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Free eBook The Kingdom of Childhood (Center Point Platinum Fiction (Large Print)) download

by Rebecca Coleman

Free eBook The Kingdom of Childhood (Center Point Platinum Fiction (Large Print)) download ISBN: 1611733103
Author: Rebecca Coleman
Publisher: Center Point; Large Print edition (January 1, 2012)
Language: English
Pages: 423
Category: Imaginative Literature
Subcategory: United States
Size MP3: 1487 mb
Size FLAC: 1772 mb
Rating: 4.8
Format: txt lrf docx doc


The Kingdom of Childhood (Hardcover). Published January 1st 2012 by Center Point Large Print. Large Print, Hardcover, 385 pages.

The Kingdom of Childhood (Hardcover). Author(s): Rebecca Coleman (Goodreads Author).

THE KINGDOM of CHILDHOOD, by Rebecca Coleman, is a gripping novel, full of suspense and psychological insight into a woman's first adulterous behavior, laddering up to statutory rape, and finally the shocking decent into insanity. Kindergarten teacher Judy McFarland's life is slowly unraveling.

Coleman’s debut novel is a disturbing yet enthralling read . Recommended for fans of Jodi Picoult’s realistic, ethics-driven novels, as well as book clubs looking for interesting debate. In the kindergarten room, knitted dolls waited in a line beneath a large bright window; wooden fish, painted in pale washes of color, leaped from a swirl of blue silk arranged on a shelf. At the center of it all sat a lantern, nestled among the seashells and pine cones strewn on a small table.

She gave a benign smile, her hands folded between her knees. The waiter plunked a pizza down between us. Then Maggie added, Also, I’ve started going to church. What? You keep saying what, she pointed out. Is your hearing okay? What church?

The Kingdom of Childhood. The wiser being in us leads us to this person because of a relationship in a previous lif. e are led to this person as though by magic.

The Kingdom of Childhood. We now reach a manifold and intricate real. ur youthful energies begin to decline. Authors: Rebecca Coleman. Claim the "The Kingdom of Childhood. Fiction, Teacher-student relationships, Dysfunctional families. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china. Kahle/Austin Foundation.

An emotionally tense, increasingly chilling work of fiction set in the controversial Waldorf school community, it is equal parts enchanting and unsettling and is sure to be a much discussed and much-debated novel. To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate.

Book Description Center Point Large Print.

The Kingdom of Childhood is the story of a boy and a woman. The Kingdom of Childhood is the story of a boy and a woman: sixteenyearold Zach Patterson, uprooted and struggling to reconcile his knowledge of his mother's extramarital affair, and Judy McFarland, a kindergarten teacher watching her family unravel before her eyes The Kingdom of Childhood. 1 February 2013 ·. Do you belong to a book club?

The Kingdom of Childhood is the story of a boy and a woman: sixteen-year-old Zach Patterson, uprooted and struggling to reconcile his knowledge of his mother's extramarital affair, and Judy McFarland, a kindergarten teacher watching her family unravel before her eyes. Thrown together to organize a fundraiser for their failing private school and bonded by loneliness, they begin an affair that at first thrills, then corrupts each of them. Judy sees in Zach the elements of a young man she loved as a child, but what Zach does not realize is that their relationship is - for Judy - only the latest in a lifetime of disturbing secrets. An emotionally tense, increasingly chilling work of fiction set in the controversial Waldorf school community, The Kingdom of Childhood is equal parts enchanting and unsettling and is sure to be a much-discussed and much-debated novel.
User reviews
Gravelblade
This psychological thriller was a page turner for me. It focuses on an inappropriate and illegal sexual relationship between a private school teacher, Judy McFarland and Zach, a 16-year-old student in her school who is a friend of her son. The book flips back and forth in time between the present and Judy's childhood in Germany which sheds some light on her later behavior. There is also some background given on the relationship of Zach and his mother which may have contributed to his behavior.

