Free eBook The A26 download

by Melanie Florence,Pascal Garnier

Free eBook The A26 download ISBN: 1908313161
Author: Melanie Florence,Pascal Garnier
Publisher: Gallic Books (April 14, 2015)
Language: English
Pages: 112
Category: Imaginative Literature
Subcategory: World Literature
Size MP3: 1208 mb
Size FLAC: 1742 mb
Rating: 4.6
Format: lit rtf docx lrf


Pascal Garnier: Pascal Garnier is a leading figure in contemporary French literature, in the tradition of Georges Simenon.

Pascal Garnier: Pascal Garnier is a leading figure in contemporary French literature, in the tradition of Georges Simenon. He lived in a small village in the Ardèche devoting himself to writing and painting. Boxes was my third read from Pascal Garnier, after enjoying The Front Seat Passenger and The Islanders. Brice has moved to the countryside.

Pascal Garnier is not just an accomplished stylist but also an exceptional storytelle. he Panda Theory is both dazzlingly humane and . he Panda Theory is both dazzlingly humane and heartbreakingly lucid. The A26. Pascal Garnier. Translated from the French. About the Author.

Pascal Garnier, who died in March 2010, was a talented novelist, short story writer, children’s . See if your friends have read any of Pascal Garnier's books. The A26 by. Pascal Garnier, Melanie Florence (Translator).

Pascal Garnier, who died in March 2010, was a talented novelist, short story writer, children’s author and painter  .

If his sister is trapped by the past and the house, then everyone else is trapped by their limited horizons. For all that a new motorway, the A26, is being built, none will escape. Unlock quality journalism on the topics that you decide matter most.

By 1976 long time rail worker Bernard knows he is dying. The latest Gallic translation of a Pascal Garnier suspenseful French middle class tragedy (see The Front Seat Passenger, Moon in a Dead Eye, The Panda Theory and How’s the Pain?) is another character-driven dark surrealistic novella. Though written in 1999, The A76 is very timely as the reclusive siblings reject change like the roadway and his illness as unacceptable while demanding society takes back a France created in their respective images.

Read The A26, by Pascal Garnier online on Bookmate – The future is on its way to Picardy with the construction of a huge motorway. But nearby is a house where nothing has changed since 1945. The future is on its way to Picardy with the construction of a huge motorway. Traumatised by events that year, Yolande hasn't left her home since. And life has not been kinder to Bernard, her brother, who is now in the final months of a terminal illness. Realizing that he has so little time left, Bernard's gloom suddenly lifts. With no longer anything to lose, he becomes reckless – and murderous.

A26 by Pascal Garnier 9781908313164 (Paperback, 2013) Delivery UK delivery is usually within 12 to 14 working days. Read full description. The A26 by Pascal Garnier (Paperback, 2013). Brand new: lowest price.

However, Bernard loses what is left of his hold on sanity when construction of the A26 motorway comes to Picardy. He regrets what could have been with his friend Jacqueline, married to an abusive husband, if he romantically courted her instead of remaining loyally protective of his lunatic sister Yolande. However, Bernard loses what is left of his hold on sanity when construction of the A26 motorway comes to Picardy. To rectify the latest modernization encroachment that symbolizes to Bernard the end of his life, he begins killing people.

Pascal Garnier, Melanie Florence. With no longer anything to lose, he becomes reckless - and murderous - show more.

OK. Have some rest and come back to us soon rted, indefinite sick leave. It seemed just like any other day, however. Bernard felt no worse than the day before. Decidedly better in fact. The two days after Serge’s First Communion had been a veritable agony: vomiting, migraines, an intense feeling of malaise. Then, on making this decision, a sort of respite. It’s a matter of attitude, Monsieur Bonnet,’ Machon said.

"A most wonderfully wry noir murder mystery you'll not soon forget."—Durango Herald

"Garnier's sly, cynical take on life will strike a chord with readers of every age."—Publishers Weekly

"Ultimately a very dark novel, but a very impressive one."—The Complete Review

Bernard lives with his sister Yolande who hasn't left the house since 1945. Bernard is now in the final months of a terminal illness. With no longer anything to lose, he becomes reckless—and murderous.

Locally the A26 is under construction. Concrete still wet, it stands ready to serve as a discrete cemetery for lost girls.

User reviews
CopamHuk
Brother and sister Bernard and Yolande have lived together all their lives. Yolande remains permanently holed up in their house, every door locked, every window covered, her only viewpoint on the world a small hole in one of the blinds. And for Yolande, the world she looks out on is still in the grip of WW2, a period that traumatised her so completely she has never recovered. Bernard has been the functional one, his job on the railway providing their income. He has given up his own chance of a personal life to look after his older sister. But now Bernard has been told that he is dying, and suddenly all the missed opportunities and disappointments of his life erupt into violence...

Given the novella length of this book, it packs a mighty punch. Ink-black noir, there are no gleams of light or humour to lift the tone. On the surface, Bernard and Yolande are a pair of extremely dysfunctional and disturbed siblings, each with their own streak of madness, and with the potential for violence simmering not far below the surface. The book has a thriller format, seen from the perspectives of the perpetrators of the various crimes that take place.

But it seems to me (though I may be over-analysing it) that the entire novella is a metaphor for a France still bleeding from the wounds inflicted on it in WW2 – the wounds of defeat, collaboration and betrayal – wounds that eventual victory may have covered, but with the thinnest of scar tissue, easily scratched away. The book was written in 1999, and is set perhaps a couple of decades before that, when many people were still alive who had lived through the war. And Garnier shows this couple as having been damaged even before the war began, much as France still reeled from the horrors inflicted upon its landscape and people in the First World War.

