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Free eBook Art, Myth, and Ritual: The Path to Political Authority in Ancient China download

by K. C. Chang

Free eBook Art, Myth, and Ritual: The Path to Political Authority in Ancient China download ISBN: 0674048083
Author: K. C. Chang
Publisher: Harvard University Press; 1st edition (October 15, 1983)
Language: English
Pages: 160
Category: Math Science
Subcategory: Earth Sciences
Size MP3: 1668 mb
Size FLAC: 1742 mb
Rating: 4.7
Format: lrf mobi mbr lit


That being said, I found this short book of 140 just fascinating. Chang, Harvard University, was an acknowledged expert on ancient China and has written extensively on this topic.

That being said, I found this short book of 140 just fascinating. Although a must read for those interested in early civilizations, I believe that general readers would also find it interesting as well. Each chapter takes a different look into life in ancient China and what one can learn a great deal about the driving forces and powers in their lives.

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A leading scholar in the United States on Chinese archaeology challenges long-standing conceptions of the rise of political authority in ancient China. If you are a serious student of Chinese history and culture, you must own, not just read, this book. Its cross-disciplinary perspective makes it a book you will find yourself returning to on a regular. Clans Towns and the Political Landscape. 9. Moral Authority and Coercive Power.

Chang began his teaching career in the Anthropology Department at Yale . Art, Myth and Ritual: the Path to Political Authority in Ancient China (1983).

Chang began his teaching career in the Anthropology Department at Yale University and later became the chair of the department. In 1977, he returned to Harvard to chair its Department of Anthropology. He became a member of the United States National Academy of Sciences in 1979 and the John E. Hudson Professor of Archaeology at Harvard in 1984 Selected works.

Start reading Art, Myth and Ritual on your Kindle in under a minute. I must first confess that I love reading about ancient China and that I love collecting ancient Chinese artifacts. That being said, I found this short book of 140 just fascinating.

Kwang-Chih Chang, K C Chang. A leading scholar in the United States on Chinese archaeology challenges long-standing conceptions of the rise of political authority in ancient China. Questioning Marx's concept of an "Asiatic" mode of production, Wittfogel's "hydraulic hypothesis," and theories on the importance of technology, K. C. Chang builds an impressive counterargument, one which ranges widely from recent archaeological discoveries to studies of mythology, ancient Chinese poetry, and the iconography of Shang food vessels.

Art Myth and Ritual sets out an elegant yet convincing theory regarding the nature of the early Chinese state and the technological, ideological and social foundations on which it rested. By combining archaeology, classical studies and anthropology, Prof

Art Myth and Ritual sets out an elegant yet convincing theory regarding the nature of the early Chinese state and the technological, ideological and social foundations on which it rested. By combining archaeology, classical studies and anthropology, Prof. Chang (who is regarded as the international dean of Chinese archaeology by scholars on both sides of the Taiwan strait as well as in Europe and North America) provides his readers with a dynamic view of ancient Chinese statecraft and the religious ideas that made it possible.

Political Authority in Ancient China. Art, Myth, and Ritual: The Path to Political Authority in Ancient China.

4 Art as the Path to Authority (page 56). Read. 5 Writing as the Path to Authority (page 81). 7 The Rise of Political Authority (page 107). Appendix: The Kings of the Three Dynasties (page 131).

A leading scholar in the United States on Chinese archaeology challenges long-standing conceptions of the rise of political authority in ancient China. Questioning Marx’s concept of an “Asiatic” mode of production, Wittfogel’s “hydraulic hypothesis,” and cultural-materialist theories on the importance of technology, K. C. Chang builds an impressive counterargument, one which ranges widely from recent archaeological discoveries to studies of mythology, ancient Chinese poetry, and the iconography of Shang food vessels.
User reviews
Ximathewi
Other reviews will have discussed the content of this classic volume, so let me address the question I often find myself asking when deciding whether or not to purchase a book: Is this book a keeper? Is it enough to borrow it from a library and read it, or will I want to own it? (Confession: I am very keen on Chinese history.) Let me answer that question for you here:

