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Free eBook Relativity: The Special and General Theory (Large Print Edition) download

by Albert Einstein

Free eBook Relativity: The Special and General Theory (Large Print Edition) download ISBN: 0554276291
Author: Albert Einstein
Publisher: BiblioLife; Large type / large print edition edition (August 18, 2008)
Language: English
Pages: 144
Category: Math Science
Subcategory: Physics
Size MP3: 1224 mb
Size FLAC: 1194 mb
Rating: 4.1
Format: azw rtf txt lrf


Einstein’s monograph on the theory of relativity is simply brilliant, of course, and I wouldn’t presume to critique his work.

Other than that, there is nothing anywhere in the book that identifies the publisher. Einstein’s monograph on the theory of relativity is simply brilliant, of course, and I wouldn’t presume to critique his work.

In 1917, Einstein applied the general theory of relativity to model the large-scale . Figures are cut out of this printing entirely. The best book ever written on Einstein's Relativity.

In 1917, Einstein applied the general theory of relativity to model the large-scale structure of the universe. He was visiting the United States when Adolf Hitler came to power in 1933 and did not go back to Germany, where he had been a professor at the Berlin Academy of Sciences. He settled in the . becoming an American citizen in 1940. Figures are cut out of this printing entirely all that the text shows is the placeholders: "Fig. Einstein is very clear and a great read for junior high school and above.

TITLE: Relativity: The special and general theory, by Albert Einstein. 1920, Translated by Robert W. Lawson. Part 1 - The Special Theory. IN your schooldays most of you who read this book made acquaintance with the noble building of Euclid’s geometry, and you remember-perhaps with more respect than love-the magnificent structure, on the lofty staircase of which you were chased about for uncounted hours by conscientious teachers. By reason of your past experience, you would certainly regard every one with disdain who should pronounce even the most out-of-the-way proposition of this science to be untrue.

Einstein's explanation of the basis and origin of Special Relativity is especially intuitive and easy to follow, even with just a background of high school geometry. Einstein's explanation of the basis and origin of Special Relativity is especially intuitive and easy to follow, even with just a background of high school geometry. It is also quiet surprising to find that the derivation of E m c^2 comes from the necessity of the speed of light being constant for all reference frames in relative motion. The General Theory, however, really can't be understood apart from non-Euclidean geometry, so the explanation of it it's much harder to follow.

Special and General Principle of Relativity 1. The Special Theory of Relativity. Physical Meaning of Geometrical Propositions.

Special and General Principle of Relativity 19. The Gravitational Field 20. The Equality of Inertial and Gravitational Mass as an Argument for the General Postulate of Relativity 21. In What Respects are the Foundations of Classical Mechanics and of the Special Theory of Relativity Unsatisfactory? 22. A Few Inferences from the General Principle of Relativity 2.

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Relativity: The Special and the General Theory began as a short paper and was eventually published as a book written by Albert Einstein with the aim of giving: It was first published in German in 1916 and later translated into English in 1920

Relativity: The Special and the General Theory began as a short paper and was eventually published as a book written by Albert Einstein with the aim of giving: It was first published in German in 1916 and later translated into English in 1920. It is divided into 3 parts, the first dealing with special relativity, the second dealing with general relativity and the third dealing with considerations on the universe as a whole.

Book: Relativity: The Special and General Theory Author: Albert Einstein, 1879–1955 First published: 1920. From 1896 to 1900 Albert Einstein studied mathematics and physics at the Technical High School in Zurich, as he intended becoming a secondary school (Gymnasium) teacher. The original book is in the public domain in the United States. For some time afterwards he was a private tutor, and having meanwhile become naturalised, he obtained a post as engineer in the Swiss Patent Office in 1902, which position he occupied till 1909. The main ideas involved in the most important of Einstein’s theories date back to this period.

Einstein’s monograph on the theory of relativity is simply brilliant, of course, and I wouldn’t presume to critique his work.

Relativity: The Special and General Theory. Report an error in the book.

