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Free eBook Monogamy: Mating Strategies and Partnerships in Birds, Humans and Other Mammals download

by Ulrich H. Reichard,Christophe Boesch

Free eBook Monogamy: Mating Strategies and Partnerships in Birds, Humans and Other Mammals download ISBN: 0521819733
Author: Ulrich H. Reichard,Christophe Boesch
Publisher: Cambridge University Press (September 15, 2003)
Language: English
Pages: 278
Category: Math Science
Subcategory: Biological Sciences
Size MP3: 1513 mb
Size FLAC: 1846 mb
Rating: 4.4
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This book is based primarily on a workshop held at the Max Planck Institute .

This book is based primarily on a workshop held at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in 2003. Following an introduction to monogamy by Ulrich Reichard, there are 15 chapters that fall loosely under the general headings Evolution of social monogamy, Reproductive strategies of socially monogamous males and females, and Reproductive strategies of human and nonhuman primates. The majority of chapters (11) deal with mammals; only two deal with birds, and two with humans.

Ulrich H. Reichard, Christophe Boesch

Ulrich H. Reichard, Christophe Boesch. Cambridge University Press, 11 сент.

by Ulrich H Reichard.

Birds and mammals may influence long-time development of woodland. Conservational strategies traditionally try to minimize or even avoid such zoogenic impact. But as most of such activities, like browsing, bark-scaling, excavating of treetrunks, digging in soil, and even killing extensive tree-stands, follow species specific life-strategies, such Impact schould get accepted as natural - and. therefore integrated in the management of reserves.

This book provides an up-to-date and important contribution on monogamy in birds, humans and other mammals. this is an excellent and very informative book which will be of use to anyone interested in mating systems and mating strategies

This book provides an up-to-date and important contribution on monogamy in birds, humans and other mammals. this is an excellent and very informative book which will be of use to anyone interested in mating systems and mating strategies.

Mating Strategies and Partnerships in Birds, Humans and Other Mammals. Savini, Tommaso Boesch, Christophe and Reichard, Ulrich H. 2009. Varying Ecological Quality Influences the Probability of Polyandry in White-handed Gibbons (Hylobates lar) in Thailand. Biotropica, Vol. 41, Issue.

267 pages, Figs, tabs. Publisher: Cambridge University Press. Introduction: 1. Monogamy: past and present Ulrich H. Reichard; Part I. Evolution of Social Monogamy: 2. The evolution of monogamy: mating relationships, parental care and sexual selection Anders Pape MA ller; 3. Mate guarding and the evolution of social monogamy in mammals Peter N. M. Brotherton and Petr E. Komers; 4. The evolution of social monogamy in primates Carel P. van Schaik and. Peter M. Kappeler; 5. The evolution of social and reproductive monogamy in Peromyscus David O. Ribble; Part II.

Quaranta 4 sexes under specific conditions. From a cultural prospective when these three conditions change so does the human mating strategy. Why do males of some species live with a single mate when they are capable of fertilizing more than one female's eggs?

Ulrich H. Why do males of some species live with a single mate when they are capable of fertilizing more than one female's eggs? Why do some females pair only with one male, and not with several partners? Why do birds usually live in pairs and feed chicks together whilst mammals often live in larger groups with females rearing their young without male help? These questions form the central theme of this book

Why do birds often live in pairs and rear chicks together, whereas female mammals usually live in groups and rear their young without male help? Why do males sometimes live with a single mate when they are capable of fertilizing more than one female's eggs? Is male helping behavior important for monogamous partnerships? This book provides answers concerning the biological roots of social monogamy in animal groups as diverse as ungulates, carnivores, rodents, birds and primates (including humans) for students and researchers in behavioral ecology, evolutionary anthropology and zoology.