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Free eBook Children in the Night download

by Harold Myra

Free eBook Children in the Night download ISBN: 0310572517
Author: Harold Myra
Publisher: Zondervan; First Edition edition (July 1, 1991)
Language: English
Pages: 301
Category: Imaginative Literature
Subcategory: United States
Size MP3: 1268 mb
Size FLAC: 1695 mb
Rating: 4.4
Format: doc lrf rtf azw


Children in the Night, a spectacular tale. Published by Thriftbooks. com User, 19 years ago. With out a doubt a masterpiece! Harold Myra has managed to bring to life two of the most wonderful characters I've ever read about. Their development couldn't have been better

Children in the Night, a spectacular tale. Their development couldn't have been better. Myra discribes his scenes, amidst a world of complete darkness, with such ease and fluidity that no detail is left out. I recomend this book to anyone with an adventerous heart. The story is both thought provoking and gripping, while the characters are endearing and as real as a book could possibly make them

Children in the night. Myra, Harold Lawrence, 1939-.

Children in the night. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

Harold Myra’s most popular book is The Leadership Secrets of Billy Graham. Children in the Night by. Harold Myra. Santa, Are You For Real? by.

Harold Lawrence Myra (born 1939 in Camden, New Jersey) is an American journalist and publishing executive who was the chief executive of Christianity Today for 32 years.

Love Harold Myra Holiday books. Anyone saying that this, a children's book that is very easy to understand and directed toward children, is somehow inappropriate, are being way too sensitive and should probably censor over half of the Bible from their children, as well. He has a great way of talking to children. I keep extra books in my classroom. Format: HardcoverVerified Purchase. Best book around explaining the real meaning of Halloween.

Childe Harold’s Pilgrimage, autobiographical poem in four cantos by George Gordon, Lord Byron. Cantos I and II were published in 1812, Canto III in 1816, and Canto IV in 1818. Byron gained his first poetic fame with the publication of the first two cantos. In the fourth canto the imaginary pilgrim is replaced by the poet himself, speaking in the first person about Venice, Ferrara, Florence, and Rome and the artists and heroes associated with those cities. To Byron’s literary public, the work offered a poetic travelogue of picturesque lands and gave vent to the prevailing moods of melancholy and disillusionment.

Harold Night is a great time

Harold Night is a great time. wit. None of it's been written- it's a night devoted to improvised discovery and human connection, brought to the stage by incredibly talented performers who also happen to be funny as heck.

Home Harold L. Goodwin The Riddle of the Night. The riddle of the night, . 9. Margot's bracelet in the pocket of Harry Raynor's evening coat wassomething rather more significant than Margot's picture and Margot'sletters in Harry Raynor's tobacco jar, for an evening coat consortedwell with an evening frock, and some woman who was not Ailsa Lorne, noryet Lady Katharine Fordham, had worn an evening frock at Gleer Cottagelast night.

Addresses in the following State Codes AK, HI, AE, AP, AA, PR, GU, MP, PW, AS, VI, FM and APO/FPO addresses with . ZIP Codes will ship for free with value shipping.

Home, Furniture & Appliances. Addresses in the following State Codes AK, HI, AE, AP, AA, PR, GU, MP, PW, AS, VI, FM and APO/FPO addresses with . You will see this noted in checkout. Ineligible items & addresses.

Yosha and Asel, who come from a society that lives in darkness in caverns deep underground, search for the light which their people's traditions have never forgotten
User reviews
misery
I first read "Children in the Night" back when it was originally released in 1991. It had a major impact on me back then and still does today. So I ordered another copy and read it again. Harold Myra not only weaves an epic tale of life and death he also creates a "non-preachy" story of the struggle between Light and Darkness. The book can be enjoyed simply as an exiting tale of adventure or if you're the type of person who likes to think you can read it and get a life-changing experience. The tale is one of fantasy but not what one would normally read with elves and trolls. There are a few new creatures but nothing so unusual our own earth hasn't seen the likes of them before. What is different is that the entire book takes place in total darkness. What our characters experience in the flesh, we on earth experience in the spirit (though most don't recognize it). The story is epic at first because it spans quite a few years but the book is so well-written that it flows very well and there is no confusion or missing parts. The second half of the book time stops jumping ahead and we see the effects of darkness that was slowing gaining ground.