If you are a serious student of Chinese history and culture, you must own, not just read, this book. Its cross-disciplinary perspective makes it a book you will find yourself returning to on a regular basis as your own knowledge and understanding of Chinese history and culture grows. Passages once oblique or of little interest to you previously, will suddenly become the glue of new associations and insights. You will also want to underline, make margin notations in, and add your own notes, even if you don't usually mark up books. I was on my way to the library to take out this book for a third time when I realized, this is a keeper.
Urllet
I must first confess that I love reading about ancient China and that I love collecting ancient Chinese artifacts. That being said, I found this short book of 140 just fascinating. Dr. K.C. Chang, Harvard University, was an acknowledged expert on ancient China and has written extensively on this topic. Although a must read for those interested in early civilizations, I believe that general readers would also find it interesting as well. Each chapter takes a different look into life in ancient China and what one can learn a great deal about the driving forces and powers in their lives. I find this book a good reference book as I translate and study ancient Chinese artifacts in my collection. The index is well worn in my copy as I refer to it often to research an item or concept in ancient China. Although published in 1983, it still stands as a classic about early Chinese society. So if your studying either ancient or modern China it is must read for you.
Isha
Library item covered with rollerball writings by generations of students !
Anarasida
Few are the books that contain so many insights in so few and interesting pages. One is happy to hold up this short text as an example of close and clear analysis. Of course, this is not airport literature, but whoever puts the effort into reading it, and savors the various strands of argumentation, comes away with a clearer (if not complete) view of pre-imperial China. It is a welcome prelude to Harvard UP's History of Imperial China, which begins abruptly with the Qin Empire The Early Chinese Empires: Qin and Han (History of Imperial China).

How did pre-imperial China emerge from the Neolithic age? The author, who focuses on the period of the Three Dynasties (2200 -256 BC), sets out to show that it emerged as "various factors enabled political power to be concentrated in the hands of a ruling elite" (pg. 107). In other words, it is once again the story of an elite getting its hands on the emerging economic surplus and creating all sorts of mostly symbolic mechanisms to hold on to it over generations. In the final chapter the author dismisses Marx's "Oriental society" deprived of property, Max Weber's "patrimonial state", and Wittvogel's "hydraulic society". The essential difference is that Chang's world is essentially changing and dynamic, rather than static and unchangeable as in Western "theories".

As agricultural surplus eventuated, villages organized themselves into clans and agnate lineages; the elites also relied on moral authority, coercive force, and exclusive access to spiritual world (shamanism, rituals, and associated paraphernalia) to establish and maintain themselves - it was a politically, rather than a technologically-driven process.

The walk through early Chinese art, the conspicuous production (and destruction by interment with the dead ruler) of bronze vessels, the emergence of Chinese writing as record of communications from the ancestors into this world, all subtly lead to the final chapter 7, where the arguments are marshaled to full effect. After the short introduction I'd suggest having a go at this chapter first and then again after reading through the book. For in this chapter we have the description of the emerging civilization for the Neolithic period (7000 - 2200 BC), and the author shows how one by one the "various factors" are put in place in an emergent fashion. One understands the line of argument better this way.

On a personal note, I'm wary of "theories" and "models", and strongly favor "small causes that have huge effects", or "emergence through a mix of necessity and contingence" - tinkering with various causally interrelated factors (and feedback loops) until by trial and error a winning combination is found. This book celebrates such a view of history, and one feels slightly comforted in noting that authorities from halfway around the world, with large field experience, seem to move in the same direction.
Adokelv
Prof Chang offered this comprehensive but concise book to guide readers for further research and study. This book showed the Chinese way of development of civilization of five thousand years. The Chinese way of power and authority is based on moral authority and not coercive power, sage philosophy. Also art and writing lead to the path of authority. Power and authority are not hereditary but by moral and education. Study hard on the classic to pass the civil examination will climb the ladder to be government officials. It is a fair and better opportunity for all under heaven. To select the qualified and capable by civil exam was quickly adopted in the West, even in California!

This book is a handy reference for the hawks who perceive the rise of China as a threat to the region and the world. Coercive power will not win hearts and minds. Only moral authority will do! Are we going to learn from the wisdom of Chinese sages?