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Free eBook A Measure of Everything: An Illustrated Guide to the Science of Measurement download

by Christopher Joseph,Adam Parfitt,David Price

Free eBook A Measure of Everything: An Illustrated Guide to the Science of Measurement download ISBN: 1554070899
Author: Christopher Joseph,Adam Parfitt,David Price
Publisher: Firefly Books (January 12, 2006)
Language: English
Pages: 224
Category: Math Science
Subcategory: Experiments Instruments and Measurement
Size MP3: 1334 mb
Size FLAC: 1595 mb
Rating: 4.1
Format: azw mbr lit txt


Christopher Joseph studied Metallurgy and the Science of Materials at Trinity College, Oxford and is a member of the Institute of Materials, Minerals and Mining.

Christopher Joseph studied Metallurgy and the Science of Materials at Trinity College, Oxford and is a member of the Institute of Materials, Minerals and Mining. His published works range from scientific texts to historical articles.

Christopher Joseph, Adam Parfitt, Marcus Weeks, David Price. A Measure of Everything is a wide-ranging and comprehensive guide to what is measured and why. The book begins when the basic measurements were as simple as more, less and enough. As societies evolved, relative measurements were no longer sufficient. Short distances were measured in relation to parts of the human body. For example, the ancient measurement cubit was the length of a pharaoh's arm plus the width of his hand.

Joseph, Christopher; Parfitt, Adam, 1972-; Price, David, 1955-; Weeks, Marcus. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

A Measure of Everything book. In fact, measurement is an essential tool for survival.

The Story of Measurement A Measure of All Things: the Story of Man and Measurement, St A Measure of Everything: an Illustrated Guide to the Science of Measurement, Firefly Books. Recent general publications on the history of measurement include Andrew Robinson, The Story of Measurement, Thames and Hudson, 2007; Ian Whitelaw, A Measure of All Things: the Story of Man and Measurement, St. Martin's Press, 2007; Adam Parfitt, et a. A Measure of Everything: an Illustrated Guide to the Science of Measurement, Firefly Books, 2006, in addition to at least nine books.

A Measure of Everything An Illustrated Guide to the Science of Measurement. Reference Book Analysis. Susan Hanzelka LIBR 150: Spring 2008 Week 3 (500s). A Measure of Everything An Illustrated Guide to the Science of Measurement. Call Number: 53. 1 MLS Bibliographic Citation: Slideshow 410851 by ellery. 1 MLS Bibliographic Citation: Updated on Apr 07, 2019.

A Measure of Everything : An Illustrated Guide to the Science of. .

A Measure of Everything : An Illustrated Guide to the Science of Measurement.

Recent general publications on the history of measurement include Andrew Robinson, The Story of Measurement, Thames and Hudson, 2007; Ian Whitelaw, A Measure of All Things: the Story of Man and Measurement, St. Martin’s Press, 2007; Adam Parfitt, et a. A Measure o. in English since the mid-1970s listed in Tavernor’s bibliography. Authors and Affiliations.

Containing six sections, a comprehensive glossary, a Web site guide, and an index, Biology is an ideal learning tool for students and teachers of science. Full-colour diagrams, graphs, charts, and maps on every page illustrate the essential elements of the subject, while parallel text provides key definitions and step-by-step explanations. The six sections include: ''Planet Earth'' - considers Earth's place in the Solar System and its relationship to the Sun, the Moon, and the environment of interplanetary space

A comprehensive reference and history book on what is measured and why.

Measurement is one of humankind's oldest and most vital activities. By measuring height, speed, size, temperature, strength and many other factors, humans can compare, improve and progress. In fact, measurement is an essential tool for survival.

A Measure of Everything is a wide-ranging and comprehensive guide to what is measured and why.

The book begins when the basic measurements were as simple as more, less and enough. As societies evolved, relative measurements were no longer sufficient. Advances in language allowed more precise measurements. Short distances were measured in relation to parts of the human body. For example, the ancient measurement cubit was the length of a pharaoh's arm plus the width of his hand.

As society and culture progress and change, so do measurements. The rise of astronomy and the sciences demanded more exact measurements. These measurements are typically named after the discovering scientist, e.g., henry, curie, watt, rutherford, fahrenheit.

This book features 28 categories organized into three sections: Earth and Life Sciences: astronomy, distance, time, meteorology, medicine, and five others. Physical Sciences: chemistry, mathematics, physics, speed, weight, temperature, and three others. Technology and Leisure: computers, engineering, finance, food, textiles, and four others.

A Measure of Everything is an informative and entertaining book that will appeal to a wide range of readers.

User reviews
Via
It briefly describes units of measure, with 1-2 pictures per page. If you don't know what you are looking for, this is kinda useful. It's also useful if you just want to learn new units of measure you didn't know about. Do not get this book if you know what you are after and want a detailed understanding of it. The descriptions are very brief and some really insufficient for a solid understanding. Obviously there are also a lot of specialty measures left out (I'm sure this is for practical reasons, as one could likely fill many weighty volumes trying to catalog and define all currently used types of measures). Sadly this book has no historical information, and very very little information on how these units were derived. Overall I'm disappointed, but not enough to return the book as it was $6.
Jerinovir
Little in this book casts any light on the "Science of Measurment". In reality it is an endless list of definitions of words and terminolgy, the vast majority of which can be found in any good dictionary. This work tells you that an "Ocean-(is) a huge geographical mass of salt water" (pg 191). Whoa, be still my heart. That's informative.

The author(s) lifted definitions from the English dictionary, a medical dictionary, and the Handbook of Chemistry and Physics for most of the text. The remaining entries are definitions of totally unimportant achaic terms.
Vozuru
I recommend this very well written book for reference and study guide. Excellent layout and information. Useful for school and household.
Hamrl
"A measure of Everything" is a sort of encyclopedia of measurement units, but with many other definitions thrown in, without much rhyme or reason: the arpent is defined but the vara not, the Roche Limit defined but Chandrasekhar's not addressed, and transcendental numbers mentioned but not defined. And it is organized rather haphazardly into sections that are not subdivided alphabetically. No matter, the index takes care of that.

More to the point there are some technical errors:

* the illustration of the vernier (p. 38) shows it reading 5.5 mm, not 5.1

* the calendrists (p. 86) did not ADD 146,000 days every 400 years

* an excess of electrons (p. 104) is a negative (not
positive) charge.

It is enthralling browsing, but not dependable as a reference work.
Dibei
I bought this book that request of my 8-year old daughter, but have enjoyed thumbing through it myself.

To be sure, it is a dictionary of scientific measurement, not an encyclopaedia; yet almost all of the pages contain an illustration, chart, or graph of some kind.

The definitions are arranged by groupings: earth and life sciences, physical sciences, and Technology & leisure. Subheadings include such categories as astronomy, electricity, and music.

Having purchased this book, I do now rather with that there was an encyclopedia version of the same subject. The section on 'Time and Calendar', for instance, mostly just notes the Jewish, Gregorian, Islamic, and Hindu calendars with a passing nod at the Chinese and Egyptian calendar.

On the other hand, you can still scratch a lot of curious itches: "How do they determine what an 'era' is?" "Just what is Newtonian Time?" (Yes, I know, it's kept you up at night too...)

The book is most likely of interest to the generally curious, information nerds, and those with inquisitive children who enjoy learning more about the world around them. A decent reference book on its topic.

P.S. A last note: a dictionary format rather than an encyclopedia does allow the book to be small enough to carry about and read in a chair by smaller hands, something my daughter can't do with our Webster's Unabridged Dictionary.