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Free eBook A Guide to Integral Psychotherapy: Complexity, Integration, and Spirituality in Practice (SUNY series in Integral Theory) download

by Mark D. Forman

Free eBook A Guide to Integral Psychotherapy: Complexity, Integration, and Spirituality in Practice (SUNY series in Integral Theory) download ISBN: 1438430248
Author: Mark D. Forman
Publisher: SUNY Press (March 30, 2010)
Language: English
Pages: 340
Category: Medicine
Subcategory: Psychology
Size MP3: 1356 mb
Size FLAC: 1818 mb
Rating: 4.4
Format: lit mbr azw lrf


This book provides a practical introduction to Integral Psychotherapy, which positions itself as the most comprehensive approach to psychotherapy yet offered

This book provides a practical introduction to Integral Psychotherapy, which positions itself as the most comprehensive approach to psychotherapy yet offered. Grounded in the work of theoretical psychologist and philosopher Ken Wilber, it organizes the key insights and interventions of pharmacological, psychodynamic, behavioral, cognitive, humanistic, existential, feminist, multicultural, somatic, and transpersonal approaches to psychotherapy.

Integral Theory offers a remarkably comprehensive conceptual framework, and this book offers a view of psychotherapy .

Integral Theory offers a remarkably comprehensive conceptual framework, and this book offers a view of psychotherapy through its encompassing lens. - -Roger Walsh, MD, author of Essential Spirituality: The Seven Central Practices to Awaken Heart and Mind. Highly recommended for any mental health professional

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Guide to Integral Psychotherapy book. Published April 8th 2010 by State University Press of New York (Suny) (first published April 1st 2010). Guide to Integral Psychotherapy: Complexity, Integration, and Spirituality in Practice. This book provides a practical introduction to Integral Psychotherapy, which positions itself as the most comprehensive approach to psychotherapy yet offered.

This book provides a practical introduction to Integral Psychotherapy, which positions itself as the most comprehensive approach to psychotherapy yet offered.

Mark D. Forman1 February 2012. Forman is the cofounder of the Integral Theory Conference, the first academic conference devoted to the field of Integral Theory and its application

Mark D. Integral Psychotherapy does not attempt to unify these diverse models, but rather takes a metatheoretical perspective, giving general guidelines for which is most appropriate in a wide range of clinical situations. Forman is the cofounder of the Integral Theory Conference, the first academic conference devoted to the field of Integral Theory and its application. He is in private practice in California. Grounded in the work of theoretical psychologist and philosopher Ken Wilber, it organizes the key insights and interventions of pharmacological, psychodynamic, behavioral, cognitive, humanistic, existential, feminist, multicultural, somatic, and transpersonal approaches to psychotherapy

Journal of Integral Theory and Practice. What sets this book apart from others. Mark D. Forman is a clinical psychologist who has worked in a variety of settings, including the Salvation Army’s Adult Substance Rehabilitation Program, Kaiser.

Journal of Integral Theory and Practice. is that Forman cites a wide range of sources whose work, while not necessarily part of the integral model, supports elements of the model that have not otherwise been included in other integral psychology books. - Integral Options Cafe. Forman is a clinical psychologist who has worked in a variety of settings, including the Salvation Army’s Adult Substance Rehabilitation Program, Kaiser Permanente’s Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, and San José State University’s Student Counseling Center.

Integral theory is a meta-theory that recognizes that reality can be organized from four major perspectives: subjective, intersubjective . A Guide to Integral Psychotherapy: Complexity, Integration, and Spirituality in Practice. Albany, NY: SUNY Press. Frank, J. D. & Frank, J. B. (1991).

Integral theory is a meta-theory that recognizes that reality can be organized from four major perspectives: subjective, intersubjective, objective, and interobjective. Integral psychotherapy includes all four. Persuasion and Healing: A Comparative Study of Psychotherapy (3rd e.

This book provides a practical introduction t. .This book provides a practical introduction to Integral Psychotherapy, which positions itself as the most comprehensive approach to psychotherapy yet offered ehavioral, cognitive, humanistic, existential, feminist, multicultural, somatic, and transpersonal approaches to psychotherapy.

