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Free eBook David Golder, The Ball, Snow in Autumn, The Courilof Affair (Everyman's Library Contemporary Classics Series) download

by Sandra Smith,Claire Messud,Irene Nemirovsky

Free eBook David Golder, The Ball, Snow in Autumn, The Courilof Affair (Everyman's Library Contemporary Classics Series) download ISBN: 0307267083
Author: Sandra Smith,Claire Messud,Irene Nemirovsky
Publisher: Everyman's Library / Alfred A. Knopf; 1st edition (January 15, 2008)
Language: English
Pages: 363
Category: Imaginative Literature
Subcategory: World Literature
Size MP3: 1280 mb
Size FLAC: 1775 mb
Rating: 4.4
Format: txt lrf mobi lit


Series: Everyman's Library Contemporary Classics Series. Hardcover: 363 pages. Snow in Autumn" is the story of an aristocratic Russian family that flees the Russian Revolution and tries to start life again in Paris

Series: Everyman's Library Contemporary Classics Series. Snow in Autumn" is the story of an aristocratic Russian family that flees the Russian Revolution and tries to start life again in Paris. It is the loyal nanny, deeply religious family rock and center of this story, who proves unable to adapt to the new situation and suffers the consequences. The privileged members of the family somehow find their way in the new place.

Irene Nemirovsky (Author), Claire Messud (Introduction), Sandra Smith (Translator) & 0 more

Irene Nemirovsky (Author), Claire Messud (Introduction), Sandra Smith (Translator) & 0 more. In a single volume, readers can find four of Nemirovsky's gem-like early novellas-David Golder, The Ball, Snow in Autumn, and The Courilof Affair-with all the trimmings: a shrewd introduction by Claire Messud (The Emperor's Children) and a detailed chronology of the author's life and times. These first novellas demonstrate Némirovsky's genius for exposing an individual's virtues and flaws, much like a jeweler examining a diamond under a loupe.

All these four stories are short but David Golder & The Courilof Affair are . The Courilof Affair- written in 1933. This book is from Everyman's Library. Thanks to John Grant on this site for highlighting this author, thus bringing her to my attention.

All these four stories are short but David Golder & The Courilof Affair are longer than The Ball & Snow in Autumn. Irene stays true to the adage write what you know which each story has an element of that plus quite a story. This is a diary entry of a revolutionary terrorist in 1903 Russia. It tells of his life before but mostly as he is placed in Courilof's entourage as Swiss doctor taking care of The Minster of Education. A very good read, particularly learning of this woman's life.

DAVID GOLDER is the novel that established Néirovsky’s reputation in France in 1929 when she was twenty-six

DAVID GOLDER is the novel that established Néirovsky’s reputation in France in 1929 when she was twenty-six. It is a novel about greed and lonliness, the story of a self-made business man, once wealthy, now suffering a breakdown as he nears the lonely end of his life. THE COURILOF AFFAIR tells the story of a Russian revolutionary living out his last days–and his recollections of his first infamous assassination

THE COURILOF AFFAIR tells the story of a Russian revolutionary living out his last days–and his recollections of his first infamous assassination.

David Golder, The Ball, Snow in Autumn, The Courilof Affair (Everyman's Library (Cloth)).

Everyman's Library Contemporary Classics Series. Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group. The Snow in Autumn, however, was really well done, and is definitely a precursor of the brilliance on full display in works like Suite Francaise. cat-ballou, January 22, 2014.

Each of us has his weaknesses

Each of us has his weaknesses. Human nature is incomprehensible, muses the mysterious Leon . narrator of Irene Nemirovsky’s 1933 novel, The Courilof Affair. Snow in Autumn appeared a year after The Ball, in 1931, but is the definitive version of a tale published in 1924, La Niania, a discreet homage to her grandmother, Rosa Margoulis, who had just fled from the USSR to France. It represents a departure of sorts for Nemirovsky, in that it tackles the Russian emigres’ flight to France from a different angle, and also in its choice of a servant as the protagonist.

The free online library containing 500000+ books.

Irène Némirovsky, David Golder, the Ball, Snow in Autumn, the Courilof Affair. Thank you for reading books on GrayCity. The free online library containing 500000+ books. Read books for free from anywhere and from any device. Listen to books in audio format instead of reading.

Nemirovsky Irene (ES). Readers everywhere were introduced to the work of Irene Nemirovsky through the publication of her long-lost masterpiece, Suite Franaise. But Suite Franaise was only the coda to the brief yet remarkably prolific career of this nearly forgotten, magnificent novelist. DAVID GOLDER is the novel that established Neirovsky's reputation in France in 1929 when she was twenty-six.

Readers everywhere were introduced to the work of Irène Némirovsky through the publication of her long-lost masterpiece, Suite Française. But Suite Française was only the coda to the brief yet remarkably prolific career of this nearly forgotten, magnificent novelist. Here in one volume are four of Némirovsky’s other novels–all of them newly translated by the award-winning Sandra Smith, and all, except DAVID GOLDER, available in English for the first time.

 

DAVID GOLDER is the novel that established Néirovsky’s reputation in France in 1929 when she was twenty-six. It is a novel about greed and lonliness, the story of a self-made business man, once wealthy, now suffering a breakdown as he nears the lonely end of his life. THE COURILOF AFFAIR tells the story of a Russian revolutionary living out his last days–and his recollections of his first infamous assassination. Also included are two short, gemlike novels: THE BALL, a pointed exploration of adolescence and the obsession with status among the bourgeoisie; and SNOW IN AUTUMN, an evocative tale of White Russian émigrés in Paris after the Russian Revolution.

