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Free eBook Psychosocial Perspectives on Aids: Etiology, Prevention and Treatment (Perspectives in Behavioral Medicine) download

by Lydia Temoshok,Andrew S. Baum

Free eBook Psychosocial Perspectives on Aids: Etiology, Prevention and Treatment (Perspectives in Behavioral Medicine) download ISBN: 080580207X
Author: Lydia Temoshok,Andrew S. Baum
Publisher: Psychology Press; 1 edition (March 1, 1990)
Language: English
Pages: 352
Category: Medicine
Subcategory: Medicine
Size MP3: 1470 mb
Size FLAC: 1769 mb
Rating: 4.8
Format: rtf doc lrf mbr


Etiology, Prevention and Treatment.

Etiology, Prevention and Treatment.

Lydia Temoshok Andrew S. Baum,13 maja 2013. AIDS and the virus that causes it have challenged the world's scientists, health care systems, and public health policies as much or more than any medical problem in recorded history. Perhaps this is so because this particular infirmity constitutes more than a merely medical problem: it is enmeshed in psychological, social, cultural, political, and economic contexts.

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Psychosocial Perspectives on AIDS : Etiology, Prevention and Treatment.

Save up to 80% by choosing the eTextbook option for ISBN: 9781134740819, 1134740816. The print version of this textbook is ISBN: 9781138984189, 1138984183. Built-in study tools like highlights and more. Listen and follow along as Bookshelf reads to you.

Baum A, Temoshok L (1990) Psychosocial aspects of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. In: Temoshok L, Baum A (eds) Psychosocial perspectives on AIDS: etiology, prevention, and treatment. Laurence Erlbaum, New JerseyGoogle Scholar. Bluebond Langer M (1978) The private worlds of dying children. Cite this chapter as: Harris . Wanigaratne S. (1996) Counselling and Clinical Psychology in HIV Infection and AIDS. In: Millar A. (eds) Medical Management of HIV and AIDS.

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Integration of innovative social and behavioral science with public health approaches for HIV prevention and treatment is of critical importance for slowing the global HIV epidemic. originated in 2006, involves twenty NIH-funded CFAR Centers and is responding to this challenge.

Marvin Stein, Andrew S. Baum,, Andrew S. Baum

Marvin Stein, Andrew S. Baum.

AIDS and the virus that causes it have challenged the world's scientists, health care systems, and public health policies as much or more than any medical problem in recorded history. Perhaps this is so because this particular infirmity constitutes more than a merely medical problem: it is enmeshed in psychological, social, cultural, political, and economic contexts. This book examines the need for pragmatic and research-based suggestions on how to address some important problems related to these contexts. Although much basic research in virology and immunology can be accomplished within the biomedical domain, biobehavioral disciplines such as behavioral medicine offer more opportunities for the comprehensive approach necessary to confront the AIDS/HIV problem. The editors of this groundbreaking volume suggest that the very nature of this constantly evolving problem encourages an approach to research and intervention/prevention efforts that emphasizes flexibility of response to changing knowledge, patterns of the pandemic, new treatments, and shifts in public opinion and behavior. A major triumph in dealing with this phenomenon would include a bridging of the gap between research and applied efforts, which has been the largest obstacle for progress to date. In this book, such previously uncharted territory is explored, opening a host of new possibilities for dealing with the very real threat of AIDS.