» » Sea of slaughter

Free eBook Sea of slaughter download

by Farley Mowat

Free eBook Sea of slaughter download ISBN: 0871130130
Author: Farley Mowat
Publisher: Atlantic Monthly Press (1984)
Language: English
Pages: 438
Category: Math Science
Subcategory: Biological Sciences
Size MP3: 1183 mb
Size FLAC: 1974 mb
Rating: 4.9
Format: txt mobi lrf mbr


in March and April large numbers approach the Gulf of St. Lawrence just keeping outside the drifting ice.

Farley Mowat Sea of Slaughter back cover of original paperback. As Anthony De Jasay once wrote, there is a sort of Gresham's law of everything, that the bad drives out the good. He called it a Gresham's Law of institutions, (he was referring primarily to secret police agencies), but I think it applies to just about everything.

Sea of Slaughter book. The Sea Shepherd Conservation Society ship RV Farley Mowat was named in honour of him, and he frequently visited it to assist its mission. Books by Farley Mowat

Sea of Slaughter book. Books by Farley Mowat. Mor. rivia About Sea of Slaughter.

The Sporting Life Although the elimination of the Eskimo curlew was perhaps the most spectacular and barbaric tragedy to strike the great family of shorebirds and waders, it does not stand alone.

The Sporting Life Although the elimination of the Eskimo curlew was perhaps the most spectacular and barbaric tragedy to strike the great family of shorebirds and waders, it does not stand alone e forty species, ranging from the minute least sandpiper to the imposing long-billed curlew, frequented the eastern seaboard at the time of first European contact, either as birds of passage or as breeding summer residents. All, without exception, were shot, netted, or otherwise slaughtered on a fearful scale.

Farley McGill Mowat, OC (May 12, 1921 – May 6, 2014) was a Canadian writer and environmentalist. He achieved fame with the publication of his books on the Canadian north, such as People of the Deer (1952) and Never Cry Wolf (1963).

Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

When it was first published nearly thirty years ago, Sea of Slaughter served as a catalyst for environment reform, raising awareness of the decline and destruction of marine and coastal species. Today, it remains a prescient and chilling environmental classic, serving, now as ever, as a haunting reminder of the impact of human interest on the natural world. Nonfiction Climate Change. To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate

SEA OF SLAUGHTER,by Farley Mowat, illustrated by Rob Tuckerman, Batman Books, printed in 1985.

Doing that is against . and international laws. SEA OF SLAUGHTER,by Farley Mowat, illustrated by Rob Tuckerman, Batman Books, printed in 1985. This item is a book 6" by 9" 438 page softcover copy. This book is in good condition with some soiling and rubbing of the covers, there is one sticker inside the front cover, some pages have some writing on the but the pages are readable. This is a heavy volume and will be shipped USPS Media Mail.

Farley Mowat, bestselling author of Never Cry Wolf, A Whale for the Killing, and The Dog Who Wouldn't Be, calls Seal of Slaughter his most important work...a book he felt compelled to write after witnessing the drastic decline in the rich diversity of wildlife along the Northeastern seaboard.Farley Mowat does not tell of the extinction of one species. His unforgettable narrative tells of the devastation of all different types of animal life from a region where the forests once teemed with game, where the fish could be scooped up with baskets...and where the Eskimo curlew fell in clouds of thousands to sportsmen who used them for target practice before turning their guns to clay pigeons.With his unique storytelling gift, Farley Mowat details why some creatures, such as the gentle penguin-like great auk, have vanished forever. And he astounds us with his account of the killing that continues--of wolf and whale, seal and bear, fish and fowl. Monumental in scope, chilling in its impact, Sea of Slaughter is a warning, a vision, and a powerful testament for preserving the living grandeur fast disappearing from our world.From the Paperback edition.
User reviews
MarF
Farley Mowat Sea of Slaughter back cover of original paperback. This book
is an excellent exposition of the result of the very basic rule that
common resources will be destroyed when access to them is only regulated
by individual self interest. As Anthony De Jasay once wrote, there is a
sort of Gresham's law of everything, that the bad drives out the good.
He called it a Gresham's Law of institutions, (he was referring primarily
to secret police agencies), but I think it applies to just about
everything. In the case of common resources such as forests, fisheries,
environmental quality, the whole economy, etc, the destruction results
from the grim reality that participants who try to take a long view,
preserving resources for future use, will be driven to the wall by
participants who think of absolutely nothing but their own immediate self
aggrandizement. As Matthew Arnold once wrote Nations are not great
because their people are intelligent and energetic. Nations are great
when that intelligence and that energy are active in the service of a
higher purpose than that of a single person taken by himself. The quote
from the original back cover follows:

