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Free eBook Hawaiian Volcanoes (A Latitude 20 Book) download

by William R. Halliday,Clarence E. Dutton

Free eBook Hawaiian Volcanoes (A Latitude 20 Book) download ISBN: 0824829603
Author: William R. Halliday,Clarence E. Dutton
Publisher: University of Hawaii Press (June 30, 2005)
Language: English
Pages: 224
Category: Math Science
Subcategory: Earth Sciences
Size MP3: 1903 mb
Size FLAC: 1684 mb
Rating: 4.9
Format: lrf rtf doc mbr


William R. Halliday (Foreword). Hawaiian Volcanoes, written by Clarence Edward Dutton as part of the 1883 Annual Report of the . Hawaiian Volcanoes (A Latitude 20 Book).

William R. Geological Survey, is the first comprehensive study of volcanism in Hawai'i. In addition to being of both scientific and historical interest today, it is a fine example of natural history writing. 0824829603 (ISBN13: 9780824829605).

Hawaiian Volcanoes, written by Clarence E. Dutton as part of the 1883 Annual Report of the . Geological Survey, is the first comprehensive study of volcanism in Hawai'i

Hawaiian Volcanoes, written by Clarence E.

Are you sure you want to remove Hawaiian Volcanoes (A Latitude 20 Book) from your list? Hawaiian Volcanoes (A Latitude 20 Book). by Clarence E. Dutton. Published July 1, 2005 by University of Hawaii Press.

Series: A Latitude 20 Book. Paperback: 240 pages. Hoover's book I like a lot better, he describes the fish in more general terms and adds anecdotes, like sayings the ancient Hawaiians had involving the fish (Parrot fish rubbing noses is a sure sign of flirting at home). I own this, but I read Hoover.

Herein are 20 legends of Hawaii’s volcanoes and the demigods which occupy them. Many of these legends are about Pele who according to Polynesian myth lives in Kilauea. The story of Pele’s arrival and occupation of Kilauea can be found in the very first story, AI-LAAU, THE FOREST EATER. Ai-laau lived in the volcano spewing forth his fire from the great crater when Pele came to the seashore far below. On seeing Pele, Ai-laau was fearful and fled leaving the volcano to her, where until this day she digs and continues to release plumes of fire and rivers of lava.

Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park, Volcano, Hawaii. and the park has some of everything Hawaii has to offer.

Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park, Volcano, Hawaii. Tropical, desert, all kinds of micro-climates within just the park. Hiking across the caldera (when it's not erupting, of course!) is one of the great experiences of life!

The book also includes a study of Hawaiian geology, which is essential to understanding how the .

The book also includes a study of Hawaiian geology, which is essential to understanding how the Hawaiian religion and classical Hawaiian stories developed.

Hawaiian Volcanoes, From Source to Surface is the outcome of an AGU Chapman Conference held on the Island of Hawai‘i in August 2012

Hawaiian Volcanoes, From Source to Surface is the outcome of an AGU Chapman Conference held on the Island of Hawai‘i in August 2012. Volume highlights include

The book takes its name from the two volcanoes that overshadow Quauhnahuac and the characters . But there is something about the destiny of the creation of the book that seems to tell me it just might go on selling a very long time

The book takes its name from the two volcanoes that overshadow Quauhnahuac and the characters, Popocatepetl and Iztaccihuatl. Under the Volcano was Lowry's second and last complete novel. The novel was adapted for radio on Studio One in 1947 but had gone out of print by the time Lowry died. But there is something about the destiny of the creation of the book that seems to tell me it just might go on selling a very long time. The letter includes a detailed summary of the book's key themes and how the author intended each of the 12 chapters to work; in the end, Cape published the novel without further revision.

Hawaiian Volcanoes, written by Clarence E. Dutton as part of the 1883 Annual Report of the U.S. Geological Survey, is the first comprehensive study of volcanism in Hawai‘i. In addition to being of both scientific and historical interest today, it is a fine example of natural history writing. It takes the form of an entrancing nineteenth-century "roadside geology" of the Big Island and much of Maui, combining Dutton's clear, elegant writing style with his eye for color and line and meticulously accurate observations of Hawai‘i's people and landscape, as well as its geological phenomena.

A new foreword discusses the importance of Dutton's ground-breaking report and its influence on subsequent research on Hawai‘i's volcanoes. The present volume also includes a colorful biographical sketch of Dutton, a discussion of his assignment to Hawai‘i, and a list of his principal writings.

User reviews
Goltizuru
VERY GOOD
Xig
A poetic work on volcanoes! Captain Dutton is a marvelous observer of the 19th century Hawaiian landscape. An early travel writer.
Stanober
Every country with volcanoes has its mythical explanations of them, but it took the restless, aggressive, skeptical, argumentative Euro-Americans to figure out how they work.

This process was barely under way 125 years ago, and Hawaii was their principal laboratory. The volcanoes of the Big Island were less dangerous and more reliable than those of the Mediterranean.

Clarence Dutton, who had spent years studying the geology of the western states, came to Hawaii in 1882, where he spent several months exploring by mule and on foot. Kilauea and Mauna Loa were cooperative.

His report, in the "The 4th Annual Report of the United States Geological Survey," is almost the only important 19th century publication about Hawaii that can still be collected by people who are not millionaires, although the commercial book vandals are busily destroying surviving copies of this beautiful book for its handsome maps and engravings.

Thus it is welcome on several grounds that the University of Hawaii Press has reprinted most of Dutton's report, with explanatory notes by William Halliday.

Dutton's report, though made to a government bureaucracy, was not a dry and impersonal treatise. Besides his comments on the geology, which impressed him mightily, he offers a narratiue with observations about the people, the weather and the animals he saw.

When he got to Haiku, on the lower flanks of Maui's dormant Haleakala volcano, after some warm hospitality from an unnamed rancher, he wrote, "Of all places that I have seen or read of, none approaches more nearly to my conception of paradise than this."

Yet later, when traveling around East Maui, his adventures were exhausting and dangerous. In those days, surviving the "road" to Hana was no joke, especially not for horses.

While on Maui, he jumped into a controversy about whether Haleakala Crater is a volcanic crater, a caldera (his preference) or a gigantic gully. Current opinion favors a gigantic erosional feature, though Halliday considers the matter not quite closed.

On the Big Island, Dutton spent a great deal of time considering the lava lakes of Halemaumau and Mokuaweoweo, dismissing the earlier notion that considered them to be craters of the Mount Etna type. He concluded that they should be considered to have come from a different process and suggested another name for this type of volcanic opening. His proposal, caldera, was accepted.

Halliday considers that Dutton's report was subtly designed to denigrate annexationist sentiments in the States. He even speculates that the abrupt conclusion of the report hints that someone in higher position censored his final pages because they were too clearly anti-annexationist. This would likely be missed by an uninstructed reader and must remain speculative. No other evidence seems to survive to prove the point.

Not a great deal is known about Dutton's life. He was a private man and his personal papers disappeared. But in the smaller America of the late 19th century he was a notable personality who was respected by those influential in both science and politics in the capital.

An Army man, he was specially detailed by Congress to explore the West -- a job that ended up encompassing Hawaii -- and though he is today remembered only by geologists, during his travels he wrote what Halliday calls "five of the most notable reports in American geological history."

The reproductions of the maps and engravings on cheap modern paper in this 21st century edition are but a pale shadow of their rich appearance on the thick, creamy rag paper used in the 1884 original, but this reprint deserves a place on every bookshelf of readers who care about Hawaii's natural history.