 

Introduced by celebrated novelist Claire Messud, this collection of four spellbinding novels offers the same storytelling mastery, powerful clarity of language, and empathic grasp of human behavior that would give shape to Suite Française.

 (Book Jacket Status: Jacketed)

User reviews
Zeus Wooden
That Irene Nemirovsky was a complicated, and probably conflicted, woman there seems little doubt. That she was a writer of astounding talent, there is no question at all. This wonderfully printed collection of four of her early writings by Everyman's Library is proof of just how elegant and knowing her prose was. The stories often reflect Nemirovsky's own striving background--a Russian Jew emigre with ambition to succeed at the highest levels of the French cultural and social scenes. This was a France that wasn't so far from the anti-semitic past of the Dreyfuss Affair. Nemirovsky's ambivalence about her Jewish roots is arguably a strong driving force in her stories.

The collection's first story, "David Golder", is a grim but poignant and eloquent tale of an aging banker (David Golder), who started life in an East European ghetto and climbed to great wealth and an haut bougeouis lifestyle that has become a pleasureless treadmill. Terrified of dying as his health fails rapidly, he breaks with his vapid and faithless wife and struggles to find some meaning in his life as well as some reason to go on living. Part and parcel of the man's inner turmoil is reflexive antagonism and scorn toward his fellow Jews, particularly if they are less well off financially or less French-assimilated. Ultimately, he sacrifices his health and future for his daughter, who is among literature's least deserving young women, in her unyielding self-absorption and demands for money. Author Nemirovsky somehow makes David Golder a quasi sympathetic figure despite the thinness of his humanity and blindness toward his daughter's failings. His inevitable death is presented in telling detail but not as a just outcome. It's a painful, but remarkable story.

"The Ball" is a short story that is meant to skewer the worst behavior of the Paris arriviste bourgeoisie and ends with a delicious irony. There is more than a little anti-semitism in the tone of the story, but it is even more a general condemnation of social climbing and lack of respect for one's roots.

"Snow in Autumn" is the story of an aristocratic Russian family that flees the Russian Revolution and tries to start life again in Paris. It is the loyal nanny, deeply religious family rock and center of this story, who proves unable to adapt to the new situation and suffers the consequences. The privileged members of the family somehow find their way in the new place.

Finally, "The Courilof Affair" is an amazing account of a Russian revolutionary who becomes part of the household of the aristocratic Tsarist government official he has been assigned to assassinate. This is a brilliant story with highly developed characters and a certain tension that makes it a kind of unexpected page-turner.

This book is a true showcase of Irene Nemirovsky's talents as a writer. There were aspects of her character that are still troubling to many, but her skill in observing and commenting on human behavior and in creating realistic character portraits is indisputable.
Glei
These stories are intimate, nuanced and well-told as they evoke the lives of Europeans from many angles -- business, love, family and more. To read Nemirovsky is to be given a window into a different time, with insights that appear almost effortlessly from her pen. I have yet to read a book or story by Nemirovsky that hasn't hit true notes.
Levion
There isn't much to cheer about in any of these stories except possibly seeing people who behave badly get what they deserve. I wondered if IM had a chip on her shoulder to create such nasty characters of her own faith, possibly lending credence to the suggestion that she herself may have been anti-Semitic; that and her conversion to Christianity. That is a discussion for another time and place. Some have called the characters in this collection vapid but I think that IM is writing more about the environment that the characters either created for themselves or existed in than she is about the characters themselves. David Golder is a scathing commentary on the Jewish stereotype. DG created what his wife and daughter became and he paid the price. Who knows what the wife and daughter would have been like had they lived in a different economic environment. The Courilof Affair is full of contradictions. Courilof professes his belief in God and his Christian duty yet he was a tyrant responsible for the deaths of many. He was torn between his sense of duty to his Emperor and country and wanting to walk away from it all. Leon M., alias Marcel Legrand, was also torn, questioning the meaning of his whole life as a revolutionary after seeing the human side of the man he was supposed to assassinate. He eventually realized that he wasn't much different that those he killed. He realized that he and Courilof both thought that they were eliminating the unjust for the good of the majority. This said, these stories are an easy read and I did enjoy them. Learning of IM's demise in Auschwitz angered me, reminding me of the human filth that the Nazis were. I hope that my having read these novels in some way honors IM's memory.
Delagamand
While not as consistently good as "Suite Francais," this volume has as its best selections David Golder and The Courilof Affair. "Golder" is intriguing in that it was used by her husband in an attempt to free her from the concentration camp. An unflattering portrait of its title character, it begins with a scene that reminded me of the opening of "Citizen Cane." The closing story will please those fond of Kafka. It is rife with issues of ethics and government. The Everyman edition is also a very handsome volume.
Dusar
Nemirovsky is one of my favourite authors. She holds the reader, writing about some the darkest parts of history. She takes the reader behind closed door and opens our eyes to the lowest moments of humanity.
JoJogar
so sad
Urreur
A slice of life in a dysfunctional family....a story of an aging mother and her child who feels unloved and
a husband who doesn't know what to do to create peace.
The story feels honest with all emotions felt but hidden to each other!
A friend recommended Suite Francaise. Read it loved it. Now reading this collection and am in complete awe of Irene's writing. Not always easy to read, some harsh situations, but ultimately rewarding.