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Free eBook Greek Astronomy (Dover Books on Astronomy) download

by Sir Thomas L. Heath

Free eBook Greek Astronomy (Dover Books on Astronomy) download ISBN: 0486266206
Author: Sir Thomas L. Heath
Publisher: Dover Publications (1991)
Language: English
Pages: 256
Category: Math Science
Subcategory: Astronomy and Space Science
Size MP3: 1750 mb
Size FLAC: 1109 mb
Rating: 4.9
Format: lrf doc rtf mobi


Astronomy & Space Science.

Astronomy & Space Science. Thomas Little Heath: Bringing the Past to Life Thomas Little Heath (1861–1940) was unusual for an authority on many esoteric, and many less esoteric, subjects in the history of mathematics in that he was never a university professor. The son of an English farmer from Lincolnshire, Heath demonstrated his academic gifts at a young age; studied at Trinity College, Cambridge, from 1879 to 1882; came away with numerous awards; and obtained the top grade in the 1884 English Civil Service examination.

Essential reading for scholars and students of astronomy and the history of science. In. Dover Publications,Butterick Publishing Co.

Superb scholarly study documents extraordinary contributions of Pythagoras, Aristarchus, Hipparchus, Anaxagoras, many other thinkers in laying the foundations of scientific astronomy. Essential reading for scholars and students of astronomy and the history of science. Astronomy & Space. To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate. The Art of Knitting. Dover Publications. Medieval Literature: A Basic Anthology.

A Dover Original Thomas Little Heath (1861–1940) was unusual for an authority on many esoteric, and many less esoteric, subjects in the history of mathematics in that he. .Greek Astronomy Dover Books on Astronomy. Издание: перепечатанное.

A Dover Original Thomas Little Heath (1861–1940) was unusual for an authority on many esoteric, and many less esoteric, subjects in the history of mathematics in that he was never a university professor.

Greek Astronomy (Dover Books on Astronomy) by Sir Thomas L. Space And Astronomy History Of Astronomy Egyptians Greeks Any Book Johannes Kepler Natural Philosophy Isaac Newton Dover Publications.

The books cover all the areas of astrophysics, cosmology, solar and stellar physics, celestial mechanics, astrobiology. These books and papers cover all the areas of astrophysics, cosmology, galactic and extragalactic astronomy, solar and stellar physics, celestial mechanics, planetary science, astrobiology, as well as some popular works.

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Greek Astronomy - Sir Thomas L. Heath Greek astronomy, Thomas L. Heath. Heath, Thomas Little, Sir, 1861-1940. Greek astronomy, Thomas L.

series Dover Books on Astronomy.

Plus de 12 Sciences Dover Books on Astronomy en stock neuf ou d'occasion. Sir Thomas L. Heath (Auteur)

Plus de 12 Sciences Dover Books on Astronomy en stock neuf ou d'occasion. Heath (Auteur). Superb scholarly study documents extraordinary contributions of Pythagoras, Aristarchus, Hipparchus, Anaxagoras, many other thinkers in laying the foundations of scientific astronomy Lire la suite.

Greek Astronomy (Dover Books on Astronomy). Heath, Sir Thomas L. Published by Dover Publications (1991). ISBN 10: 0486266206 ISBN 13: 9780486266206.

Astronomy as a science began with the Ionian philosophers, with whom Greek philosophy and mathematics also began. While the Egyptians and Babylonians had accomplished much of astronomical worth, it remained for the unrivalled speculative genius of the Greeks, in particular, their mathematical genius, to lay the foundations of the true science of astronomy. In this classic study, a noted scholar discusses in lucid detail the specific advances made by the Greeks, many of whose ideas anticipated the discoveries of modern astronomy.Pythagoras, born at Samos about 572 B.C., was probably the first to hold that the earth is spherical in shape, while his later followers anticipated Copernicus with the then-startling hypothesis that the earth was not the center of the universe but a planet like the others. Heraclides of Pontus (c. 388–315 B.C.), a pupil of Plato, declared that the apparent daily rotation of the heavenly bodies is due, not to a rotation of the heavenly sphere about an axis through the center of the earth, but to the rotation of the earth itself around its own axis. Secondly, Heraclides discovered that Venus and Mercury revolve around the sun like satellites. Perhaps the greatest astronomer of antiquity was Hipparchus, who flourished between 161 and 126 B.C. He compiled a catalog of fixed stars to the number 850 or more, made great improvements in the instruments used for astronomical observations, and discovered the precession of the equinoxes, among other accomplishments. The astronomy of Hipparchus takes its definitive form in the Syntaxis (commonly called the Almagest) of Ptolemy, written about A.D. 150, which held the field until the time of Copernicus.The extraordinary achievements of these and many more Greek theorists are given full coverage in this erudite account, which blends exceptional clarity with a readable style to produce a work that is not only indispensable for astronomers and historians of science but easily accessible to science-minded lay readers.

User reviews
Qiahmagha
If you really love the history of astronomy, (and you're interested in the Greeks) then this book is perfect. It is a collection of what Greek authors ACTUALLY said. All the big names are in here. Even Philolaus is in here. It's just wonderful. There is a little introduction to each astronomer and then it's on to what they wrote. I find it invaluable.
Samulkree
Having been truly astonished by the towering mathematical achievements of the ancient Greeks, as translated in many books by Heath, I was equally astonished by how weak the ancient Greeks were in astronomy. Probably more than half of the extracts from ancient works in this book are pure waffle.

