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Free eBook Blood Matters: From Inherited Illness to Designer Babies, How the World and I Found Ourselves in the Future of the Gene download

by Masha Gessen

Free eBook Blood Matters: From Inherited Illness to Designer Babies, How the World and I Found Ourselves in the Future of the Gene download ISBN: 0151013624
Author: Masha Gessen
Publisher: Harcourt; 1 edition (April 1, 2008)
Language: English
Pages: 336
Category: Medicine
Subcategory: Medicine
Size MP3: 1504 mb
Size FLAC: 1356 mb
Rating: 4.1
Format: mobi docx lit lrf


America is most fortunate to have gained Ms Gessen family story from the wreck of the Nazi and Communist collision in the 20th century

America is most fortunate to have gained Ms Gessen family story from the wreck of the Nazi and Communist collision in the 20th century. This book explains cancer occurring in families in a way that non-medical readers can understand.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. Masha Gessen discovered through genetic testing that she had the dreaded BRCA1 genetic mutation-the same mutation made famous recently by Angelina Jolie.

Автор: Gessen Masha Название: Blood Matters: From Inherited Illness to. .At war's end, both women found themselves in Moscow, where informers lurked on every corner and anti-Semitism reigned.

Blood Matters is a much-needed field guide to this unfamiliar and unsettling territory.

Designer babies: Scientists say that, with gene therapy, they may soon be able to cure a child's inherited disease before he is even born. Related Items in Google Scholar.

Masha Gessen discovered through genetic testing that she had the dreaded BRCA1 genetic mutation-the same mutation made famous recently by Angelina Jolie, which predisposes women to ovarian and breast cancer

Masha Gessen discovered through genetic testing that she had the dreaded BRCA1 genetic mutation-the same mutation made famous recently by Angelina Jolie, which predisposes women to ovarian and breast cancer. Blood Matters is a much-needed field guide to this unfamiliar and unsettling territory.

Masha Gessen was faced with a terrifying choice: cut off her breasts, and possibly save herself from cancer, or.

Masha Gessen was faced with a terrifying choice: cut off her breasts, and possibly save herself from cancer, or use them to feed her child. It was late at night when I walked back to my empty dorm room at the conference. Too cold to sleep, I picked up my copy of Masha Gessen's "Blood Matters: From Inherited Illness to Designer Babies, How the World and I Found Ourselves in the Future of the Gene," expecting boredom to lull me into unconsiousness. An hour later, I was still reading, riveted by Gessen's struggle and fascinated by the stories she described. The topic is science, but this book reads like a novel.

Blood Matters: From Inherited Illness to Designer Babies, How the World and I Found Ourselves in the Future of the Gene. Perfect Rigor: A Genius and the Mathematical Breakthrough of the Century. The Man Without a Face: The Unlikely Rise of Vladimir Putin. Contents ← PRAISE FOR. Remarkabl. eminiscent of Lawrence Wright’s The Looming Towe. ather than the story of two lone-wolf jihadists, determined to wage war on their adopted country, the marathon bombing becomes a saga of both the Tsarnaev family and contemporary . culture, in which all too often terror provokes an unreasonable response.

In 2004 genetic testing revealed that Masha Gessen had a mutation that predisposed her to ovarian and breast cancer. The discovery initiated Gessen into a club of sorts: the small (but exponentially expanding) group of people in possession of a new and different way of knowing themselves through what is inscribed in the strands of their DNA. As she wrestled with a wrenching personal decision—what to do with such knowledge—Gessen explored the landscape of this brave new world, speaking with others like her and with experts including medical researchers, historians, and religious thinkers. Blood Matters is a much-needed field guide to this unfamiliar and unsettling territory. It explores the way genetic information is shaping the decisions we make, not only about our physical and emotional health but about whom we marry, the children we bear, even the personality traits we long to have. And it helps us come to terms with the radical transformation that genetic information is engineering in our most basic sense of who we are and what we might become.
User reviews
POFOD
I took to Masha Gessen's writing immediately. Smart and inquisitive, she asks interesting questions and she displays both genuineness and insight over the course of her journey to make and justify her decision to undergo prophylactic mastectomies. She reveals moments when her professional facade breaks down and she finds herself reduced to a scared woman hoping the experts she consults can give her the wisdom she seeks. All through her story, however, she maintains an honesty and human sense of connection that makes this book an engaging read. Her search through the medical system, through economics (as the science of decision-making), through psychology and aesthetics, and through applied genetics makes fascinating reading. Anyone interested in locating the right questions to ask about genetic science and in considering the opinions of some of today's leading-edge thinkers and practitioners in this area will enjoy this book.
Uaha
I recommend all of Ms Gessen's work. America is most fortunate to have gained Ms Gessen family story from the wreck of the Nazi and Communist collision in the 20th century. This book explains cancer occurring in families in a way that non-medical readers can understand.
Darkshaper
I read this book at the request of a friend. Found it to be very informative about the current state of applied human genetics and the potential it holds for both good and abuse. It raised awareness about the difficult ethical decisions that face us now, let alone what the future will require. I read this on my Kindle and was bothered throughout by the apparent lack of any documentation (footnotes) until I reached the end and found her extensive annotated bibliography. Against the backdrop of her own personal life experience with breast cancer, the author is able to bring together an impressive body of genetic research and make it relevant to men and women alike.
Perdana
Masha Gessen is a journalist of Ashkenazi jewish ancestry with a BRCA gene mutation that meant she watched her mother die of cancer and her statistical probability of getting ovarian or breast cancer was quite high. So she investigated the ways different populations with high hereditary instances of certain diseases deal with trying to control the diseases but still remain on an ethical/moral straight path.

The book takes a look not only at BRCA gene counseling in the U.S., but also a company that Hasidic Jews send potential marriage mate blood samples to in order to find out if recessive diseases like Tay-Sachs are a possibility, populations in the U.S. with high instances of the dominant, degenerative Huntington's disease, and also Amish and Old Order Mennonite populations whose babies die young from Maple Syrup Disease (and enzyme issue), amongst others.

All the way through, Gessen provides a singular, embedded viewpoint filtering what she learns through her how journey of deciding how to handle the news of her own BRCA mutation. Should she do preventive surgery? Vigilant maintenance? What did this mean for the rest of her family?

At time, Gessen writes things from a viewpoint that I didn't agree with. Sometimes they were health related things not really connected to her main questions about genetics, like in her quick survey of the history of eugenics in the U.S.:
"Cigarettes, doctors reluctantly will tell you, are dangerous only when consumed in large doses: Very light smokers can have the pleasure without the risk of lung cancer."

Sometimes its her wry voice coming through in the way she calls herself a mutant (because of the BRCA) throughout the book that seems a tad too self-servingly deprecating.

And sometimes she is waxes poetically eloquent, like here when she is talking about Dor Yeshorim's testing of potential marriage mates:
"God provides the spirit, the soul, the beauty of features, the sight of the eyes...One might conclude that where a child is deprived of sight, hearing, speech, movement, understanding, and discernment-- as children with Tay-Sachs, Canavan, and Niemann-Pick certainly are-- God had declined to do His part. Dor Yeshorim's testing provides a peek to which couples will have these God-forsaken children."

I won't spoil the book by telling you what she decides to do in response to her own BRCA mutation. That is a journey worth taking with her through this book, finding out what she finds out, mulling over possibilities and consequences with her.

And with stem-cell debate and religion mixed up in genetics in the U.S., it's well worth reading and realizing about what individuals such as the doctor in the book ministering to the Old Order Mennonites in Pennsylvania and small organizations like Dor Yeshorim are doing already in influencing human genetics.