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Free eBook Gorgon: Paleontology, Obsession, and the Greatest Catastrophe in Earth's History download

by Peter Ward

Free eBook Gorgon: Paleontology, Obsession, and the Greatest Catastrophe in Earth's History download ISBN: 0670030945
Author: Peter Ward
Publisher: Viking Adult; 1st edition (January 19, 2004)
Language: English
Pages: 288
Category: Math Science
Subcategory: Biological Sciences
Size MP3: 1562 mb
Size FLAC: 1934 mb
Rating: 4.9
Format: docx doc mobi azw


In Gorgon, Ward examines the strange fate of this little known prehistoric animal and its contemporaries, the ancestors of the turtle, the crocodile, the lizard, and eventually . Are we vulnerable to a similar catastrophe?

In Gorgon, Ward examines the strange fate of this little known prehistoric animal and its contemporaries, the ancestors of the turtle, the crocodile, the lizard, and eventually dinosaurs. He offers provocative theories on these mass extinctions and confronts the startling implications they hold for us. Are we vulnerable to a similar catastrophe? Are we nearing the end of human domination in the earth’s cycle of destruction and rebirth? Gorgon is also a thrilling travelogue of Ward’s long, remarkable journey of discovery and a real-life adventure deep into Earth’s history.

In this book, Ward examines the fate of this little-known prehistoric animal and its contemporaries, the ancestors of the turtle, the crocodile, the lizard, and eventually dinosaurs. He offers theories on these mass extinctions and confronts the implications they hold for u. From publisher description.

In Gorgon, geologist Peter Ward turns his attention reluctantly away from the asteroid collision that killed all the .

In Gorgon, geologist Peter Ward turns his attention reluctantly away from the asteroid collision that killed all the dinosaurs and instead focuses on a much older extinction event. As it turns out, the Permian extinction of 250 million years ago dwarfs the dino's 65-million-year-old Cretaceous-Tertiary armageddon.

GORGON Paleontology, Greatest. Obsession, in. and. Earth's. Collection of D o r o t h y Spears. Library of congress C a t a L o g I n g - I n - p u b L I C a t I o n data. Ward, Peter Douglas Gorgon : paleontology, obsession, and the greatest catastrophe in earth's history, Peter Ward. p. cm. Includes bibliographical references and index.

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Gorgon: Paleontology, Obsession, and the Greatest Catastrophe in Earth's History as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

com In Gorgon, geologist Peter Ward turns his attention reluctantly away from the asteroid collision that killed all the dinosaurs and instead focuses on a much older extinction event

com In Gorgon, geologist Peter Ward turns his attention reluctantly away from the asteroid collision that killed all the dinosaurs and instead focuses on a much older extinction event. As it turns out, the Permian extinction of 250 million years ago dwarfs the dino’s 65-million-year-old Cretaceous-Tertiary armageddon.

British Wildlife is the leading natural history magazine in the UK, providing essential reading for both enthusiast and professional naturalists and wildlife conservationists

British Wildlife is the leading natural history magazine in the UK, providing essential reading for both enthusiast and professional naturalists and wildlife conservationists. Subscriptions from £30 per year. Go to British Wildlife. Conservation Land Management. 4 issues per year 44 pages per issue Subscription only.

This listing is for Gorgon : Paleontology, Obsession, and the .

This listing is for Gorgon : Paleontology, Obsession, and the Greatest Catastrophe in Earth's History by Peter Douglas Ward (2004, Hardcover) : Peter. For US customer standard shipping is Media mail typically which takes 5-9 business days for customers living in the continental US. Customers that upgrade to priority mail can expect delivery within 2-4 business days.

Download PDF book format. Rubrics: Catastrophes (Geology) Geology, Stratigraphic Permian Geology, Structural South Africa Karroo. Choose file format of this book to download: pdf chm txt rtf doc. Download this format book. Gorgon : paleontology, obsession, and the greatest catastrophe in earth's history Peter D. Ward. Download now Gorgon : paleontology, obsession, and the greatest catastrophe in earth's history Peter D. Download PDF book format. Download DOC book format.

Manufacturer: Viking Adult Release date: 19 January 2004 ISBN-10 : 0670030945 ISBN-13: 9780670030941.

An investigation into a 250-million-year-old environmental apocalypse that predated the age of the dinosaurs describes an event that caused the annihilation of ninety percent of all plant and animal species on Earth, taking a close up look at the prehistoric world of the gorgons, the causes of mass extinctions, and their implications for the future of humankind.
User reviews
Grosho
I bought this book hoping to learn more about the gorgonopsians and other mammal-like reptiles. No such luck. This book contains very little about the mammal-like reptiles. In fact, it is almost entirely free of scientific facts.

It is about Peter Ward's experiences working in the Karoo desert of South Africa in the 1990s and early 2000s. During the 1980s, he had worked on the KT boundary, and the conclusion that the KT mass extinction was caused by an asteroid hit caused him to wonder whether the Permian/Triassic mass extinction also result from some sort of catastrophe. That was the ostensible purpose of the fieldwork. But this book is really about paleontological fieldwork, and the thoughts and emotions that go through a paleontologists mind as he struggles to find fossils in a very harsh and forbidding environment. Ward is a good writer, and the book is very readable, it's just that I would not have bought it if I'd known it was just a journal or diary written during the author's Karoo field work.

