Free eBook The Blue Flower download

by Penelope Fitzgerald

Free eBook The Blue Flower download ISBN: 0002239124
Author: Penelope Fitzgerald
Publisher: Flamingo; First edition (1995)
Language: English
Pages: 206
Category: Imaginative Literature
Subcategory: World Literature
Size MP3: 1958 mb
Size FLAC: 1158 mb
Rating: 4.1
Format: docx lrf doc txt


Novels arise out of the shortcomings of history.

Novels arise out of the shortcomings of history. Fritz, I’m afraid you have brought me here at an inconvenient moment. You should have let me know.

The Blue Flower is a 1995 novel by the British author Penelope Fitzgerald. It is a fictional treatment of the early life of Friedrich von Hardenberg who, under the pseudonym Novalis, later became a practitioner of German Romanticism

The Blue Flower is a 1995 novel by the British author Penelope Fitzgerald. It is a fictional treatment of the early life of Friedrich von Hardenberg who, under the pseudonym Novalis, later became a practitioner of German Romanticism. The novel was the first book published in paperback by Mariner Books, then a new imprint of Houghton Mifflin.

The Blue Flower is a magical book-funny, sad, and deeply moving. In Fritz Fitzgerald has discovered a perfect character through whom to explore the meaning of love, poetry, life, and loss. In The Blue Flower readers will find a work of fine prose, fierce intelligence, and perceptive characterization. From Library Journal.

Penelope Fitzgerald, The Blue Flower. Thank you for reading books on GrayCity. The free online library containing 450000+ books. Read books for free from anywhere and from any device.

Penelope Fitzgerald, whose biography I have just written, began work on her beautiful masterpiece The Blue Flower in 1991. It took her four years, and was published in Britain in 1995, when she was 78, and in the US in 1997, where it won the National Book Critics Circle Award. This made her, not just greatly admired, but internationally acclaimed. But there were to be no more. Penelope Fitzgerald, whose biography I have just written, began work on her beautiful masterpiece The Blue Flower in 1991.

One of the most admired of all Penelope Fitzgerald's books, The Blue Flower was chosen as Book of the Year more than any other in 1995.

Set in Germany at the very end of the eighteenth century, The Blue Flower is the story of the brilliant Fritz von Hardenberg, a graduate of the Universities of Jena, Leipzig and Wittenberg, learned in Dialectics and Mathematics, who later became the great romantic poet and philosopher Novalis. One of the most admired of all Penelope Fitzgerald's books, The Blue Flower was chosen as Book of the Year more than any other in 1995.

One of the most admired of all Penelope Fitzgerald’s books, The Blue Flower was chosen as Book of the Year more than any other in 1995. Her final book, it confirmed her reputation as one of the finest novelists of the century. To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate.

The inaugural book is The Blue Flower by Penelope Fitzgerald, a book set in the Romantic era highlighting the all .

The inaugural book is The Blue Flower by Penelope Fitzgerald, a book set in the Romantic era highlighting the all too familiar historical negation o. It feels appropriate to inaugurate the ADONE book club with a novel that celebrates a longing for the unreachable, a striving for the transcendental beyond, for what are books but imagined windows onto great unknowns and worlds just beyond our reach? Stemming from within the dawn of the Romantic period, the blue flower was, and remains, a symbol of aspiration towards intellectual creativity.

User reviews
LiTTLe_NiGGa_in_THE_СribE
Heartbreaking and hilarious, compassionate and severe. A glittering jewel-box of a novel. It’s the sort of book, as other reviewers have suggested, where you end up living inside its world.

For a historical novel, The Blue Flower is vanishingly slim. It has 55 brief chapters--essentially vignettes of a few pages each--concluding with an incredibly spare and moving afterword. The German I found off-putting at first, but it’s mostly people’s names, nicknames, and place names and adds a lovely antique shade to the prose. (If audio is your speed and German is not, I definitely recommend the audiobook read by Derek Perkins—he gives marvelous voice to the ensemble cast and dispatches the German with utmost fluency!)