There are no "heroes" in this novel. I found the main characters to be unlikeable or at least people with whom I could not identify. That wasn't relevant to me, but it may well be important to others. The story deals with disturbing material and may offend some people. That said, if you enjoy psychological case studies and are not offended by inappropriate sex, I think you will enjoy this novel. It is well written, the characters seemed to come to life and the story definitely kept me turning the pages.
Āłł_Ÿøūrš
I began reading THE KINGDOM OF CHILDHOOD with high expectations, interested in perusing a dark novel about the crime of teacher/student rape. Judy has been teaching in private school for 20 years. She's in an unhappy marriage and has a daughter in college and a son ready to graduate high school. She embarks upon abuse (I refuse to say "an affair" because minor students cannot consent to have sexual relationships with their teachers) with one of her son's friends. The novel switches between the mid 90s, during the height of the Clinton/Lewinsky scandal and Judy's childhood in Germany during the early 1960s also switching from first to third person POV.
The flashack chapters, meant to explain Judy's troubled mind, were simply boring. I quickly found myself skimming those chapters. I didn't dislike Judy and I had a some empathy for her. I enjoyed the way her victim Zach was written. Unfortunately the writing was mediocre, the pace slow, the voice fell flat and the switching of POVs didn't work.
To be fair, writing a novel about abuse between a teacher and student would take a particularly gifted novelist, and even an average writer would have had difficulty pulling THE KINGDOM OF CHILDHOOD off.
Kiutondyl
THE KINGDOM of CHILDHOOD, by Rebecca Coleman, is a gripping novel, full of suspense and psychological insight into a woman's first adulterous behavior, laddering up to statutory rape, and finally the shocking decent into insanity.

Kindergarten teacher Judy McFarland's life is slowly unraveling. She and her husband no longer share the connection needed to sustain a marriage borne of love and high ideas. Now in her forties, with her children grown, she finds she has become another humdrum statistic, bitter and looking back at life's what-ifs. And so it changes when her interests light on a 16-year-old boy at her prestigious Waldorf school.

Rebecca Coleman seamlessly weaves past and present, introducing us to Judy as a lonely and frightened child living in Germany. This stunning debut both fascinates and explores complex family relationships, and delves skillfully into the psychological make-up between victim and perpetrator.

The author has created a brilliant multilayered tale. A book which left me thinking long after I read the last page. And after all, isn't that what a great book should do?
ᵀᴴᴱ ᴼᴿᴵᴳᴵᴻᴬᴸ
Every once in a while a book comes along that takes me completely out of my comfort zone, and yet I cannot put it down. This would be the case with The Kingdom of Childhood. The book targets several hot button issues: sex, and then there is sex with minors, various psychiatric dysfunctions, and the moral issue of what is right and wrong.

Judy McFarland is a woman in a mid-life crisis. Her marriage is unraveling, her kids leaving the nest, the Waldorf school where she teaches is collapsing financially, and her best friend has recently died. All this sets up a perfect storm for her doomed attraction to one of her children's friends, sixteen-year-old Zach, who also is a student at the school where she teaches.

Through the use of flashbacks our narrator, Judy, takes us back to Bavaria where she grew up an Army brat with a ghost of a mother and a father she worshiped, and we learn how Judy became the narcissistic person who could prey on a young boy. And, just as Judy's troubled upbringing created her, Zach now teeters on the brink of having his sexual worldview skewed at a very young age; a wheel of dysfunction spinning on into infinity. Uncomfortable stuff, for sure.

Without any spoilers we can tell this story won't end well. How could it? And yet, Rebecca Coleman kept me riveted to this story. Her skill as a writer brings these characters to such life I often felt as though this was an event unfolding in my own world. The dialogue is wonderfully real and the prose ranges from lyrical to stark.

Coleman reached for the stars and pulls her readers into what Donald Maass calls "a perfect blend of inspired premise, larger-than-life characters, high-stakes story, deeply felt themes, and vivid setting." I will think of Judy and Zach for a long time to come.
Nargas
This review is a long time in coming...I was so taken with this novel I had to read it twice to really understand the dynamics of the world we live in today as seen through the eyes of an incredible writer. This is a contemporary novel set between the past, the present and the inevitable future with a school at its core and mental illness as its backdrop. One will find themselves rooting for Zach to overcome his adversary. And one will wish that Judy would wise up...but that is where the mental illness saturates this story. This story jumps from the past in Bavaria to the present in the United States and will hold the reader enthralled in a story that is so rife in the news today.