This is a pre-1923 historical reproduction that was curated for quality. Quality assurance was conducted on each of these books in an attempt to remove books with imperfections introduced by the digitization process. Though we have made best efforts - the books may have occasional errors that do not impede the reading experience. We believe this work is culturally important and have elected to bring the book back into print as part of our continuing commitment to the preservation of printed works worldwide.
User reviews
Madis
Caveat: I’ve noticed that Amazon book reviews seem not to be tied to a specific edition of a book; rather, the same reviews will often appear for every edition of a particular title. My complaints about this book apply only to the specific edition I got from Amazon, not to Einstein’s text in general. The edition I have lacks any publication information apart from the fact that it was printed in San Bernardino, CA, on 15 July 2014. Other than that, there is nothing anywhere in the book that identifies the publisher. The ISBN is 9781619491502, and a quick Google search reveals that the publisher is “Empire Books,” though the publisher’s name appears nowhere on or in the book itself (and frankly, I don’t blame them for not wanting to take credit for this mess). Nonetheless, it is the edition with a drawing of Einstein’s face on the cover, with the title above the drawing and the subtitle and author’s name below it.

Einstein’s monograph on the theory of relativity is simply brilliant, of course, and I wouldn’t presume to critique his work. But “Empire Books,” or whatever fly-by-night publisher was responsible for this particular edition of the book, was inexcusably negligent. The edition that I got from Amazon is simply riddled with typographical and formatting errors, which in some places are so bad that they make it difficult to follow the text. I know nothing about who is behind “Empire Books,” but I strongly suspect that some clever young entrepreneur with access to a printing press thought that an easy way to make a quick buck would be to print and sell new editions of books that were in the public domain. I have no problem with this business model in principle — I might even consider doing it myself if I owned a printing press. My complaint is with the poor quality control. If you’re going to go into the publishing business, in my opinion, you have an obligation to your customers to make sure that the books you print are properly formatted and have been proofread at least well enough to catch glaring mistakes. You can’t just download a text file from Project Gutenberg or some similar site and print it out as is, never even bothering to check it for errors. I certainly wouldn’t recommend this edition of Einstein’s excellent book to anyone. Find one from a more reliable publisher.
Nikok
This book published by Ancient Wisdom Publications (December 17, 2010), has not been proof-read by anyone with knowledge of mathematics. It is riddled with errors and typos in equations throughout the entire book such that it is useless for anyone who wishes to understand the subject. I was able to correct many of the math errors through my own derivations, but there are many more likely errors for which the context does not provide sufficient information to make corrections, so this book should not be purchased by anyone.
Umdwyn
This book is a ripoff, don't buy it! The "publisher", Methuem & Co. Ltd., downloaded some public domain copy of Einstein's early works and printed it as is, without any corrections or editing. It's an easy way to make money but of little value to the reader. In the "book" the equations that appear in the text were typed in, without subscripts and super scripts. Some of highlighted equations were also typed in with a typewriter. The photo on the front cover is distorted and uncorrected. There are typing mistakes, spelling mistakes, and editing mistakes throughout the document. Instead of a table of contents there is a listing of the various sections of Einstein's writings. There are no chapter numbers or page numbers! And of course no index. In reading this document it appears that this is a collection of Einstein's early notes and essays that were never sent to a publisher. Save your money and find a properly published copy of Einstein's works.
Tansino
A special description of the basis and the meaning of the Theory. It really is elegant in its simplicity. Einstein's explanation of the basis and origin of Special Relativity is especially intuitive and easy to follow, even with just a background of high school geometry. It is also quiet surprising to find that the derivation of E = m c^2 comes from the necessity of the speed of light being constant for all reference frames in relative motion. The General Theory, however, really can't be understood apart from non-Euclidean geometry, so the explanation of it it's much harder to follow. It is still worth the read, though, to see Einstein's explanation of how the effect of gravity is indistinguishable from the effect of steady acceleration, and how this leads to the conclusion that space curves in the presence of mass. It will also surprise many, as it did me, of how much emphasis Einstein puts on the equivalence of time and space in the structure of the universe, compared to how little time he spends on the equivalent of energy and matter. All in all a great read.
Vuzahn
You would think, for the sake of credibility alone, that a publisher would familiarize themselves with the work they are publishing. First, a synopsis on the back of the volume states that Einstein was awarded the Nobel Prize for his work on relativity; he was, however, awarded the prize for his work on the photoelectric effect, NOT relativity. Second, the description of the book's content on Amazon follows Einstein's preface where he states "...are interested in the theory, but are not conversant with the mathematical apparatus of theoretical physics." They neglected to include the following "...presumes a standard education to that of a university matriculation examination." I had two semesters of college calculus and, believe me, I would otherwise have been at a serious disadvantage in any effort to grasp even a cursory understanding the book's content.