Farley Mowat, bestselling author of "Never Cry Wolf", "A Whale for Killing", and
"The Dog Who Wouldn't Be" , calls Sea of Slaughter his most important work. . .
a book he felt compelled to write after witnessing the drastic decline in the
rich diversity of wildlife along the Northeastern seaboard.
Farley Mowat does not tell of the extinction of one species. His
unforgettable narrative tells of the devastation of all different
types of animate life from a region where the forests once teemed
with game, where fish could be scooped up with baskets. . .
and where the Eskimo curlew fell in clouds of thousands to sportsmen who used
them for target practice beror3e turning their guns to clay pigeons.

With his unique storytelling gift, Farley Mowat details why some
creatures, such as the gentle penguin-like great auk, have vanished
forever. And he stuns us with his account of the killing that continues
- of wolf and whale, seal and bear, fish and fowl. Monumental in
scope, chilling in its impact, Sea of Slaughter is a warning, a vision,
and powerful testament for preserving the living grandeur fast
disappearing from our world
Gold Crown
Like a time machine back to a time where nature's bounty was free to thrive and prosper, and it did, at an almost imaginable level....and then an honest accounting of the horrific destruction wrought on that bountry, by men. This is not a story, this is a catalog of horrors that reveal the true nature of man. A sad documentary that NEEDS to be absorbed, in order to provide the perspective so often missing these days.
Dark_Sun
This is a difficult book to read-- written in the 1970s, it tells the stories of various species which were then, and continue to be, in decline. It is a sad story, mostly because it is the story of ignorance and greed and their direct consequences. This book is as scary as Rachel Carson's "Silent Spring". You SHOULD read it, but don't expect it to be fun.
Kecq
this is a book that should be in every school room . In exquisite detail it describes the absolute brutality
we exploited the oceans and slaughtered marine mammals. There is no thought of preservation,
no thought of the future. The Holocaust did not just exist during world war 11 --in our oceans
over centuries ---maybe it will stimulate some thinking.
IWantYou
Again Mowat delivers in an attempt to wake up the predators, humans, of how they have wasted resources, their own humanity and their partners on this earth...a must read for any politician of where we are headed with managing our land and sea.
superstar
What is really happening to species in the oceans? Why have we finally fotten some international controls in place? Read this book and you will find out why. At points it is sickening and not for the faint of heart, but it is LIFE not only for the mammals, but for humans also. It is the truth he speaks, and every word he writes. This book is for people who either put their heads in the sand and don't want to know what is going on in the world, and gives fuel and puts the smoking gun into the hands of those willing to speak out and change things for the better.
happy light
GOOD BOOK THANK AWCYOU
Since reading Mowat's "Sea of Slaughter," I can't get a certain picture out of my mind. It is of a sandy ocean beach, miles and miles long, where tens of thousands, if not hundreds of thousands of morse came to socialize every summer until the middle of last century. The morse, or northern walrus, was a stupendous animal, of impressive bearing: a veritable lion of the sea. Yet it comes no more to those grounds, once the largest colony of its kind, out on Canada's Magdalene Islands, off the coast of Québec.
To think that the morse were just a side-show to it all. To think that eventually, with the same energy and relentless mechanical force, we would come to decimate the northern fishery more or less entirely, leaving thousands of perplexed fisher folk stranded in coastal villages, wondering perhaps, just where that many fish could possibly have gone.
On land, as in the water, nature's bounty was scarcely less prolific, the European's first reaction, scarcely less horrendous. Could this be the true, unknown history of North America, lying behind and directly concerning those early pilots and navigators like Cabot and Columbus. 400 or more years of unbelievably short-sighted culling of mighty herds, whether they were whales or bison or a hundred other species of birds and mammals known to have been hunted to the last. This is Mowat's sad chronicle. This is his portrait of what one day perhaps, will generally be known and accepted as history. And the only thing that may stop us is that we find we really don't want to ever learn this sort of truth.
Besides being a remarkable contribution to the literature of ecology and environment, this is also one of Mowat's finest personal efforts. You can see by the very nature of the material that it took a being of remarkable strength just to tackle a project like this, let alone bring it to a conclusion. It's probably true that one can prepare all one's life for just one event. In Mowat's case, without negating any other part of his remarkable œuvre, this may just be it.