The last few chapters have a rushed discussion of the current opinions about the P/T mass extinction, but that problem has apparently never been solved. The author notes that most of the hypotheses have been falsified, and engages in some unconvincing speculation that lower oxygen levels caused the extinction. But the real point of the book is just to give the reader a feel for the day-to-day emotions of paleontological fieldwork, and on that level it succeeds.
Yalone
I have read a number of books discussing the PT extinction prior to this and it was interesting to read an account from someone who helped redefine thinking on this event. I enjoyed the account by Dr Ward and found the mix of science with travelog very entertaining.
Legionstatic
I had to buy three copies of this book, nobody would believe me, so I gave it as presents. There were a lot of crazy critters out there in the last 4.567 billion years. Good luck if we can match the past chaos and live to tell about it.
Schnozz
Beabandis
I found this book tucked away in my eldest's library. Intrigued by the picture of a seeming cross between a reptile and a saber-toothed tiger on the cover (also that catchy title), I decided to give it a go.

My, my, life is full of surprises. First, I was unaware (or forgot) except in the most rudimentary way that there were actual large-ish animals before the dinosaurs. Ward describes his life-long effort to discover more about them through studying fossils and rock strata in a place called the Karoo Desert in South Africa. He is concerned with figuring out how the animals became extinct. Over time, he and his colleagues find that the extinction was rapid (in geological terms--probably less than100,000 years or so)and eventually concluding that the die-out was caused by global warming. The warming was caused, he posits, by an excess of methane gas, which somehow or other--I'm no chemist--leeches the oxygen out of the air.

Okay, so far so good. But the real story here is how obsessed the scientists become: never giving up, living under the harshest conditions one can imagine, eternally picking at the rocks to find fossils. Family and health are given short shrift; these are dedicated people. The story of their lives is more interesting than the story of the Gorgon.

Another fascinating aspect of the book is the coverage of the internal feuds among scientists, who become heavily invested in their own theories.

The book is interesting and compelling, but the technical terms make it difficult for the layperson to keep track of what's going on in the science end of things. If you're interested in paleontology or global warming and can read Stephen Jay Gould's work, this would be a great choice for you. It will require strict attention if your level of interest in science is limited to the kind of book written by Simon Winchester.

1.1 *s knocked off for difficulty level and a slight lack of closure
Amarin
Science books are pretty much susceptible to their times, and the early 2006 discovery of a huge crater in Antarctic Wilkes Land, which may have been four to five times the size of the K-T Impactor, seems to have given great credence to the belief that it was the primary, if not sole, cause of the P-T extinction event. Furthermore, unlike the K-T Impactor, there is growing evidence that the P-T Impactor may have actually broken the continent of Australia off from Antarctica, and led to the breakup of the ancient supercontinent of Gondwanaland. Given this turn of events, it might seem that Ward's book should be simply tossed on the heap of outdated science books, for he is not a great essayist in the manner of a Stephen Jay Gould, whose often wrong posits on evolution did not kybosh his ability to effectively communicate ideas, nor is Ward anywhere in a class with the magisterial Loren Eiseley, whose `hidden personal essay' format preceded Gould's, and whose work is one of the great English language prose corpuses of the last century, even if his decades old ideas on evolution are several generations removed from relevance.

Yet, here is where idiot luck comes in. While Ward is no prose stylist, and one almost feels he is a primitivist or idiot savant banging away at keyboards, he made one very smart decision in writing this book, or, at least, a fortuitous one, which was to make this book less about `hard science', and more about the soft stuff in between. Gorgon focuses far more on the personalities of scientists, the desires for relevance, the politics of the South African lands where the Karoo Desert digs that constitute this book's Ground Zero take place, and his own personal family ups and downs. Thus, what was a squooshy weakness before the Antarctic discovery, becomes the book's saving grace after it....Last year, I read a much more well written book called Snowball Earth, by Gabrielle Walker, which was everything this book wanted to be. It provided a provocative theory of an almost wholly glaciated earth a half billion years before this ancient impact, and it did so in a lively, engaging style that presented both its theory and personalities in an engaging, well-written style. This book, unfortunately, barely touches upon its own titular subject, which is really the reason most layfolk would buy it. We get too little of the gorgonopsians and too much of filler. This book won't be of much use in a decade or two, and Ward does not have a great future in science writing the way Walker does, but this book did give more than a few moments of pleasure in its slow meandering, which again recapitulated its ideas about drying Permian rivers, and will leave at least a few dried beds within that will occasionally urge me to rethink its lost waters. If this goes against my usual criteria for recommending a book, so be it. If a man can't be willfully dissonant, on rare occasions, does his usual consistency have any virtue? As for Mr. Ward, he can thank me at a later date.