So what is The Blue Flower? Better to start with what it’s not: it isn't, first of all, anything like an 18th-century Lolita story, although it’s hard not to make that link. Surely Fitzgerald wrote with this knowledge, although we don’t see her dropping any hints to that effect: the story feels deeply rooted in its time period. While the poet and philosopher Fritz von Hardenberg is attracted to young Sophie von Kuhn's looks, the way he describes her to others and speaks to her directly makes it clear that he’s primarily attracted to his self-created idea of the girl.

Fritz calls Sophie “my heart’s heart.” For me, the “heart’s heart” of The Blue Flower lies in how it imagines the lives of two very different families, and in the questions its asks about the fragility of childhood and youth. Childhood and young adulthood in The Blue Flower look all the more fleeting and strange given how uncertain it was at that time for a person to survive to any great age.

Social expectations for young women and girls also weave into the novel's reflections on youth: Fritz’s family and friends are startled and even shocked at his attachment to a twelve-year old girl, but since she is expected to marry at sixteen, how much (or how little) time has she left for childish things anyway? Does she become genuinely attached to him, and if so, in what ways? In the case of Fritz’s close friend Karoline Just, what happens if you are only in your twenties, yet feel that life has passed you by?

But I don’t mean to make the book sound like a puzzle to be labored over. While some have experienced this as a dry or demanding read, or felt that Fitzgerald is overly harsh to her characters, the families’ emotions struck me as powerful and deeply felt. I think I will continue living with this book, again and again.
Sharpbinder
As first I wasn't sure if I was reading fact or fiction and I suspect it was a mixture of both. Having just finished The beginning of Spring by the same author I was really looking forward to this book as many reviewers say it is her best. I preferred the other one. This book is well written and life during that period appears to be well researched but the characters did not come alive for me as they did in The Beginning of Spring. It wasn't clear to me why a well educated man became infatuated with a child, not a very intelligent one at that. I think that's what I hoped to find out by reading the book but didn't as I didn't get to know the characters well enough. A peculiar tale and probably if it occurred nowadays he's be arrested for being a pervert.
Jogas
I learned more than I ever thought I even wanted to about 17-18th c. Germany. And about Novalis. Fitzgerald's interest in complex, tragicomic family life must stem from her own family experience; I read THE BLUE FLOWER mainly because I just read her newish biography.
BTW, the question about pace offers no really relevant answers. The book appears to move very slowly--and then slam! bang! I should add that, although I knew in advance the THE BLUE FLOWER is based on the early life of the famous poet known as Novalis, I completely forgot that as I read the book--which I regard as a compliment to the book's intrinsic interest.
ZloyGenii
Even though this is an historical novel, it is nothing like what one might expect from that genre. The chapters are short and sweet, no explanations about life in the 16th century, yet Fitzgerald creates an intimate sense of life in German in this time and place with beautiful descriptions of landscape and domestic life and interiors. The book has humor and sadness as she describes the life of its hero Fritz von Hardenberg, before he became Novalis, the late 18th century German Romantic poet. This is a story of love lost. The book is rich in the details of life in those times and in the portrayal of vivid characters who play important roles in the doomed courtship of this Fritz and his beloved Sophie, who dies of consumption. Fitzgerals includes so much with so little, as if she believes that less is more, which in this case is true. A beautiful book.
Cae
1905. Frank , a printer, is an Englishman raised in Moscow. He has wed Nellie an Englishwoman and live back in Moscow. They have 3 children. But one day Nellie leaves with the children , sending them home only to disappear on her own. Why? This mystery is cleared only at the very end. Beautifuuly written, details of life in Moscow forming a backdrop for 2 love stories told with wit and wisdom, this book holds the reader with it's fine writing and humor. Anyone who enjoys a terrific writer will enjoy this book.