A therapist's guide to psychotherapy, spirituality, and self-development.
User reviews
Hamrl
Even though written for therapists, it is a profound and concise introduction to Integral Philosophy and to knowing ourselves, including various forms of our unconscious. It provides a clear path to healing psychological wounds, growing-up (maturing), and spiritually waking-up. Essential for every therapist and serious coach, as well as lay people interested in healing and personal growth.
Runehammer
Excellent modern guide within Integral Theory in healing and counseling practice. Offers a way to hold clients in a more holistic and total way — honoring the different psychological paradigms — behavioral, cognitive, interpersonal, and transpersonal.
Voodoosida
This book is a crucial additional to Wilber's Integral Psychology. Many of us go through Integral Psychology reading about fulcrums and why some therapies work better at some levels but end up asking, "where can I find out more about all this?" If Integral Psychology is the skeleton for how Integral Theory can be applied to therapy, this book is the meat. It will take you through each of the levels of consciousness that a presenting client might come to your practice in and how you can match your own approaches to meet their needs at those levels. It is informative and appears to avoid trying to present too many assumptions or pretenses that some developmental books can have -it isn't written with the intent of convincing you of anything; it's didactic. It's well sourced and references many aspects of Integral Theory from a third person perspective that a conventional Ken Wilber reader might not have experienced before as Wilber often takes an authorship tone in his works. The theories laid out in the book will not provide you with a cookie-cutter approach to therapy, rather, it will help you to make a more informed approach toward helping clients by helping the reader to define developmental contexts within the reference points of an integrally informed therapist. It does contain some nuggets regarding spiritual development as well that can be helpful. These are structured well within the integral model and ARE NOT mythical or religious in connotation so you don't have to worry about that. It also addresses the controversial issue of whether a therapist at one level of development can counsel a client at a higher level of development, but I won't spoil it here for you. It's worth the read all the way through, though personally, I will be using the book as a referencing tool throughout my own practice as it can be difficult to soak in every level of development and their various minutiae. Highly recommended!
TheMoonix
I've been coming back to this again and again and finding it more and more useful. A thorough grounding in an incredibly rich theory.
generation of new
This is a good book that introduces the notion of Integral Psychotherapy. It is aimed at professionals in the field (psychologists, clinical psychologists, psychotherapists, counsellors, etc.). I’d argue that learning about the notion of Integral Psychotherapy could be generally useful to anyone who works in the spheres related to communication with people.

The book provides a sound theoretical overview of the multidimensional field of Integral Psychotherapy, and offers useful practical hints for specialists, especially in terms of developmental stages and stage-specific treatments and interventions. I think this book can serve well as an introductory textbook for general psychologists and psychotherapists.

One strong part of this approach is its understanding of experiential spiritual and religious realities and their importance in therapy process and self-growth. Integral Psychotherapy by definition integrates both conventional psychological approaches (including modern cognitive and behavioral approaches, as well as psychodynamic, humanistic, and existential therapies) and non-conventional transpersonal approaches (which involve practical awareness of such phenomena as peak experiences, altered states of consciusness, and the maturest stages of adult development). These are very inspiring resources for psychological and spiritual work.

I found the parts of the book that offer descriptions of stages of child and adult development in relation to psychotherapy process with clients to be very practically useful to me and most interesting. The part I found least valuable for me personally was the part on diversity (probably, because it seems to be grounded in primarily US-specific discourse which is not yet relevant to the culture where I live); still, theoretically this part on diversity could probably be useful to American practitioners.

The concluding parts of the book stress the importance of psychotherapists’ own self-growth and development. This is a sentiment I strongly support and it’s a defining feature of the general imperative of Integral Theory and Practice: it is never about monologically approaching the world, it is about dialectical unity with it in one’s activities. Indeed, at some point, especially as one reaches self-actualization and, later, self-transcendence needs, the notion of transformations of consciousness becomes extremely relevant.

One of the possible—and understandable—downsides of the book, at least as far as my impression goes, is that it focuses mainly on the lens of individual counseling, while not offering much as regards to group therapy (there is only one brief section). It would be great to see works on Integral group therapy emerge.

It also should be noted that the book itself is a scholarly-thorough theoretical literature review—which is a very difficult, valuable, and important work to do. More work like this needs to be done. As such, it contains few gems of the author’s own personal phenomenological and practical insights—so it is not a paradigm-breaker in terms of offering an array of completely new data and insights (although it does contain valuable perspectives on how to apply various methodologies with particular and specific cases).

We need more books like this, definitely, and also other kinds of treatises on Integral Psychotherapy which offer unique approaches towards this emerging metaparadigm of psychotherapeutic theory and practice. So, good job, definitely recommend as a reading in psychology and psychotherapy. It is specifically crafted for modern and postmodern professionals who want a 21st-century worldcentric and transcultural way to approach psychotherapy, an important contribution to the field.