" 'Row upon row, their white tunics stained with blood like that bastard of a butcher. “I kill you, you kill me.” And the more they killed, the more of them sprang up again, it was truly miraculous! That's why there'll never be an end to the war – anyway, it's always been here, it's that kind of country, there's nothing else to do but go to war. The only thing that grows is white crosses.' "

Yolande had committed the crime of having an affair with a German soldier and had paid the price when her countrymen shaved her head to display her disgrace to the world. But Garnier's description shows that this episode was as much to do with lust and cruelty as justice and patriotism. The world may have forgotten Yolande's shame but she has never forgotten those who shamed her. There is the chance for Yolande to throw the past aside and go back out into the world, but she carries her prison with her in her mind. She's not a weak woman, far from it. Her selfishness makes her monstrous and it's hard to see her as having been a victim. She is a fact, a piece of history, a hidden scandal, France's shame. And that unresolved shame is shown metaphorically to be still shuddering through the later generations.

Bernard has watched the woman he loved marry another man – a cruel, boorish man who treats her badly, and when he receives his death sentence his pent-up frustrations and anger boil over into a murderous spree. There are some shocking scenes of violence and horror, but they're not written in an overly graphic way – Garnier is painting impressionistic images rather than drawing detailed pictures. His descriptions are full of craters and mud, and when he describes places he does it in terms of their association with battles and war, this modern landscape scarred still with reminders of France's violent past. The A26, being built in the book, runs through or past many of the great battlefields of France and close to those of Belgium – Arras, the Somme, Ypres – and Garnier plays darkly with the conjunction of the digging of the road and the history of its bloody surroundings.

To say I enjoyed this would be a total misuse of the word. It is too dark, too upsetting, to enjoy. But it is powerful and gut-wrenching, with Garnier's compelling writing enhanced by an excellent translation from Melanie Florence. I may have made it sound more political than it is, though that's how it struck me. But it works too on the level of being an extremely dark thriller, leading up to an ending that shocked me and left me feeling completely undecided as to the morality of the tale. Despite the awfulness of their actions, there was some part of me that empathised with each of the dreadful siblings, and that was the most unsettling aspect of all. As entertainment, I enjoyed Garnier's 'Boxes' more, but for me this one is the more powerful and meaningful, and therefore better, of the two. 4½ stars for me, so rounded up.

NB This book was provided for review by the publisher, Gallic Books.
Dawncrusher
I'm very grateful to Gallic Books for introducing me to the works of Pascal Garnier. The A26 is my second Garnier book, following The Panda Theory, and as was the case in The Panda Theory, the lives of the main characters in The A26, Yolande and Bernard, are dark and haunted by the past.

The publisher's description of this book led me to expect Bernard to be the driving force of the story, yet it is actually Yolande who serves as its brooding center. She is a paranoid agoraphobe who has never recovered from her experiences in World War II. Those experiences circumscribe, and ultimately define, the siblings' lives for decades, until Bernard's terminal illness irrevocably alters their relationship, both with each other and with the outside world.

The A26 was translated by Melanie Florence, and I found her use of British slang (e.g., bugger off, pinny, biro) jarring in a book set in France. I don't recall having the same problem while reading The Panda Theory, which was translated by Svein Clouston. Next up on my Garnier TBR pile is Boxes, also translated by Florence, so I will soon see whether this continues to be an issue.

I received a free copy of The A26 through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.
Anayaron
The A26
Pascal Garnier; Melanie Florence (translator)
Gallic Books, Apr 7 2015, $12.95
ISBN: 9781908313164

By 1976 long time rail worker Bernard knows he is dying. He regrets what could have been with his friend Jacqueline, married to an abusive husband, if he romantically courted her instead of remaining loyally protective of his lunatic sister Yolande. Still old habits has Bernard worrying about what will happen to crazy Yolande when he dies; as she still believes WWII is still going on and has not left their Picardy cluttered cottage they reside in since 1945 when their neighbors vilified her for being a Nazi collaborator.

However, Bernard loses what is left of his hold on sanity when construction of the A26 motorway comes to Picardy. To rectify the latest modernization encroachment that symbolizes to Bernard the end of his life, he begins killing people.

The latest Gallic translation of a Pascal Garnier suspenseful French middle class tragedy (see The Front Seat Passenger, Moon in a Dead Eye, The Panda Theory and How’s the Pain?) is another character-driven dark surrealistic novella. Though written in 1999, The A76 is very timely as the reclusive siblings reject change like the roadway and his illness as unacceptable while demanding society takes back a France created in their respective images.

Harriet Klausner
Naktilar
Thanks to NetGalley and the publishers who provided me with an ARC of this book in exchange for an honest review.

What an amazing little book! Dark and cruel, but beautifully written (and translated).

Sad, ill Bernard lives with his sister Yolande, who hasn't left the house since the end of the war. Bernard knows he has little time left to live and out of the blue starts killing people. Meanwhile, his sister is getting crazier by the day.

Everything is dark in this books: the atmosphere, the feeling, the house. However, it is a smooth read and easy book to read, one that leaves you wondering how did all go wrong for the characters in it.

I'll certainly be reading more of Pascal Garnier's books!