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Free eBook 28: Stories of AIDS in Africa download

by Stephanie Nolen

Free eBook 28: Stories of AIDS in Africa download ISBN: 080271675X
Author: Stephanie Nolen
Publisher: Bloomsbury USA; First Edition edition (June 2, 2008)
Language: English
Pages: 384
Category: Medicine
Subcategory: Medicine
Size MP3: 1716 mb
Size FLAC: 1187 mb
Rating: 4.8
Format: mbr lit doc lrf


Nolen puts a very human face on HIV/AIDS in Africa, verbally and visually. A photograph accompanies each of the book's 28 personal histories (one subject stands for one million infected people in sub-Saharan Africa).

Nolen puts a very human face on HIV/AIDS in Africa, verbally and visually. The faces in the photos appear no different than faces of everyday Americans, but that appearance belies the horrific reality of lives shredded by devastating disease.

28: Stories of AIDS in Africa is a 2007 non-fiction book by Canadian author Stephanie Nolen, Africa correspondent for The Globe and Mail. The book profiles 28 Africans who have HIV/AIDS, or have otherwise been affected by it. The number 28 was chosen to reflect the 28 million Africans who had HIV in 2007, according to UNAIDS. Nolen spent six years traveling through Africa to gather the stories.

For the past six years, Stephanie Nolen has traced AIDS across Africa, and 28 is the result: an unprecedented, uniquely human .

For the past six years, Stephanie Nolen has traced AIDS across Africa, and 28 is the result: an unprecedented, uniquely human portrait of the continent in crisis. Through riveting, anecdotal stories, she brings to life men, women, and children involved in every AIDS arena, making them familiar. And she explores the effects of an epidemic that well exceeds the Black Plague in scope, and the reasons why we must care about what happens.

In 28, Stephanie Nolen, the Globe and Mail’s Africa Bureau Chief, puts a human face to the crisis created by HIV-AIDS in Africa

In 28, Stephanie Nolen, the Globe and Mail’s Africa Bureau Chief, puts a human face to the crisis created by HIV-AIDS in Africa. She has achieved, in this amazing book, something extraordinary: she writes with a power, understanding and simplicity that makes us listen, makes us understand and care. Through riveting anecdotal stories – one for each of the million people living with HIV-AIDS in Africa – Nolen explores the effects of an epidemic that well exceeds the Black Plague in magnitude

National Magazine Award winner, a 4-time Amnesty International Media Award winner, and received the PEN "Courage" Prize for her book 28 Stories of AIDS in Africa. She lives in Rio de Janeiro.

Award-winning foreign correspondent for Canada's Globe and Mail. National Magazine Award winner, a 4-time Amnesty International Media Award winner, and received the PEN "Courage" Prize for her book 28 Stories of AIDS in Africa. Previously she was a foreign correspondent in Africa, South Asia and the Middle East.

Stephanie Nolen is an award-winning Canadian journalist who has lived in Africa for six years. The way Aids was ravaging the continent became clear to her while she was covering the crises in Uganda and Sudan and the aftermath of conflict in Sierra Leone and Rwanda. Her work in those areas brought her into contact with agencies such as Medecins Sans Frontieres - one of the few organisations trying to bring antiretroviral drugs and other treatments to HIV/Aids sufferers. In the developed world, pregnant women carrying the virus are given a simple treatment in labour, along with their baby, and.

The disease's effect on everyday people is the subject of Stephanie Nolen's book, 28 Stories of AIDS in Africa, a group of profiles written by the reporter for Toronto's Globe and Mail newspaper. The pandemic has all but disappeared from today's media. One reason seems to be the so-called "AIDS fatigue" - simply put, Americans are tired of reading about the disease. His health minister, Manto Tshabalala-Msimang, has promoted a diet rich in vegetables as a traditional cure for the virus.

Stephanie Nolen (born September 3, 1971 in Montreal, Quebec) is a Canadian journalist and writer. Her book on Africa's AIDS pandemic, 28: Stories of AIDS in Africa, was nominated for the 2007 Governor General's Literary Award and has been published in 15 countries. She is currently the Latin America bureau chief for The Globe and Mail. From 2008 to 2013, she was the Globe's South Asia Bureau Chief, based in New Delhi. From 2003 to 2008, she was the Globe's Africa bureau chief, and she has reported from more than 60 countries around the world. She is the co-founder of the Museum of AIDS in Africa. She currently lives in Mexico City.

