and corrections and ending up with modern syntax theory. Modern syntax theory is what I expected to learn when I registered for the class and bought the textbook. I did so, eventually, in spite of Grammar as Science.

They should have just started out with the modern version, and then they could make actual revisions to the textbook content as syntax theory continues to develop, like they do for other science textbooks. You won't find a Bio textbook that starts out with "The human body is made up of four substances, called humors: blood, phlegm, black bile and yellow bile. The bodily humors must be in perfect balance to maintain health." and then, four chapters later, "Remember the thing about the humors? That's completely wrong." No. That's just not how you teach science.

I gave it two stars instead of one because I didn't notice any typographical errors, and the true theory behind semantics is eventually explained at the end -- although I almost didn't make it there because I was so confused and frustrated that I almost dropped the class. I also talked to a few classmates who liked the textbook, for whatever reason.
Gogul
Book came in good quality. Content itself somewhat opaque-- not my favorite syntax textbook.
Shliffiana
It is an introduction to syntax textbook especially perfect for undergrads. It is illustrated throughout the book. The chapters are short and clear-cut. I would recommend it to students who are new to the field of syntax. Although I have only read a few chapters so far so good!

Here is what I think after I have studied the rest of the book: The book is not only good for undergrads but also for grads, I might say, who are new to the field. I also forgot to mention that there are exercises for you to practice what you've done that far. Most of the exercises were not written for the sake of adding an exercises section because I found most of them pretty good. After you read several chapters, you do not get bored with it or get tired even if you are new to the topic. I do not know what makes this impression, it may be the illustrations or the layout, or the language used, or it may be a combination of all. Other than that, if you are not new to syntax, you may find the book very slow-paced. Otherwise, it is great!
Kata
Overall, I like the structure and content of this book a lot, often looking back and thinking about it. I agree with other reviewers that it may not be the best book explicitly about syntax, but as an introduction, I enjoyed it, accompanied by the instruction of my professor.
ALAN
This book is rather frustrating I you have some knowledge of syntax, since it essentially tells you how to do things "wrong" before doing them right. However, for a true beginner it may be useful since it doesn't use highly complex terminology too quickly.