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Free eBook Something for the Pain, One Doctor's Account of Life and Death in the ER download

by Paul Austin

Free eBook Something for the Pain, One Doctor's Account of Life and Death in the ER download ISBN: 1607517841
Author: Paul Austin
Publisher: W.W. Norton & Co. Ltd.; 1st edition (2008)
Language: English
Pages: 297
Category: Medicine
Subcategory: Medicine
Size MP3: 1622 mb
Size FLAC: 1914 mb
Rating: 4.7
Format: azw lrf lit txt


In this riveting memoir, an ER doctor reveals how his high-stress career of helping others led to a struggle to. .

In this riveting memoir, an ER doctor reveals how his high-stress career of helping others led to a struggle to save himself. It turns out there are all kinds of things about working in an ER that most of us haven't learned from TV or having sat in one. In Something for the Pain. This is a combination personal narrative of the life of author Paul Austin and a behind-the-scenes look at a busy ER. Either one would have been enough for a fascinating book, but somehow combining the two diluted the power of each. A college dropout who went on to become a carpenter and firefighter before returning to school and eventually becoming a doctor, Austen is also a good writer.

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Paul Austin, an emergency-room doctor, is the author of two memoirs: Something for the Pain and Beautiful Eyes. He lives in Durham, North Carolina. Zasady dotyczące zamieszczania opinii. Библиографические данные.

Something for the Pain : Compassion and Burnout in the E.

Something for the Pain : Compassion and Burnout in the ER. by Paul Austin.

Early life and military career of John McCain - The early life and military career of John Sidney McCain III spans forty five years (1936 ndash;1981). McCain s father and grandfather were admirals in the United States Navy. death - /deth/, n. 1. the act of dying; the end of life; the total and permanent cessation of all the vital functions of an organism. 2. an instance of this: a death in the family; letters published after his death. 3. the state of bein. niversalium.

His own life becomes Exhibit A, as he details the emotional detachment that estranges him from himself and his family.

Something for the pain. Austin pursued a roundabout path to a medical degree and emergency medicine

Something for the pain. Austin pursued a roundabout path to a medical degree and emergency medicine. After dropping out of college to spend nine years as a full-time firefighter and a part-time carpenter, he returned to college at age 27. Enrolled at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, he took a job as a nursing assistant in the ER at North Carolina Memorial Hospital, which introduced him to his chosen field. He vividly tells all the usual stories of ER crises: men and women with heart attacks or strokes, gunshot and accident victims, violent, vomiting drunks. Tool bag. Night shift. Something so personal. Published 2008 by . Norton & Co. in New York.

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User reviews
tamada
Paul Austin is a good writer whose writing style really kept my interest. There were incredibly interesting stories of cases he saw in the Emergency Room; however, some of the stories of his home life dragged and felt out of place (I even found myself skipping pages about his building a garage). By the end of the book, I understood the frustrations of making life and death decisions on a daily basis as well as the added challenge of working shifts while making those decisions. The details given brought the stories to life and engaged my emotions. I was disappointed that Dr. Austin felt it necessary to mention his view on a certain political party (it was very brief) and his mentioning often and in detail how much he suffered over bad outcomes at work, even detailing his trips to his pastor for counseling. Other than that, it was very interesting.
Iaiastta
This is a combination personal narrative of the life of author Paul Austin and a behind-the-scenes look at a busy ER. Either one would have been enough for a fascinating book, but somehow combining the two diluted the power of each. A college dropout who went on to become a carpenter and firefighter before returning to school and eventually becoming a doctor, Austen is also a good writer. I found myself intrigued by all the facets of his life and just wished the narrative of his life had gone into greater depth. I felt the same way about his presentation of tales in the ER. Every time he got into a compelling story, his shift was over and he was heading home. Frankly he spent more time complaining about his lack of sleep and searching for the perfect bedtime routine than he did on any medical drama.
Winawel
Dr. Austin recounts his pre-doctor days as a firefighter, his inspiring and unexpected decision to try to get into medical school, a failed relationship and then meeting someone new, his family troubles and disappointments, his feelings about working in a hospital for the first time, the struggles of shift work, drunk patients who try his patience. Austin is honest and human. Reading this book was like speaking with a friend every day and over time learning their story.
Ariurin
This book opened a window into the lives of the caring doctor's who sacrifice much to care for their patients. The issue of burn out is honestly discussed, as well as how doctor's create an invisible wall between themselves and patients. We've all felt it, and haven't always liked it. However, I learned that the wall doesn't mean my doctor doesn't care. It means that he or she sees so much suffering and pain, that this wall is necessary to protect his or her emotional well being.
Further explored is the toll that being a doctor takes on his or her family. They miss birthdays, school programs their children participate in. They are sometimes so mentally drained, they have little time to devote to their marriages.
The medical stories were interesting, as well as how this doctor reacted to them.
Most importantly, the humanity of the author was so clearly revealed.
I don't feel the same about my doctors after reading this book. I will remember to treat them with the same respect I appreciate receiving as a human being.
I highly recommend this book to anyone, especially someone who has ever felt rushed or felt that their doctor has acted robotic toward them.
Vathennece
I thoroughly enjoyed reading this book. I worked trauma mostly on night shifts at different hospitals for a decade...and had a nervous breakdown and a few near misses from my experiences, along the way. It was brutal, full of both pain and hope, and incredibly enriching. I learned so much about people, life, and myself. Austin doesn't have all the answers, and I didn't expect him to. But he has both my respect and gratitude for his honesty, thoughts, and efforts. They are solid.
NiceOne
A great read I could not put it down. Made me think about how much we rely on our drs to make the right choices and make it all go away. Some times we need to remember we need to help them help us and remember to tell thank you great job even when we think they are wrong.
Conjukus
I am an ER nurse/EMT/Firefighter and this was a refreshing written view of emergency medicine. Many books out there focus on the hardest parts of the job; death/mortality, pain, fear, THOSE patients, and much more.

This book portrayed a welcome optimism that I found myself smiling at as I finished the last page. It addressed the challenges, but handled them in a way that reminded me as to why I do what I do. It wasn't selfish either, the author examined more than just his perspective, it considered the patient's as well.

If you are a veteran to the field, I highly recommend it. If you are new to the field, put it on the bookshelf and pull it out when you find yourself wondering why you chose emergency medicine.
Truly a page-turner...I easily could read this at 2X the length. Not only are the accounts riveting and insightful, it’s such a relief to buy a book that’s not riddled with spelling and grammatical errors. All around five stars!