I found the catholic review of the book listed above under Editorial Reviews to not only be typical of catholism but wrong on many counts. I'm not sure the person even read the book. Do yourself a favor and ignore the review. I will say this though, if you are religious but do not know Jesus Christ personally this book will either help change your life forever (and I mean forever) or you'll hate it because it crushes your religion and legalism. This book is about truth and freedom. The violence is also far from extreme or grotesque. The book contains war so obviously there will be violence but it was tastefully done.

"Children in the Night" is a solo book but Harold did write two sequels which are not as good but still worth reading. Book two is "The Shining Face" and book three is "Morning Child". I would not say these books make a trilogy but I still suggest reading them.

I did have a couple of problems with the book. One, why did he come up with names for creatures that were impossible to pronounce? Like "Kjotik". What the heck is that? Russian? Two, which I guess isn't really a problem at all, the entire book makes me a bit claustrophobic. When one reads a book they picture things, places and people in their head; we visualize what the author has written. With "Children in the Night" this can not and does not happen. The book takes place in total darkness. When reading the book I can't see anything. I'm as blind as the characters in the book. Although I didn't need medication for this problem I did find it a bit unnerving. I guess that means the ten years Harold Myra took to write this book paid off.

The ending was fantastic and quite a surprise! It gives hope and encouragement to continue in the work set before us.

Hopefully this book will never go out-of-print. Buy a few copies and spread them around. It would make a great gift for those who don't believe.

1 Star = Pathetic
2 Stars = Fair
3 Stars = Good
4 Stars = Excellent
5 Stars = Life changing
Keth
This whole trilogy is just beautiful. The author not only manages to bring to life an utterly dark underground world, he does so with such magnificent use of the characters' other senses that you can easily imagine yourself right there with them. It's a story of hope in the midst of darkness--a wonderful story of redemption. I recommend the entire trilogy, which includes this book, The Shining Face, and Morning Child.
skriper
Beautifully written and conceptualized, Children in the night is sure to keep your attention as well as make you think. A wonderful allegory with a very clear salvation message. I'm on my second set of books!
Nilarius
Sadly, almost no one has heard of this book. It was published back in 1991, and the author spent more than 10 years writing it. At first glance, it's hard to see why--the book isn't particularly long. But once I started reading, I understood. The world Myra creates is intricately constructed, and unique in one noticeable way: it is completely dark, in the literal sense. The whole story is related using the characters' senses of taste, touch and smell, because they are all functionally blind. Their world is subterranean, and too damp for fire; the only light they ever see comes from sparks and luminous sea creatures.

Within this world, "Children in the Night" follows two main characters, members of the Askirit people group: Yosha, a tormented boy caught between his longing for light and his desire to avenge his father's death, and Asel, a strong-minded elite female warrior who challenges her people's isolationism and fear of the "barbarians" who live outside their land. "Children in the Night" spans many years, despite its modest length, sometimes skipping considerable periods of time. It starts off a bit slowly but doesn't take long to pick up the pace.

I first read the book as a young teenager, and I strongly identified with the story of two young people seeking truth, challenging what they had been told, and fighting for their freedom and that of their people. (Disclaimer: I wouldn't necessarily suggest letting 12-year-olds read this book; it has violent battles and some rather disturbing scenes.) I got caught up in the details, the characters, and the overarching story. Yosha and Asel fascinated me, as did the trio of orphan children Asel rescued from the "barbarian" lands--and Auret, the battered, disabled boy who changes every life he touches.

Today, some 12 years after I first read it, this remains one of my favorite books. I have convinced most of my friends to read it, and all who read it have enjoyed it. The book is a Christian allegory (the Askirit's search for literal light represents our search for spiritual light), but I would have enjoyed it anyway as an engaging fantasy story.
Truthcliff
This is one of the best works of the fantasy genre to have been written in Christian fiction. The imaginative world created by Myra is a wonderful breath of fresh air compared to what is usually published under the rubric "Christian". He skillfully welds Biblical allegory into an decent plot; keeping you on the edge of your seat! The only problem is that at parts Myra skips years of untold story, giving you only a summary of what happened. Despite this, I sincerely recommend this book!
Umdwyn
With out a doubt a masterpiece! Harold Myra has managed to bring to life two of the most wonderful characters I've ever read about. Their development couldn't have been better. Myra discribes his scenes, amidst a world of complete darkness, with such ease and fluidity that no detail is left out. I recomend this book to anyone with an adventerous heart. The story is both thought provoking and gripping, while the characters are endearing and as real as a book could possibly make them.