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Free eBook El Nino and LA Nina: Weather in the Headlines download ISBN: 0585347476
Category: Math Science
Subcategory: Environment
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Includes bibliographical references (p. 73-74) and index.

Includes bibliographical references (p. Examines the El Niño and La Niña phenomena, why they occur, how meteorologists track them, how they affect global weather patterns, and their possible effect on global warming.

joʊ/; Spanish: ) is the warm phase of the El Niño–Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and is associated with a band of warm ocean water that develops in the central and east-central equatorial Pacific (between approximately the International Date Line and 120°W), including the area off the Pacific coast of South America. The ENSO is the cycle of warm and cold sea surface temperature (SST) of the tropical central and eastern Pacific Ocean

El Niño and La Niña years are easier to see in the deviations (anomalies) in the right hand panel. Water temperatures significantly warmer than the norm are shown in red, and water temperatures cooler than the norm are shown in blue

El Niño and La Niña years are easier to see in the deviations (anomalies) in the right hand panel. Water temperatures significantly warmer than the norm are shown in red, and water temperatures cooler than the norm are shown in blue. El Niño, where the water is warmer than normal, is indicated by the red/yellow colors, and can be seen in 1986-1987, 1991-1992, 1993, 1994, 1997-1998 and 2015-2016. La Niña, where the water is cooler than normal, is indicated by blue colors.

The El Niño–Southern Oscillation affects the location of the jet stream, which alters rainfall patterns across the West, Midwest, the Southeast, and throughout the tropics. The shift in the jet stream also leads to shifts in the occurrence of severe weather, and the number of tropical cyclones expected within the tropics in the Atlantic and Pacific oceans affected by changes in the ocean temperature and the subtropical jet stream.

Neither El Niño nor La Niña conditions are expected to be in place this winter, which can influence weather conditions . In the neutral phase the equatorial Pacific water doesn't push the atmosphere toward El Niño or La Niña

Neither El Niño nor La Niña conditions are expected to be in place this winter, which can influence weather conditions in the . In the neutral phase the equatorial Pacific water doesn't push the atmosphere toward El Niño or La Niña. This makes it more difficult to predict weather patterns over the next several months. It also means other atmospheric forces, such as the Arctic Oscillation, will impact the weather, but these other factors typically are harder to predict weeks in advance. MORE: Winter 2019-20 Outlook). Typical pattern seen during ENSO-neutral winters. What to Look For During a ENSO-Neutral Winter.

In stronger El Niño or La Niña episodes, these trends are even greater. Because most of the winter precipitation in Amarillo falls in the form of snow, the same trends of increased snowfall during El Niño and decreased snowfall during La Niña are also observed. For the months of October through April during the 60-year period from 1950 through 2009, observations of temperature and precipitation were grouped according to the state and strength of El Niño or La Niña. A similar graph of total snowfall verses Niño . Index also shows the positive correlation.

La Niña (/lɑːˈniːnjə/, Spanish pronunciation: ) is a coupled ocean-atmosphere phenomenon that is the colder counterpart of El Niño, as part of the broader El Niño–Southern Oscillation climate pattern. The name La Niña originates from Spanish, meaning "the little girl", analogous to El Niño meaning "the little boy". It has also in the past been called anti-El Niño, and El Viejo (meaning "the old man").

Typically, discussions of El Nino focus on Pacific Ocean water temperatures near the Equator, especially in the region . Therefore, El Nino and La Nina events do have far reaching impacts on general weather patterns over other parts of the world, including Canada

Typically, discussions of El Nino focus on Pacific Ocean water temperatures near the Equator, especially in the region just to the west of South America. During El Nino events we find warmer than average sea surface temperatures in this region. The image below is from the strong El Nino event of 1997-1998. Therefore, El Nino and La Nina events do have far reaching impacts on general weather patterns over other parts of the world, including Canada. Tendency to oversimplify. However, there is also a tendency to oversimplify the impact of El Nino on the weather.

La Niña is essentially the opposite of El Niño Q. How do these weather events affect winter weather? A. Because even the most dedicated scientists do not thoroughly understand El Niño and La Niña (we do not know.

La Niña is essentially the opposite of El Niño. La Niña refers to the periodic cooling of ocean surface temperatures in the central and east-central equatorial Pacific that occurs every 3 to 5 years or so. The cool water can suppress rain-producing clouds, which leads to dry conditions. See La Niña Pattern chart. Q. Because even the most dedicated scientists do not thoroughly understand El Niño and La Niña (we do not know, for instance, why the trade winds suddenly die down and allow the warm water pool to move eastward), we can only describe certain tendencies in the weather.