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In 28, Stephanie Nolen, the Toronto Globe and Mail's Africa Bureau Chief, puts a human face on the crisis created by HIV/AIDS in Africa. Through riveting anecdotal stories, Nolen brings to life people involved in every aspect of the crisis and explores the effects of an epidemic that well exceeds the Black Plague in magnitude, a calamity ongoing just a 747-flight away. 28's stories are much more than a record of suffering and loss. Through her unprecedented reporting, Nolen introduces women, men, and children fighting vigorously and hopefully on the frontlines of disease: Tigist Haile Michael, a smart, shy 14-year-old Ethiopian orphan fending for herself and her baby brother on the slum streets of Addis Ababa; Alice Kadzanja, an HIV-positive nurse in Malawi, where one in six adults has the virus, and where the average adult's life expectancy is 36; Zachie Achmat, the hero of South Africa's politically fragmented battle against HIV/AIDS. Nolen's stories reveal how the disease works, how it spreads, and how it kills; how it is inextricably tied to conflict, famine, failure of leadership, and the collapse of states, and to the cultures it has ravaged; how treatment works, and how people who can't get it fight to stay alive with courage, dignity, and hope against huge odds. Writing with power, understanding, and simplicity, Stephanie Nolen makes us listen, allows us to understand, and inspires us to care. Timely, transformative, and thoroughly accessible, 28 is essential reading for our times.

User reviews
Tar
It sounds weird to say it, but I couldn't put this book down. All the stories are so compelling and so well-written. Nolen doesn't tell one story over and over, but tells many stories using very diverse people. Her courage is obvious: she hung out with a long-haul trucker, a sex worker, and people with AIDS who had only days left to live. I was especially intrigued by the stories of the infected ones who became powerful advocates. What this book left me with wasn't the sense that "these people are pathetic victims we richer folk need to help," but that these are resilient, strong, interesting human beings suffering a horrid situation with little or no resources, and we should help them help themselves. As a journalist, I'm in awe of Stephanie Nolen in every respect. As a reader, I'm compelled to respond. I highly recommend the related website, [...], where you can read about each of the 28 briefly, and see a video interview of several. The website and book both give many ideas for how you can help. Start by reading a book that could change your life.
Roru
I haven't read this book yet, it arrived today, but, I am aware of the epidemic of HIV in Africa, it's not 28, it's over 28 million, I buy hand crafted jewelry made by HIV + women in Africa, it's beautiful , inexpensive and I git it when ever I can.
Hono
I bought this book after hearing an interview with the author on NPR. Then it rested on a pile of books to read for over a year. It didn't seem like the type of book you want to take to the beach or vacation. Or a book to read and put yourself to sleep at night. Then I started to read it one day after hearing of relief work in Africa from a friend. I read several of the profiles/stories. I kept thinking, ok, she has put the most dramatic ones in the front of the book. They can't be that much different after a few. And I was proven wrong. Every story was unique. They are unique from so many different perspectives. Yet they all have the common theme and sensitivity brought to the reader by a very skilled and aware reporter. Nolen doesn't just drop in on someone and do a quick interview. She wraps many dimensions around each story--human, family, love, economic, political, education and so much more. I encourage interested readers to look at the other reviews. Then buy the book. But don't wait to read it.
Freighton
I have spent somewhat extensive time in both East and West Africa and I feel that this book not only portrays the way AIDs is stigmatized but also how little some groups actually understand AIDs. After reading 28, I have a changed perspective on AIDs around the world both through how I act when I am abroad and how I talk to people in the US about it.
ME
interesting but out of date
mIni-Like
Nice montage of stories. Being from South Africa, I was hoping for more local stories--I just read the ones from RSA first and then picked and chose the others.
Goltizuru
I read this book in preparation for a mission trip to South Africa to work with Aids orphans. The book did a great job of telling the stories of various victims of Aids without judging or exonerating. My eyes were opened to the magnitude of suffering and gave me a better understanding of the individual and societal problems that we may encounter.
Very eye opening to the struggles women face because of HIV/AIDS