It seems that the ancient Greeks, from about 850 to 150 BC, gave the world the first alphabet, mathematical proofs, history, philosophy, democracy, politics, the olympic games, gymnasiums, university education, coins, wages, mercenary armies, jury trials, literacy (about 50%), book-shops, and civilisation itself. What they didn't do well at was astronomy, physics and chemistry, as far as I can tell. But this introductory essay by Heath, and the numerous quotations and fragments, left me scratching my head, trying to think why they could be so weak in a subject which is, on the face of it, amenable to logical, rational analysis.

There are some clues in this book to the reasons for the dismal failure of Greek Astronomy. There is a quote on pages 28-29 from Plutarch about Anaxagoras, saying this:

"For Anaxagoras, who was the first to put in writing, most clearly and most courageously of all men, the explanation of the moon's illumination and darkness, did not belong to ancient times, and even his account was not common property, but was still a secret, current only among a few, and received by them with caution, or simply on trust. For in those days they refused to tolerate the natural philosophers and star-gazers, as they were then called, who presumed to fritter away the deity into unreasoning causes, blind forces, and necessary properties. Thus Protogoras was exiled, and Anaxagoras was imprisoned, and with difficulty saved by Pericles."

There are several other quotations which suggest a similar danger in publishing rational astronomy ideas which contradicted religion. Plato, pages 40-42, wrote that knowledge can not be obtained from observation, but must rather be determined by thinking about it. The writings of Aristotle were complete twaddle, and this book contains some prime examples of Aristotle's twaddle-thinking. The fact that Aristotle's views on astronomy were enforced throughout the Dark Ages until Copernicus, Galileo and others put a stop to it, is the reason why science was held back for more than 1600 years. The Geminus quote on pages 123-125 strongly argues that astronomers should keep their noses out of physics and not try to step into the territory of philosophers.

So I can highly recommend this book to see how the ancient Greeks totally failed in astronomy. They didn't even know as much as the earlier Mesopotamians and Egyptians. Luckily the book is short, so the pain is mercifully brief.
Celore
Quite ordinary: skillfully written, but not much more than what can be read from Wikipedia. Late antique is almost totally forgotten and mathematical methods are not mentioned (which is surprising, regarding the vast amount of mathematical translations by author). Good sides: quite long source texts of ancient astronomy (some of which are quite rare) at the end of the book, cheap price.
Preve
not bad, but not quite what i was looking for: no complaints.
Legend 33
This book is, like so many other on this subject, weak on providing convincing evidence on the involvement of ancient Greeks with astronomy. There is a good reason for this. This is that for the Greeks masters (Pythagoras, Socrates, etc.) astronomía had nothing at all to do with astronomy.

This can be verified with the Socrates Code (See “Man, the measure of all things?” in The Philosopher, V. 102 No. 2). This explains that astronomía characterises the self-observed knowledge (wisdom) about the eidetically perceived kósmos on a particular step of the step-wise ascent of the psyché. This ís, for instance, reported in the theologumena arithmeticae (see p. 56 in The Theology of Arithmetic by Robin Butterfield, 1988) by the Pythagorean (Neoplatonist) Iamblichus (c. 245 – 325 ACE):

"Four are the foundations of wisdom ––- arithmetiké, mousiké, geometría, astronomía – ordered 1 (Monad), 2 (Dyad), 3 (Triad), 4 (Tetrad)".

The four numbers are non-arithmetical. They are, like arithmetiké, mousiké, geometría, astronomía, profound metaphors, which have nothing at all to do with their loanwords arithmetic, music, geometry and astronomy. They characterise the self-observed step-wise creation (genesis) of the psychic kósmos as obtained by what Plato calls the practice of dying (meléte thanátou). This provides unconditioned knowledge (gnósis) by recollection (anamnésis).

Similar words for the step-wise creation of the kósmos are offered in Timaios (36) by Plato: "Arithmetiké, harmoniké, geometriké were the three principles by which demiurgos (artificer) proportioned the kósmos".

Iamblichus’ words are corroborated in Lao Tzu’s Daodejing (Chapter 42):

"The Dao creates 1, 1 creates 2, 2 creates 3, which creates the 10.000 things".

Lao Tzu clarifies them in Chapter 25:

"There exists chaos (mixed thing), which existed already before heaven and earth existed, still and formless. It is in a state of a circular movement nourished by itself. One may call it the mother of 10.000 things. I do not know its name and for that matter I call it Dao (Tao). Because I find no better attribute, I call it 'great (Da)'".

All cited quotes above comply with the Pythagorean oath:

"… by him that gave to our generation the Tetraktys, which contains the fount and root of eternal nature (phýsis)".

They can be conceived with the Socrates Code. The more familiar one becomes with it, the better the above quotes can be understood.

See also my critical reviews here on Amazon on:

Plato: Timaeus and Critias (Penguin Classics), translated by Desmond Lee Plato,
Plato. Symposium (Hackett Classics) translated by Alexander Nehamas and Paul Woodruff,
Plato. Republic (Hackett Classics) translated by C. D. C. Reeve,
Theology of Arithmetic by Robin Butterfield,

For futher details see my Youtube presentation:
TAO: PATH TO DISCOVER THE PSYCHO-COSMIC ORIGIN OF THE WESTERN CULTURE.
Malalrajas
I had to look up "Doxography" in the Oxford English Dictionary - it is a collection of philosophical opinions. The book "Greek Astronomy" is a Dover reprint of a book written in 1932. It consists of a long (57 pages) introduction followed by a great many quotes (rendered into English) from ancient Greek authors. The selection emphasizes general questions, such as "Does the Earth move?" - according to Ptolemy it does not. Perhaps useful as a souce book. But then again, perhaps not.